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From the archives #81 Sample street gate 1943

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  • From the archives #81 Sample street gate 1943

    http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/e...g?t=1321717276

    Looking southwest from 3rd floor of old Standard Surplus Building (bldg 58) in 1943. Machine shop (bldg 72) on right, truck assembly in distance, engineering building on left though not visible. Nothing in this photo still exists though I believe parts of the guard house (bldg 100) may have been saved?
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  • #2
    Geez, wish I could walk into that picture and stay - knowing what I know about how everything would play out from that point. I can feel the cold of a crisp, clear winter morning and the murmur of chatter between co-workers as they head for their workstations. Hard to behold that all that in this photo is no more.

    Richard, that that you say is the truck production bldg - was that where the 6X6s were assembled, or just peacetime commercial truck production?
    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

    Comment


    • #3
      Interesting indeed. Playing off what Bob K. said and considering the year (1943), I wonder what the average age is of the male workers going through the gate.

      Between Studebaker's above-average age workforce even then and being in the second full year of World War II, the average age of those workers was probably in the high 30s, at least...if not well into their 40s.

      Neat photo; so crisp and bright. BP
      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

      Ayn Rand:
      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Great photo. Thinking back to the times...war, and rationing...wonder how many of those folks, building cars, actually owned one?
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

        Comment


        • #5
          When did gasoline rationing begin in the course of the war? BP
          We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

          Ayn Rand:
          "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

          G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Just wait long enough and there will be software for your laptop that will allow you to do that Rosco.

            Originally posted by Roscomacaw View Post
            Geez, wish I could walk into that picture and stay - knowing what I know about how everything would play out from that point. I can feel the cold of a crisp, clear winter morning and the murmur of chatter between co-workers as they head for their workstations. Hard to behold that all that in this photo is no more.

            Richard, that that you say is the truck production bldg - was that where the 6X6s were assembled, or just peacetime commercial truck production?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
              When did gasoline rationing begin in the course of the war? BP
              Gas rationing was begun on May 15, 1942 on the east coast and by December it was nationwide. There was not really a shortage of gas but rubber since the Japs had taken control of the rubber plantations in Malaysia. Most people qualified for an "A" sticker which allowed for only four gallons of fuel per week. That's about 90 miles in your 1939-41 Champion (with overdrive).
              The national speed limit was set at 35 mph. While most recall the inconvenience of gas rationing there were actually 5194 items rationed or under fixed prices. This was monitored by the Office of Price Administration started in April 1941 by FDR. By July 1945 there were 5661 ration boards and thousands more bureaucrats scurrying about to enforce all the regulations. Rationing came to an end on New Years eve 1945.
              Richard Quinn
              Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

              Comment


              • #8
                Notice how no one entered through the open train gates! Nowadays this seen would look different. Even during a fire drill today's kids do not know how to follow safety directions!
                1957 Studebaker Champion 2 door. Staten Island, New York.

                "Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think." -Albert Einstein

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
                  Gas rationing was begun on May 15, 1942 on the east coast and by December it was nationwide. There was not really a shortage of gas but rubber since the Japs had taken control of the rubber plantations in Malaysia. Most people qualified for an "A" sticker which allowed for only four gallons of fuel per week. That's about 90 miles in your 1939-41 Champion (with overdrive).
                  The national speed limit was set at 35 mph. While most recall the inconvenience of gas rationing there were actually 5194 items rationed or under fixed prices. This was monitored by the Office of Price Administration started in April 1941 by FDR. By July 1945 there were 5661 ration boards and thousands more bureaucrats scurrying about to enforce all the regulations. Rationing came to an end on New Years eve 1945.
                  Thanks, Dick; interesting. I note that FDR started rationing in April 1941, 8 months before Pearl Harbor. Hmmmm.....BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've mentioned before, that my prior neighbor (now deceased) related some of his wartime experiences in the Los Angeles area. He'd been deferred from induction at the start of the war because he had a job at Lockheed in Santa Monica. In fact, at one point in his time there, he had occassion to call the Vernon plant once a day to find out how many engines they'd be sending to Santa Monica - this in support of the PV-1 patrol bombers.
                    Anyway, as the war dragged on (seems funny to say that, when WWII lasted less than HALF the years we've been chasing a few zealot thugs around the mountains of Afghanistan!), things finally got to where his deferrment was negated, and he was drafted into the Army. He was in advanced training when the Japs surrendered.
                    One of the tales he liked to tell was of the convoluted shenaigans he had to go thru to get ONE TIRE for the old Plymouth he drove to work daily - and he car pooled with four other folks that worked at Lockheed. Took them a couple months to convince the powers that be to give them one recapped tire to replace the one that that had ply threads wearing away.
                    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                      Thanks, Dick; interesting. I note that FDR started rationing in April 1941, 8 months before Pearl Harbor. Hmmmm.....BP
                      I do not believe there was much rationing going on in '41 but that date is correct for the formation of the OPA. In August 1941 the tire industry was notified that all white sidewall production was to end by August 23. Beginning on December 11, 1941 (four days after Pearl Harbor) the OPM (Office of Production Management) announced that spare tires were to be omitted from all new cars leaving the factory. The factory delivered price for such cars was reduced as follows: Champion $8.00, Commander $11.00, President $13.00, Coupe Express $8.00.
                      Richard Quinn
                      Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The guard house is currently in pieces on a city storage lot not far from where the Oliver plant was.
                        Chris Dresbach

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          In 1942, I was 5 years old. Oddly enough, I remember the 35 mph limit, even on the parkways. I also remember, not only gas rationing, but food rationing. We could only buy a 1/4 lb of butter at a time with a rationing coupon. I don't know why that sticks in my mind. But I don't ever remember us being without the things we needed during the war.
                          Rog
                          '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
                          Smithtown,NY
                          Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What looks odd to me is that the workers must have been milling about outside the gate and at a certain time, they were allowed in. Was this common practice, or, is something else going on here? There are no workers leaving the plant, as if at shift change. There also appears to be a women passerby just outside the gate. Perhaps she walked her man to work??? stupak

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                              Interesting indeed. Playing off what Bob K. said and considering the year (1943), I wonder what the average age is of the male workers going through the gate.

                              Between Studebaker's above-average age workforce even then and being in the second full year of World War II, the average age of those workers was probably in the high 30s, at least...if not well into their 40s.
                              I suspect all the younger males would have been in uniforms out in the service.

                              Craig

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