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Studes that "made it" but were nonetheless lost...

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    I just remembered the '56 President I bought out of a barn in Alabama in the 70s - it's the car I wrote about in "My romance with the President" tale. I eventually sold that car to a co-worker who had been bugging me for it. He took it on several long trips and maybe owned it 5 or 6 months before it's crankshaft broke in two. It went to a junkyard thereafter and I'm fairly certain it never escaped eventual crushing.
    Last edited by Roscomacaw; 11-20-2011, 04:13 PM. Reason: typo

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  • Bob Andrews
    replied
    Originally posted by r1lark View Post
    this category -- the parts worth much more than their value as a (partially) complete car.(
    That pretty much describes most Avantis that need paint and interior.....

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  • r1lark
    replied
    There are also a lot of 'project' cars that have been passed from SDC member to SDC member for years. Each new owner would do a little bit (add some NOS/new parts, rebuild old parts, etc) and then on to someone else. Sometimes these cars never see the road again.............

    These days, with parts/labor costs what they are, these cars sometimes are not viable candidates to complete due to the cost and end up being parted. At least they help other Studebakers stay on the road.

    I have two that probably fit into this category (all right, maybe more) -- the parts worth much more than their value as a (partially) complete car. It's a hard decision to shoot a car in the head that you have protected (and hoped to finish) for 20 years...........

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  • wolfie
    replied
    Dads 62 GT was a show winner when he bought it in the late 70's. We kept it several years until we lost our storage and chose to liquidate the car rather than see it sit outside (in fact Dad would not make a deal with the eventual buyer until he had investigated and determined the car would be stored indoors, heated and cooled). When the car resurfaced and was sold years later it still looked like new. Its next owner was not so enthralled with it and the last time I saw it it had spent the last 5 or 6 years sitting under a large tree and had no floors, rockers, or quarters left to speak of, but was F/S for only $12,500. I passed on it and it disappeared shortly thereafter. Steve

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  • maxpower1954
    replied
    Originally posted by Nelsen Motorsports View Post
    There is a 63 Lark 4-door 259 auto in town with only 54,000. This thing has been sitting outside for 4 years getting covered with mildew. The car is still nice though and could use a refreshening (buffing). The only thing it really needs is a new trunk lid and a tune-up. The floors are SOLID and the interior is nice. I would buy it, but I already have enough on my plate.
    Alex, sent you a PM.

    Russ Farris

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Andrews View Post
    Here's the car I mentioned in my above post #23 above, taken August '07:

    'Couldn't be the same car, Bob. The car Rick had in South Bend had absolutely no top; the bows were rusted but still usable. Further, "your" car, here, looks twice as solid! <GGG> BP

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  • Bob Andrews
    replied
    Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
    Anybody else know of any Studebakers that survived the period of just being old used cars, were rescued, got safely within SDC, but were later "lost" anyway?

    Reason I ask: I've often reflected on what I thought was a terrible waste of a black 1962 Daytona convertible, 289/225/4-speed. It was understandably sold as a parts car at the May South Bend Swap Meet by used-car dealer friend Rick Crawley of Logansport IN maybe 8 years ago.

    Like so many of us have, Rick had watched the car deteriorate alongside a shed by the railroad tracks in Logansport for years, unable to buy it, until there wasn't enough of it left to restore. He finally did buy it and drug it onto his trailer (the tub almost broke in two) for the short trip north to South Bend for parting out. I think someone in Wisconsin bought the mostly-stripped hulk to contribute bits and pieces for another 1962 Daytona convertible being restored.

    That seemed like such a terrible shame, and I've never forgotten it. It seems like once a nice car gets into the club, especially something as desirable as a black, red/white interior 289/225/4-speed Daytona convertible, that it should at least see indoor storage so it doesn't deteriorate too much from that point on...yet this one became a hulk so rusty it was only good for bits and pieces a couple decades after it had been displayed at an SDC National Meet.

    Thoughts or parallels, anyone? BP

    Here's the car I mentioned in my above post #23 above, taken August '07:

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by studegary View Post
    Is this another Canadian thing? I do not believe that there were any 1967-1968 Monaco convertibles in the USA.
    I guess so!!! I was unaware of that exclusivity, really. But Google is your friend: http://wjenterprisesautomotive.smugm...15139891_oKAEd

    Craig

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    LOL! Man, that's the truth! There was a 55 President Coupe here locally - the owner had really done a nice job making it look like new. I happened to spot it one day when I chanced by while the garage door was open. I talked to this gent about the car and asked why I'd never seen it around town or at any local shows....... "OH! I'm saving it for my grandson. As soon as he gets his drivers license, it's his!"
    Two years later, grandson had that car. Grandpa finally reclaimed his gem after the kid had wreaked holy hell on it. Bought the kid a VW bug - which was what he'd wanted in the first place. Not some stupid ol' beast he had to actually treat with respect.

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  • JBOYLE
    replied
    Around here we have a lot of "Grandpa cars".

    When I was in high school, a neighbor kid (well on his way to being a thug, drunk and druggie) got his grandfather's nice 64-65 Mercury.
    Took him all of a month to total it.
    Then he moved onto Datsun 1600-2000 convertibles and he wrecked a couple of them.

    I hate to say it, buit if you want your cars to outlast you, unless you have a grandson like Matthew, don't expect your grandkids to treasure any cars you leave them.
    As much as we'd like to think that they'll treasure the Lark or Hawk, wax it weekly and join the club, the sad fact is give any kid a car and they'll use it as a daily driver and drive/race/wreck it into the ground.
    Last edited by JBOYLE; 11-19-2011, 02:00 PM.

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  • 61Lark
    replied
    Originally posted by studegary View Post
    Perhaps you do not remember that in the earlier days of SDC, more of the cars at SDC International Meets were every day cars and were not show cars. For example, in 1971/1972, we drove and entered, Cathy's everyday use car, a 1963 Daytona Wagonaire. I do not even own a car that new now.
    I have to agree with Gary. The assumption is that this was a nice car at one time. To quote the October 2011 Turning Wheels, "Perhaps intimidated somewhat by the beautifully restored Studebakers at an International Meet or not quite ready to do serious battle in competitive judging, many attendees opt to DISPLAY ONLY their pride and joy."

    I have a 56 Power Hawk that appears to have been fixed up in the late sixties, but isn't much more than a parts car now, and a 63 Lark that was a nice car in the eighties, but isn't much to look at after the mice and pigeons have had their way with it.

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    I have a couple more tales that are relevant here - both concerning Studes in my past.

    The first one was my second Stude I fixed up - one 1952 Champion 4-door. I re-did EVERYTHING mechanical on that car. Man, it was one sweet-drivin' machine. An upholsterer friend of mine completely did the interior, and all it lacked was to have it's tired gray paint revived. I drove that car for a year or more after having literally saved it right out of a junkyard. With a different Stude in my sights, I sold that '52 to a fella that was doing a bullet-nosed Starlight coupe. He scavenged the fresh drivetrain, brakes and whatnot outta the '52 and used them in his '51. He sold the interior out of it, and ditched the hulk back into a junkyard! His car - his choice, but I razzed him for some time later about shooting a perfectly good car in the head.

    Then there was the '55 Commander coupe I re-did from stem to stern. I found this one sitting behind an auto parts store in Atlanta. Once I was done with that one, I drove it daily for some time. It ran and drove just fine, but I just couldn't warm up to that car. When the son of a friend expressed interest in it, I was quick to sell it to him. He wasn't some irresponsible kid - but he beat that car to death in short order. I don't know what it's ultimate fate was, but it did bug me to see that thing degrade after he bought it from me.

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
    Gary makes a good opoint in Post #36, for that was true in the earlier days of SDC.

    Of course, in my original post that opened this topic, I was lamenting the fate of a premium-model Studebaker with a dash plaque affixed that indicated it really had reached the status of "I am loved," since someone once cared enough for it to display it at a National Meet...and then affix the dash plaque from that meet as testimony.

    Good discussions, here. BP
    Perhaps you do not remember that in the earlier days of SDC, more of the cars at SDC International Meets were every day cars and were not show cars. For example, in 1971/1972, we drove and entered, Cathy's everyday use car, a 1963 Daytona Wagonaire. I do not even own a car that new now.

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  • showbizkid
    replied
    On the way to my son's high school, there lives a hot rodder with a gorgeous yellow Deuce roadster in his garage. This story is not about that car. This is about the truly lovely '61 Impala Sport Coupe that has sat in his dirt front yard, unmoving, for at least 5 years. It does not move, is not covered, has weeds growing up around it, and I get angry every time I pass by it - which I do every single day. I saw this car before it was parked, getting gas at my local Costco, and remarked to the owner what a gorgeous car he had. Then, a year later, I see it like this.

    It's still saveable, but I see the rust bubbles starting under that gorgeous blue paint; the rear wheelwells are becoming havens for the tinworm and I'm sure the undercarriage has soaked up a lot of moisture. I have no doubt that car will still be there in a year when my boy graduates, and probably long past that.

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Gary makes a good opoint in Post #36, for that was true in the earlier days of SDC.

    Of course, in my original post that opened this topic, I was lamenting the fate of a premium-model Studebaker with a dash plaque affixed that indicated it really had reached the status of "I am loved," since someone once cared enough for it to display it at a National Meet...and then affix the dash plaque from that meet as testimony.

    Good discussions, here. BP

    Leave a comment:

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