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Studes that "made it" but were nonetheless lost...

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  • #16
    Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
    What color was that particular car? I did see one in that area in 1993; basically a parts car. I know it was a 'late' car because of the Olive Green Metallic color.

    Craig
    White, black vinyl roof, gold brocade upholstery and probably every available option.

    Terry

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    • #17
      From Bob K, above:

      "It was on this day - my first of what would be YEARS of scouring these yards - that I saw a Stude set out for picking with a Studebaker Drivers Club decal (or two) on cars that sometimes were missing NOTHING but someone to love them!"


      Yep, Bob; those are the toughest ones (and the topic de jour); cars that ran the used car gauntlet to be welcomed by an SDCer, then allowed to become junk. Phooey. BP

      Last edited by BobPalma; 11-18-2011, 12:26 PM.
      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

      Ayn Rand:
      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

      Comment


      • #18
        There were a few that yielded tech manuals in the back seat or trunk. Old copies of Turning Wheels, Stude meet paperwork..... Just used to boggle my mind that these cars had once had an owner affiliated with SDC and yet still ended up in a junkyard!

        Heh - I'm genuinely sorry I recalled that gorgeous '58 President I came across. I remember telling Jon Myers about it as I used to sell him alot of parts I got from those yards. But as I said, at that time the poor 58 sedans didn't rate with most Stude folks. I know he never went after anything off that particular car. I actually would find out from him about a given yard that had a Stude or three in it. Folks would call him and alert him about such, but he didn't have the time to go and strip stuff, so sometimes he'd tell me and I'd go scavenge what I knew he'd be willing to buy - then I'd sell the stuff to him for a handsome profit. We both made money that way. By the late 90s tho - a Stude coming into one of those yards was the exception.
        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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        • #19
          I once parted out a 66 Sports sedan back in 1972 or so. I'll never forget noticing the shiny paint on the floors as I cut it up with a torch to fit in the metal dumpster. It was a perfect car, just missing the drive line and worth nothing in the 70's because of the $15 sheet metal and bumpers from Standard Surplus.
          JDP Maryland

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          • #20
            Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
            I believe Gary has one about a nice '62 G.T.Hawk that was left as an inheritance to someone who then drove it daily, including two winters in the salt which finished it off.

            Craig
            Yes, that 1962 Hawk was purchased new by a doctor that had several cars and his office was in his home so the cars did not get a lot of use. He bought new Imperials for his first car use. My 1967 Imperial Crown Coupe was one that he bought new. When the doctor died, the Hawk looked like new and had very few miles (less than 30K, IIRC). I, and others, tried to buy the car. The son, a New York State Trooper, looked at the Hawk as a new car to use. He beat it to death in two or three years.

            I have owned and known of many Studebakers that were nice cars in the 1970s-1980s and were just used up or destroyed (sometimes unfinished projects).
            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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            • #21
              Two GT Hawks around here were found, lost, then found again. One spent years in a backyard as a spite item following a divorce; it then got acquired by a collector who didn't generally drive anything, but at least was indoors most of that period. It now belongs to an SDCer in Burlington, and I've had the pleasure of driving it myself four or five times! Another was acquired, a refurb was begun, but the owner then lost interest, and the car wound up vandalized in a back alley. Another gent from the neighbourhood talked the P/O into selling it, and got it back on the road in 2010; it is an ongoing restoration project/driver...

              I think that '59 Lark wagon hulk I photographed a couple years ago near Paris, ON, had an SDC sticker on a window. Felt badly about that one...I like two-door wagons and that one had once been such a neat little car!

              S.

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              • #22
                That seemed like such a terrible shame, and I've never forgotten it. It seems like once a nice car gets into the club, especially something as desirable as a black, red/white interior 289/225/4-speed Daytona convertible, that it should at least see indoor storage so it doesn't deteriorate too much from that point on...yet this one became a hulk so rusty it was only good for bits and pieces a couple decades after it had been displayed at an SDC National Meet.
                Here's one speculation: could this car have been a flood victim? In 2003, the town south of here, High River, actually lived up to its name and received its '100 year' flood that spring. A few months later, the local PYP yard ended up with several of these flood damaged cars. Most of them were maybe 10 year old Cavaliers, Honda Civics, etc., but I do remember a '68 Dodge Monaco convertible in there as well. The giveaway of course were the water damaged interiors with 3 inches dried silt on the floors, and surface rust in places it wouldn't otherwise rust, water-filled guages, et al. Was there any evidence of that on this Daytona?

                Craig

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                • #23
                  Bob, as to your OP: when I bought the Skytop parts car from Kent Fedor, he talked me into making a side trip along the way to the UP of MI to Brad Daugherty's house to bring him a black '62 Daytona conv. corpse that was pretty rough; no engine/trans. but otherwise mostly there. Brad had intended to transfer all the conv.-specific parts to a hardtop donor; but lost interest in Larks and sold the hulk to Kent. Kent told me he intended to restore it, but it seemed to far gone to me, even for a convertible. Wonder if that's the car you're thinking of- and what he ever did with it...

                  Best thing that came of it was, the other car that Brad was going to use as the subject was a rock-solid '62 Daytona shell from CO that was a factory 4-speed car; I fell in love with it and bought it and it is now the basis of my r2 Daytona Skytop dream car project

                  When I get home next week I'll post the one picture of the vert I took.
                  Proud NON-CASO

                  I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                  If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                  GOD BLESS AMERICA

                  Ephesians 6:10-17
                  Romans 15:13
                  Deuteronomy 31:6
                  Proverbs 28:1

                  Illegitimi non carborundum

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                  • #24
                    I have a '60 V8 four door Lark that used to belong to an SDC member long deceased. His daughter was given the car to use during high school. By the time I discovered the car (mid 1980's) the daughter had become a mother. She had offered the Lark to her daughter to drive to school. The daughter did not want it. Unfortunately, this former daughter of an early SDC member had not had the best breaks in life. Her last husband could only supply her a house that sat on wheels. Having a garage to park the car out of the elements was out of the question.

                    By the time I found the Lark, it was in sad shape. It was in the fall, and oak leaves were piled up to the doors.

                    I brought the car back to make a fairly nice driver, but have now had it parked for over 16 years. (out of the elements) It could be made into a nice driver again, but now it will need paint, a headliner, door panels, and a little floor work.


                    Life happens, just because one family member values and cares for these cars with excitement and passion, does not mean that anyone else in the family cares. There is a large segment of our society that will forever look at these cars as "old" and odd. Two cars I have, were bought from the estate of a collector, who valued and cherished them. When he died, his family couldn't get rid of them fast enough. They would have been just as quick to sell them to a scrap yard as to me.


                    Then there is the "all show and no go" restorations. That is the car that is given a cursory restoration without doing the hard technical preparation. They look good for two are three shows (or years) and too soon the glued in headliner is falling down, paint is bubbling, and the rusty frame is sagging.
                    John Clary
                    Greer, SC

                    SDC member since 1975

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      JDPs tale of the 66 made me think about the one I had in the late 70s. I can't honestly remember if I paid something for that Daytona or not. But yeah, that sucker had gorgeous floorboards and everything else - shy of it's engine. I do remember the guy I got it from intimating that the ONLY thing it had been good for was it's good-running 283 - which ended up in his Chevy PU. I passed that car to another SDCer when I left Georgia in '81. It was dark metallic blue with a white vinyl roof. Really pretty. Maybe ROADRACELARK will recall what ever happened to that car.
                      Last edited by Roscomacaw; 11-18-2011, 04:17 PM. Reason: typo
                      No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
                        Here's one speculation: could this car have been a flood victim? In 2003, the town south of here, High River, actually lived up to its name and received its '100 year' flood that spring. A few months later, the local PYP yard ended up with several of these flood damaged cars. Most of them were maybe 10 year old Cavaliers, Honda Civics, etc., but I do remember a '68 Dodge Monaco convertible in there as well. The giveaway of course were the water damaged interiors with 3 inches dried silt on the floors, and surface rust in places it wouldn't otherwise rust, water-filled guages, et al. Was there any evidence of that on this Daytona?

                        Craig
                        Not really, Craig.

                        What probably did the car in faster than otherwise was its open proximity to the railroad tracks on the heavily-traveled line through Logansport. You know; the various quantities of dirt, dust, and airborn toxins that would attend being near a railroad track, unprotected.

                        (This per Rick Crawley; I never saw the car where Rick picked it up.) BP
                        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                        Ayn Rand:
                        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by jclary View Post
                          I have a '60 V8 four door Lark that used to belong to an SDC member long deceased. His daughter was given the car to use during high school. By the time I discovered the car (mid 1980's) the daughter had become a mother. She had offered the Lark to her daughter to drive to school. The daughter did not want it. Unfortunately, this former daughter of an early SDC member had not had the best breaks in life. Her last husband could only supply her a house that sat on wheels. Having a garage to park the car out of the elements was out of the question.

                          By the time I found the Lark, it was in sad shape. It was in the fall, and oak leaves were piled up to the doors.

                          I brought the car back to make a fairly nice driver, but have now had it parked for over 16 years. (out of the elements) It could be made into a nice driver again, but now it will need paint, a headliner, door panels, and a little floor work.
                          That sounds remarkably similar to a story here in the early 1980's; only this car was one of those rare 1964-1/2 Commander "Specials" with the Daytona interior. She was also a single mom who was given this car by her grandfather, and drove it 'everywhere' winter and summer until all that was left of the poor thing was a rusted out hulk. In 1990, it ended up at a local autowreckers; the floors and trunk floor long rusted away.

                          Craig

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                          • #28
                            Craig, after re-reading my original post, I see that saying my car would need door panels could be misunderstood. The metal door skins are pretty good. I should have written that it would need the inside upholstered door panels. Although my car is now out of the elements, my rather drafty man cave is far from a well enclosed heated garage. However, it's better than nothing.
                            John Clary
                            Greer, SC

                            SDC member since 1975

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by jclary View Post
                              Craig, after re-reading my original post, I see that saying my car would need door panels could be misunderstood. The metal door skins are pretty good. I should have written that it would need the inside upholstered door panels. Although my car is now out of the elements, my rather drafty man cave is far from a well enclosed heated garage. However, it's better than nothing.
                              Yep, yours is an excellent example of a car being brought back from the brink before its too late, which is fortunate. The sad part is the car here was too far gone, even though both cars had owners in similar circumstances.

                              Craig

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                              • #30
                                I had a hard time dealing with this type thing early on. Not just Studes, but lots of others. My Dad ran a salvage yard, and I had the Idea that I could save soooo many that eventually went to the crusher. Two of many I remember, and still get sad adout today, is Dad's old M-15 Studebaker wrecker, and a 40 Ford coupe, I worked on for 4 years, and they both evenually went to the burn and torch death. (what they did before crushing)

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