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Studes that "made it" but were nonetheless lost...

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  • Studes that "made it" but were nonetheless lost...

    Anybody else know of any Studebakers that survived the period of just being old used cars, were rescued, got safely within SDC, but were later "lost" anyway?

    Reason I ask: I've often reflected on what I thought was a terrible waste of a black 1962 Daytona convertible, 289/225/4-speed. It was understandably sold as a parts car at the May South Bend Swap Meet by used-car dealer friend Rick Crawley of Logansport IN maybe 8 years ago.

    Like so many of us have, Rick had watched the car deteriorate alongside a shed by the railroad tracks in Logansport for years, unable to buy it, until there wasn't enough of it left to restore. He finally did buy it and drug it onto his trailer (the tub almost broke in two) for the short trip north to South Bend for parting out. I think someone in Wisconsin bought the mostly-stripped hulk to contribute bits and pieces for another 1962 Daytona convertible being restored.

    The heartbreaker about this car Rick hauled from Logansport was that it had an SDC National Meet plaque on the glove box door, indicating it had been displayed at the SDC National Meet in South Bend (in the late 1960s, IIRC). The plaque was thoroughly pitted and deteriorated from open-air exposure to Logansport's north central Indiana climate, as was the rest of the interior, because the top was long gone.

    Virtually all extant Studebakers, save a few that have been cared for by original owners or people who bought them "right away" as good used cars and set them aside, went through a period in life where they were just old cars to be used up.

    But I thought, gosh, here is what had to have been a nice 1962 Daytona Convertible at one time that "made it" into SDC and was subsequently displayed at a National Meet, yet fell into disuse anyway and was allowed to fall prey to the elements even after it had been in SDC as a nice car...and a collectible Daytona convertible to boot!

    That seemed like such a terrible shame, and I've never forgotten it. It seems like once a nice car gets into the club, especially something as desirable as a black, red/white interior 289/225/4-speed Daytona convertible, that it should at least see indoor storage so it doesn't deteriorate too much from that point on...yet this one became a hulk so rusty it was only good for bits and pieces a couple decades after it had been displayed at an SDC National Meet.

    Thoughts or parallels, anyone? BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 11-18-2011, 04:48 AM.
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    I believe Gary has one about a nice '62 G.T.Hawk that was left as an inheritance to someone who then drove it daily, including two winters in the salt which finished it off.

    Craig

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
      >>>Thoughts<<<anyone? BP
      Sad, very sad indeed!!! Unfortunately, BPLost & Found Stude Forum

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Welcome View Post
        Sad, very sad indeed!!! Unfortunately, BP there have been similar scenarios with other Studes …and likely will be repeated thousands of more times.

        Perhaps in little over a month when our "new" SDC WebMaster takes a "new" look at our website & Forums, he will do some "new" things like; add a "Lost & Found Stude Forum" so we all could post and read about any Studes found/seen wasting away and/or help others find their lost Stude loves.

        Just a thought…
        For the one Bob mentioned it might need a "Found and Lost" forum.
        Joe Roberts
        '61 R1 Champ
        '65 Cruiser
        Eastern North Carolina Chapter

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
          Thoughts or parallels, anyone? BP
          On the other hand, I'm happy to read about cars that have been 'brought back from the brink' like this Rosebud '56 GH that was discussed here about a year ago:

          http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...hlight=rosebud

          Craig

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JRoberts View Post
            For the one Bob mentioned it might need a "Found and Lost" forum.
            Good one, Joe! BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #7
              I think sometimes we re-do a car only to be so completely happy with it that it no longer is a restoration, but it becomes a daily driver to the point we ruin it - hopefully only to restore it again. I did this twice to my Hawk which I have had since around 1979.

              At this point, however, I will never even allow "The Hawk" to get wet. I have finally reached a point that I enjoy owning it more than than I enjoy driving it. (OH BOY THAT SHOULD SET OFF SOME COMMENTS). I do believe some of these cars literally get "LOVED TO DEATH".

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              • #8
                I dunno Bob...
                Some of us aren't aging so gracefully, either...
                Time is relentless...
                HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                Jeff


                Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
                  I dunno Bob...
                  Some of us aren't aging so gracefully, either...
                  Time is relentless...
                  Well, Jeffster, I'm certainly glad you qualified your statement by saying, "some of us...." <GGG> BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Geez! I'm not sure I wanna depress myself that much. 19 years ago, I discovered one of - if not the first - Pick-A-Part yard in Wilmington, California. I had acquired a '64 Chyrsler Imperial Crown Coupe that needed only a working PS pump to be operable. I'd paid $300 for the REALLY sweet-looking Imp, and my CASO consciousness balked at the notion that would be $90 bucks for a rebuilt unit. The parts place guy - sensing my lockage - mentioned that he'd heard about a "yard" in Wilmington where one pulled whatever stuff he needed and paid a very meager price for it. He had NOT mis-characterized the place!
                    I went there on a Saturday morning and was totally blown away by what I found. This operation was FULL of oldies. FULL of them! I found and pulled an obviously freshly rebuilt PS pump and paid under $10 dollars for it. I was hooked.
                    But even before I pulled the pump off a donor Imperial, what caught my eyes caused my jaw to drop to where I damned near tripped over it! Just outside the area where you could scavenge parts, there was the area where previously picked over cars were literally stacked up awaiting their being fed to the crusher. There were hundreds of hulks (actually, "hulks" is a misnomer because alot of the cars were only lightly scavenged-to-practically complete) awaiting their final fate. To this DAY - I can still see that red '58 Packard J-body sitting atop several other Studes.
                    I walked over to the fence and stared up at that beauty. It looked like if they'd set it back on the ground, it might only require a battery to drive it off. Once I got my lower jaw back in place, I discovered that there was a section of the yard just for orphans. Studebakers, AMCs (even tho they weren't technically orphans in '82), Hudsons and the like - would end up in that section. That particular day there were about 10 Studes in the mix. Ramblers making up the balance. It was on this day - my first of what would be YEARS of scouring these yards - that I saw a Stude set out for picking with a Studebaker Drivers Club decal (or two) on cars that sometimes were missing NOTHING but someone to love them!
                    When I went up to one of the pay windows with my PS pump, I asked to speak to one of the managers. I was desperate to know if I could swing a deal on the 58 Packard hordtop. Heh - I remember the emotion and pleading I laid on that fella - trying my BEST to convince him of the rarity and value of that S-P gem. He wouldn't budge from his "No". They bought many of these cars with no paperwork whatsoever - and there was NO WAY they were gonna bother to re-establish such on something that had been bought primarily as scrap potential - period.

                    As the years progressed - and these help yourself yards flourished in the LA basin, they started to offer some of the nicer -intact - collector cars IF they'd lucked into a title when it was bought by the yard. (And I don't know what they're payin' for "junk" cars nowdays, but it used to be they NEVER paid more than $150 for one - and if it was missing so much as a wheel or the air cleaner - that was valid reason to offer even less!) Anyway, I recall a GT Hawk that was for sale at one yard out near Ontario (Calif.) that had a price of $700 on it. It had whacked something with it's right front fender and that had pushed the fender back to where you couldn't open the right door. That appeard to be ALL that ailed that Hawk. Nice white paint. Perfect black interior, 4-spd, buckets, all gages, and SDC stickers on the front and rear windshields! How the HELL did this car not get saved by a fellow SDC person??? There were other examples like this, but this one sticks out in my mind to this day.
                    Where I live now, I've found other Studes with SDC stickers, badges and such in states of disrepair and decay. Two that come to mind were a 4-spd '61 Hawk and a '58 Commander 4-dr that set waiting in a weedy field. Just not enough money, space and time to save them all. Although, I DO know (cause I ultimately had a hand in it) that the '58 got revived. Last I heard it was still using it's 259 to get around in the hands of a non-Stude type. The '61 Hawk was less than a parts car when I last saw it. But the SDC decals were still visible on the vent windows.

                    EDIT: I just remembered this one, and I have to tell about it. Some of you MAY remember me telling of this car in years past, but I just now remembered it - and I'm sure that's because my brain has TRIED to forget the injustice of this incident....

                    One of these P-A-P yards was square in the middle of a metropolitan area - no doubt it had been a wrecking yard before the town grew up around it. It's Stanton, Calif, by the way.
                    As these yards went, the Stanton yard was rather small, but that didn't mean I wouldn't find some gems there on occassion! I walked in there one day and just a couple of rows into the yard, I see it! There sits a '58 President hardtop - White W/red - missing not ONE part. CLEAN inside and out - not a dent, not a scratch, not rust bubble one! I think even the battery hold-down was there.
                    On this one, I ran straight back to the front office and started pleading. Even tho we lived in a mobile home court at the time, I would FIND A WAY to keep and love this baby if I could just get my hands on it. Heh - they wouldn't even listen to me. I stood there offering 4-figure purchase monies (knowing they had a fraction of such invested in the thing), and they wouldn't budge. I ended up taking the radio out of it. And I pointedly did not go back there for a few months - not wanting to have to look at it. Remember, of course, this was in the mid-80s and the '58 sedans were personna-non-grata for all but the few of us SDCers that admired them. <sigh> Almost wish I hadn't remembered that one.
                    Last edited by Roscomacaw; 11-18-2011, 08:57 AM. Reason: additional recollections
                    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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                    • #11
                      Speaking of 62 Daytonas....

                      back around 1979-1980 a friend told me about a 62 Daytona parked on a hill behing a farmstead east of Prague, NE. I went to the area with my father a little later to look for the Daytona and found members of the extended family that had a number of Larks but never got back up there because sometimes life takes funny twists and turns.

                      Around 1995, I got back up there and bought a number of Champ trucks to build one good one and later bought some Lark parts cars and I finally discovered which farm had the 62 Daytona.

                      I did not get back up to the Prague area until the early 2000s and finally got up to the Daytona that I had learned about back in 1979. I don't know what the car might have looked like 20 years earlier but by the time I finally saw the Daytona in person it was a parts car at worst.

                      While composing this note I pulled up the area on Google maps and nothing is as I recall in the area but I think I saw a Lark in somebody's yard from x thousand feet

                      But the moral of this story is... if you get a line of a parts car or restorable car, go after it. sometimes tomorrow never comes

                      Jeff T.
                      \"I\'m getting nowhere as fast as I can\"
                      The Replacements.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A 66 Cruiser that had "historic" significance here. It was the last new Studebaker sold in Vancouver by the city's oldest and only remaining Studebaker dealer. The car was purchased new by a lifelong Studebaker owner in the summer of 67. He joined our chapter in the early 70's. He was in his 70's and in frail health. As longe ashe could, he came to our meetings, but eventually health issues meant he could no longer drive and the car disappeared. It was always immaculate. I would sure like to know if it is still around.

                        Terry

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                        • #13
                          pics from 1982 Seattle National meet?

                          1982 was my second big meet, I was just a kid.. Kind of an overcast showery morning. As the day went on, it warmed up. This was the first meet I was old enough to take note of what I was seeing.

                          A late arrival to the meet, 1962 Daytona Skytop, 289, 4 speed shows up. One of the nicest cars at the show. The owner was late, and not happy he could not get judged. He leaves early.




                          Fastforward to 2003 I find the same car, top leaky, windows busted out, sitting in a warehouse parking lot. There was plenty of room inside, not sure why this car is outdoors..

                          I made a deal and brought it home.


                          Does anyone have a photo of this beautiful car as is once was??

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                          • #14
                            My 1962 Lark: had it 'lived' in the Rust Belt; it probably wouldn't be around to tell its tale.

                            The last time it was tagged was sometime in the 1970's judging by its green/yellow Arizona license plate.

                            Long story short: the car came to me with a clear title, all good glass and about 99.5% rust free.
                            --------------------------------------

                            Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                            Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                            "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dictator27 View Post
                              A 66 Cruiser that had "historic" significance here. It was the last new Studebaker sold in Vancouver by the city's oldest and only remaining Studebaker dealer. The car was purchased new by a lifelong Studebaker owner in the summer of 67. He joined our chapter in the early 70's. He was in his 70's and in frail health. As longe ashe could, he came to our meetings, but eventually health issues meant he could no longer drive and the car disappeared. It was always immaculate. I would sure like to know if it is still around.
                              What color was that particular car? I did see one in that area in 1993; basically a parts car. I know it was a 'late' car because of the Olive Green Metallic color.

                              Craig

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