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Story on the Hamilton plant....with extras <g>

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  • Story on the Hamilton plant....with extras <g>

    Here's a good read with pictures that was just released by a student who did a qrite up on the Studebaker plant and the Hamilton Chapter gave him a had supplying cars and a few veteran workers............enjoy

    http://autos.sympatico.ca/features/9...ry-in-hamilton
    sigpic

    Home of the Fried Green Tomato

    "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

    1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

  • #2
    Originally posted by 2R5 View Post
    Here's a good read with pictures that was just released by a student who did a qrite up on the Studebaker plant and the Hamilton Chapter gave him a had supplying cars and a few veteran workers............enjoy

    http://autos.sympatico.ca/features/9...ry-in-hamilton
    Nice writeup indeed. I was fortunate enough to have visited the factory in May '64 when I picked up my '64 Daytona Wagonaire at Hamilton for a drive-away delivery. I had taken a couple trains from Kansas City, MO to Buffalo, NY. Then I took a bus from Buffalo to Hamilton. The bus driver let me off at the street where the plant was located and I walked the several blocks to the plant office. I was given a first class tour of the plant and I was very impressed at how clean and modern it looked. I was convinced that the Hamilton cars were better built than those from South Bend. My only disappointment was in the fewer options that were available at the Hamilton plant (no 289s with overdrive, no reclining bucket seats, tinted windshields only, no factory air, no Hill Holders). After my plant tour the man who had escorted me volunteered to guide me through Hamilton to the west side where I could pick up the expressway to Detroit. A pleasant drive it was, but I had to spend the night in Windsor because I was too late to clear customs. Then the customs guy was about two hours late opening, but I got through OK and headed across to Detroit. Going through Detroit I "christened" the car early on. A low boy carrying a track loader dropped a chunk of mud/rock off the back on the trailer and it put a star in my brand new windshield. Rest of the trip was uneventful, but one week later the overdrive self-destructed. Seems the guys at Hamilton forgot to put any oil in it. Taken care of under warranty, but cost me some time without the car. I did get a factory a/c installed at the dealer as well as a Hill Holder and a right headrest, part of the original deal.
    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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    • #3
      great story , but I'd of thought that a tranny without oil wouldn't have got you as far as Windsor ??
      sigpic

      Home of the Fried Green Tomato

      "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

      1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

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      • #4
        Excellent story!
        The only difference between death and taxes is that death does not grow worse every time Congress convenes. - Will Rogers

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 2R5 View Post
          great story , but I'd of thought that a tranny without oil wouldn't have got you as far as Windsor ??
          I've always wondered about that myself, but that's what the dealer's shop foreman told me. It must have had some oil, but maaybe not enough. They had to order a complete transmission unit as it was damaged too.
          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
          '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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          • #6
            Great Read Bob, Thanks for an interesting post

            Murray
            Life isn't about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain !

            http://sites.google.com/site/intrigu...tivehistories/

            (/url) https://goo.gl/photos/ABBDQLgZk9DyJGgr5

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            • #7
              Very well done. Many thanks.

              Rog
              '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
              Smithtown,NY
              Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

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              • #8
                Actually a tranny sans fluid that didn't self-destruct was the proximate cause for my acquisition of a Studebaker! My old Plymouth Neon was having tranny trouble and I figured on having to replace it (the car, that is, since it was probably not worth replacing the tranny in a car that by 2007 wasn't worth much). Mechanic pointed out that I was driving around with a dry tranny. I'd gone to and from Ottawa twice that way. Yikes. He refilled the trans and the car was...just fine! Within days I was shopping for a Studebaker, now that I didn't have to acquire something new...

                S.

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                • #9
                  Cheeky comment by Art Unger that we Studebaker Drivers are sometimes antisocial, imagine that!!! Then again when you drive the world's best cars who needs to be sociable? :-)~
                  John Clements
                  Christchurch, New Zealand

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                  • #10
                    Hey everybody

                    Originally posted by 2R5 View Post
                    Here's a good read with pictures that was just released by a student who did a qrite up on the Studebaker plant and the Hamilton Chapter gave him a had supplying cars and a few veteran workers............enjoy

                    http://autos.sympatico.ca/features/9...ry-in-hamilton
                    I'm really surprised that so few members have viewed this thread. It contains so much interesting material on the Hamilton plant and facilities, plus over two dozen great pictures. It's almost like going to a large meet or small zone meet. Take a few minutes and have a look. You'll be glad you did!
                    Stu Chapman

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Stu Chapman View Post
                      I'm really surprised that so few members have viewed this thread. It contains so much interesting material on the Hamilton plant and facilities, plus over two dozen great pictures. It's almost like going to a large meet or small zone meet. Take a few minutes and have a look. You'll be glad you did! Stu Chapman
                      Good points, Stu; the article is incredibly interesting.

                      By the way, I didn't realize you and David Blackmer (my interview of David in the July 2009 Turning Wheels) are about the same age. This article says you were 29 in 1963 and David was 30 until his 31st birthday in November 1963....and you were both doing similar work for Studebaker; one in Canada and one in southern California.

                      What a big Studebaker world for such youngsters! <GGG> BP
                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                        Good points, Stu; the article is incredibly interesting.

                        By the way, I didn't realize you and David Blackmer (my interview of David in the July 2009 Turning Wheels) are about the same age. This article says you were 29 in 1963 and David was 30 until his 31st birthday in November 1963....and you were both doing similar work for Studebaker; one in Canada and one in southern California.

                        What a big Studebaker world for such youngsters! <GGG> BP
                        Bob, one major reason that I went to Studebaker was the fact they had such confidence in bringing in young men, unlike the majors manufacturers, The gamble was really worth it to me as it prepared me well for my subsequent future.
                        Stu Chapman

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