Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why is the Ranchero considered the first American coupe utility vehicle over a Coupe Express?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
    Rog, I think the car and engine were good enough for their day; that really wasn't the "problem" per se. The problem was that the car was far too expensive for what it was in an era when pricing was becoming a big issue.

    In 1916, they had taken on Ford's Model T with the Chevrolet 490, so named for its $490 price. It was successful and started them on their ultimate road to being a highly-competitive low-price car. However, some marketing genius got the idea that they'd also move up-market the next year with the V8, priced at $1,385; almost three times the "490s" price!

    That may have been the time when some wag coined the phrase, "What's wrong with this picture?" <GGG> BP
    As I mentioned in an earlier post, Volkswagen made the exact same mistake almost 90 years later with their Phaeton; a well-built, well-equipped sedan that listed for over $100K with the W12 engine. Nice car and all, but it was well out Volkswagen's perceived market.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by raprice View Post
    Just for the record, the first Chevrolet V-8 was 1917. It wasn't very good.
    Rog
    Rog, I think the car and engine were good enough for their day; that really wasn't the "problem" per se. The problem was that the car was far too expensive for what it was in an era when pricing was becoming a big issue.

    In 1916, they had taken on Ford's Model T with the Chevrolet 490, so named for its $490 price. It was successful and started them on their ultimate road to being a highly-competitive low-price car. However, some marketing genius got the idea that they'd also move up-market the next year with the V8, priced at $1,385; almost three times the "490s" price!

    That may have been the time when some wag coined the phrase, "What's wrong with this picture?" <GGG> BP

    Leave a comment:


  • 52 Ragtop
    replied
    "For exactly the same reason the 1964 Pontiac LeMans with GTO package (it was not a separate model until 1966, contrary to popular belief) is generally accepted as the first muscle car, the 1963 Super Lark nothwithstanding...or any of a dozen other earlier cars, for that matter. BP"

    Ask Ron Johnson, his opinion is that the 1956 Golden Hawk IS the first muscle car!!

    Jim


    Leave a comment:


  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by raprice View Post
    Just for the record, the first Chevrolet V-8 was 1917. It wasn't very good.
    Rog
    This one put on a few miles:







    The exposed pushrods don't help any..



    Craig
    Last edited by 8E45E; 11-10-2011, 06:15 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • raprice
    replied
    Just for the record, the first Chevrolet V-8 was 1917. It wasn't very good.
    Rog

    Leave a comment:


  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by avantilover View Post
    I think the first "Ute" vehicle was designed and built by Lew Bandt of Ford Australia in the 1930s. he later died in it but it was restored. http://www.fastlane.com.au/Features/First_ute.htm
    Australia is the car-based truck (Ute) capital of the world! For years, there were, and still are car-based trucks you would never think of such as Armstrong-Siddeley who exclusively marketed them there. And Ford and Holden still have them on the market today. http://www.holden.com.au/vehicles/ute#/overview

    Craig
    Last edited by 8E45E; 11-10-2011, 04:59 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blue 15G
    replied
    I think it's because most hobbyists today are most familiar with post-WWII cars and don't know about many automotive "firsts" that occurred before the early 1940s.

    For example, everyone thinks Chevy's first V-8 was the 1955, but they also came out with one way back in their early days. (It was a real piece of junk too, IIRC what I read about it.)

    Dave Bonn
    '54 Champion Starliner

    Leave a comment:


  • avantilover
    replied
    I think the first "Ute" vehicle was designed and built by Lew Bandt of Ford Australia in the 1930s. he later died in it but it was restored. http://www.fastlane.com.au/Features/First_ute.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • kmac530
    replied
    Am I missing something?
    A ranchero and el camino are different than a Coupe Express or a Hudson Terraplane mainly because it is a one piece cab/bed vehichle like StudeMann said where the Coupe express has a separated bed.
    If you wanna spilt hairs and go way back, were not the teens and 20s Ford model A and model AA the same basic chassis and same hood, fenders, cowl, grill shell, and even doors?
    Wouldn't that make the early fords the first american coupe utility?

    Leave a comment:


  • CarCrosswordDan
    replied
    So few sold and most people alive can't remember that far back.

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Originally posted by DudeStude View Post
    Anyone know?
    For exactly the same reason the 1964 Pontiac LeMans with GTO package (it was not a separate model until 1966, contrary to popular belief) is generally accepted as the first muscle car, the 1963 Super Lark nothwithstanding...or any of a dozen other earlier cars, for that matter. BP

    Leave a comment:


  • 53k
    replied
    Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
    That is one parameter, and built on a passenger car frame. However, the first car-based pickup with an integrated body & box is the Crosley.

    Craig
    Probably true, but with thousands of different car manufacturers over the years... who knows?
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeMann View Post
    It probably has more to do with the fact that the Coupe Express had a separate bed from the cab whereas the Ranchero and El Camino had bed and body combined.
    That is one parameter, and built on a passenger car frame. However, the first car-based pickup with an integrated body & box is the Crosley.

    Craig

    Leave a comment:


  • Pat Dilling
    replied
    And the Hudson folks will argue that the Terraplane Pick up had Studebaker beat by at least a year... Here's a 1936

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    I think that's probably closer to the truth. In a word - ignorance. It's like my spreading the word about how Studes rule at the muscle car drags. You can see the degree of receptiveness in the eyes of non-Stude types. They pretty much figure I'm spreading something other than "the word". <G>

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X