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Why is the Ranchero considered the first American coupe utility vehicle over a Coupe Express?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by raprice View Post
    Just for the record, the first Chevrolet V-8 was 1917. It wasn't very good.
    Rog
    This one put on a few miles:







    The exposed pushrods don't help any..



    Craig
    Last edited by 8E45E; 11-10-2011, 05:15 AM.

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    • #17
      "For exactly the same reason the 1964 Pontiac LeMans with GTO package (it was not a separate model until 1966, contrary to popular belief) is generally accepted as the first muscle car, the 1963 Super Lark nothwithstanding...or any of a dozen other earlier cars, for that matter. BP"

      Ask Ron Johnson, his opinion is that the 1956 Golden Hawk IS the first muscle car!!

      Jim


      "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

      We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


      Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

      As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
      their Memorials!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by raprice View Post
        Just for the record, the first Chevrolet V-8 was 1917. It wasn't very good.
        Rog
        Rog, I think the car and engine were good enough for their day; that really wasn't the "problem" per se. The problem was that the car was far too expensive for what it was in an era when pricing was becoming a big issue.

        In 1916, they had taken on Ford's Model T with the Chevrolet 490, so named for its $490 price. It was successful and started them on their ultimate road to being a highly-competitive low-price car. However, some marketing genius got the idea that they'd also move up-market the next year with the V8, priced at $1,385; almost three times the "490s" price!

        That may have been the time when some wag coined the phrase, "What's wrong with this picture?" <GGG> BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
          Rog, I think the car and engine were good enough for their day; that really wasn't the "problem" per se. The problem was that the car was far too expensive for what it was in an era when pricing was becoming a big issue.

          In 1916, they had taken on Ford's Model T with the Chevrolet 490, so named for its $490 price. It was successful and started them on their ultimate road to being a highly-competitive low-price car. However, some marketing genius got the idea that they'd also move up-market the next year with the V8, priced at $1,385; almost three times the "490s" price!

          That may have been the time when some wag coined the phrase, "What's wrong with this picture?" <GGG> BP
          As I mentioned in an earlier post, Volkswagen made the exact same mistake almost 90 years later with their Phaeton; a well-built, well-equipped sedan that listed for over $100K with the W12 engine. Nice car and all, but it was well out Volkswagen's perceived market.

          Craig

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