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  • #16
    My father-in-law ( Daniel Papp) worked 2nd shift in the Studebaker foundry for many years, retired in the mid-fifties. My wife and I believe that he is the person shown in a photo that appears in the foundry section of the 1950 Studebaker factory booklet.

    34 Studebaker Street Rod (completed)
    55 Speedster (in work)
    63 Lark R2 (completed, 63K miles)
    64 Daytona CNV (completed, 63K miles)
    64 Avanti R2 (completed)
    85 Avanti(blackout trim, 10K miles)
    89 Avanti CNV (19K miles)

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    • #17
      [ St. Dyngus Day could be celebrated! I miss that annual fun time.

      http://southwest-gulf-sdc.org/[/QUOTE]

      I thought that was just a northern Indiana/South Bend exclusive holiday!!
      Chris Dresbach

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      • #18
        Originally posted by R2Andy View Post
        >>>The surname Nemeth is a very common Hungarian name around here and John is probably the most common given name among males of Hungarian background.
        Yes, this whole darn South Bend place is just crawling with Hungarians!!!

        In fact the very first person to Welcome me into this World exactly 66 years ago today, was a Hungarian ...YOUR GRANDFATHER, old Doc Petrass!!!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Chris_Dresbach View Post
          [ St. Dyngus Day could be celebrated! I miss that annual fun time.

          http://southwest-gulf-sdc.org/
          I thought that was just a northern Indiana/South Bend exclusive holiday!![/QUOTE]

          Chris: I lived over the border in Niles for 23 years and that is how I became acquainted with Dyngus Day in South Bend. I have not heard of it being celebrated in oher communities, but it could be. Maybe where the Hungarian ethnic group is better represented. Clippings from the SBT were given to some pubs on Fifth Avenue in Naples, as it would be a perfect venue for the polka music, brots, and beverages on that day...mild weather and open doors, etc. I could see it becoming a big whoopie annual event and it would have drawn a lot of tourists and money. They go big time for St. Patrick's Day, already. Apparently no one was interested. Sometimes my ideas are like that!
          "Growing old is mandatory, but growing up is optional." author unknown

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bob Bryant View Post
            I thought that was just a northern Indiana/South Bend exclusive holiday!!>>>
            "Dyngus (Dingus) Day" is Polish in origin, not Hungarian. It is celebrated on the Monday after Easter Sunday. With the very large influx of Polish immigrants to South Bend at the beginning of the last century; so too came the tradition of celebrating "Dyngus Day" here. Traditionally a holiday for fun, music, dancing, beer & of course, KEILBASA (polish sausage)!

            Over the decades, "Dyngus Day" evolved into a day when political hopefuls flock to South Bend to go around to these gatherings shaking hands, patting backs & that sort of thing before the May Primary Elections. Even former Studebaker UAW, Local # 5 negotiated "Dyngus Day" as one of the paid Holidays each year! It is now celebrated by just about every political and ethnic variant; so much so, they even arrive here by the "bus-load" Not to be left out, the African-American community of South Bend celebrate the same day, but they call it "Solidarity Day."

            South Bend even has adopted an official "Sister City" in Poland, but heck if I can spell it, let alone pronounce it!

            The Polish population of South Bend "WAS" concentrated on the south side of South Bend …and so "WAS" Studebakers! So if your Studebaker was built in South Bend, it likely has about a "30% Polish Content"…assembly wise, that is!!!
            Last edited by Welcome; 11-04-2011, 07:15 AM.

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            • #21
              Welcome: Interesting info on Dyngus Day and the local history. Many of the Europeans arriving in the country headed for large manufacturing and mining centers. When I lived in Gary I observed that there were many clubs for the different ethnic groups. Similar in South Bend. Maybe less so in Fort Wayne where the predominate group was from Germany. My wife's grandfather arrived from N. Ireland and went to Gary because it was a boom town in the 20's. Some of my favorite Italian restaurants were in Mishawaka. Sorry for getting away from the foundry question.
              "Growing old is mandatory, but growing up is optional." author unknown

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