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  • C-cab serial number

    Thanks to all of the help on this site, I have IDed my engine.
    I thought I had the body ID with no issue, but on another thread I started about my seat, Dwain G. got me questioning what year my cab actually is.

    He highlighted the early ashtray and some older style gauges in my truck and suggested it is possibly a '49.

    I do want to register it as acurately as possible. Is there a serial number search like there is the engine ID site here?

    Here is my tags info inside the foot step well:


    My tag serial number is: R10 8352
    model number on that tag says : 2R10-22
    Gross GVW: 6100lbs

    The other tag on the rear [art of the step well reads
    Model- 2R - C 2
    Cab No. 52265
    Trim No. 6033
    Paint No. 2202

    If someone can tell exactly what I have from this I would appreciate it, or direct me to where I can find it.
    I did read from a search I did {yes I did a search} that I can send off for a build sheet on my truck for $48 which I plan on doing, although not much is stock anymore, but I want to get it in my name ASAP and I only have one step left to plate, I dont think it is too late to change it if what I have is incorrect, but I do want to know.

    Help me and Dwain figure this out.

    Here is a link to the add for my ebay purchase with the only good pics I have of it:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eB...torefresh=true

  • #2
    Your truck's serial number falls into the middle of 1949 model 2R10 trucks. The starting serial number for 1950 model 2R10s was R10-20101. Stude made no attempt to coordinate the serial numbers of cabs with truck serials. There are photos of buildings full of cabs waiting to be installed, which were pulled from stock from the most convenient row. Cabs were serialized separately to allow dealers to keep track of running changes to cab features, all of which were/are documented in the 49-56 truck parts book.

    It is not unusual to find one of these trucks incorrectly registered. In many states (eg, California), vehicles were registered by engine number until the mid-1950s. This practice would then cause problems when the engine was replaced. Dealers were supposed to stamp the original engine number on the replacement block, but probably nobody did that if a used replacement engine came from a junk yard. Things were a lot more informal in those days. My 54 3R6 was registered as a 49 for reasons lost to history. With copies of an original Stude service letter, I was able to get the local DMV to change the registration year.
    Last edited by Skip Lackie; 10-31-2011, 07:02 AM. Reason: typo
    Skip Lackie

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    • #3
      OK, so now I hope I can get my registration guy to change the paper work.

      I am glad Dwain said something.

      Either way I just want it in my name asap, it is scary to be spending so much time and money on something without having a pink slip in hand.

      It sure seems odd that NOwhere in either of my plaques is a number 4 or a number 9 but 2 different times there is a 52 together. I guess the seller and I both incorrectly assumed that the 52 in the body number and the serial number had some relavance. I prefer it being correctly registered, but in reality it does not make a big difference to me since it is just going to be a ratty old shop/ranch truck with a simple 60s styled hot rod flare to it. The registration is just semantic to me, but I will see if I can get it changed just to be correct.

      I really appreciate the help Dwain and Skip.

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      • #4
        Studebaker did not put model year numbers in their truck models, but used letters, like S, T, J, K, L, M, R, and E. The model year changeover was just an arbitrarily established date provided to dealers and DMVs by official corporate letters.
        Skip Lackie

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        • #5
          I've often wondered just what were the criteria that dictated instituting a new series designation so far as trucks are concerned. Why - if there were S, T, J, K, M AND E - was there never a simple R series??? Started out with 2R, then 3R, then jump to E, then 2E and so forth. And let's be honest here - WHAT sets the 3E trucks apart (enough) from the 4E??? It's not like they sported new engines, or frames or brakes, or even sheet metal! But SOMEONE at Studebaker had to make the decision for a new series designator. The early Champs are another case like this 5E, 6E, 7E, It's like their persistence in using a capital I for the numeral One. It just doesn't compute.



          j
          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Roscomacaw View Post
            I've often wondered just what were the criteria that dictated instituting a new series designation so far as trucks are concerned. Why - if there were S, T, J, K, M AND E - was there never a simple R series??? Started out with 2R, then 3R, then jump to E, then 2E and so forth. And let's be honest here - WHAT sets the 3E trucks apart (enough) from the 4E??? It's not like they sported new engines, or frames or brakes, or even sheet metal! But SOMEONE at Studebaker had to make the decision for a new series designator. The early Champs are another case like this 5E, 6E, 7E, It's like their persistence in using a capital I for the numeral One. It just doesn't compute.




            j
            I can only provide a specific response to your question about a "simple R series" truck. In his history of the 2R trucks in TW, Fred Fox briefly discusses the still-born R-series truck. I don't have the article handy, but my recollection is that it was to have a torsion-bar suspension and other features that were later deemed to be too expensive. The article had a picture that showed it had a fadeaway front fender line that extended into the door, sorta like the 46-48 Buicks. The alternate design, already designated as 2R, was chosen for production.

            But I agree with your general comment about the general weirdness of some of their practices, like using the I instead of a 1. Most companies used letters to designate models, at least in-house. But why would they designate the truck cabs as C, when they were already using that letter for a car body (or maybe it was the other way around)? It's not like they had already used up all the letters in the alphabet.
            Skip Lackie

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            • #7
              Someone commented once that the C in C-cab refered more to the shape of the cab. The really rounded roof line and down under the doors look a bit like a C.

              I can not speak to the validity of this concept. It was just a person I talked to who thought he remembered this from back in the day.

              I would really like it to be registered as the '49 it is, but I have already filled out the paper work as a '52. I guess the PO used to engine number to ID it, that and the fact that both the body number and the serial number have a 52 in it does make it simpler {is that a word} and may just seem more legit to the DMV.

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              • #8
                Would be glad to copy a couple of original Stude docs and mail them to you to prove to the DMV that your truck is a 49 if that's the way you want to go. Your truck, your decision.
                Skip Lackie

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                • #9
                  Kelly, that "commentors" notion about the origin of C-cab might be worth considering if one could offer up a reason that the Champ trucks were and are referred to as T-cabs. As Skip and I have observed (along with many other knowledgable sorts), Stude did some things with designations that defy logic. NO DOUBT - there WAS some reason for doing what they did in this realm, but since no one really mused about such until well after the company was history, we'll likely never know what those reasons were. And actually, it's kinda cool that there's STILL some mystery to it all.
                  No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kmac530 View Post
                    Someone commented once that the C in C-cab refered more to the shape of the cab. The really rounded roof line and down under the doors look a bit like a C.

                    I can not speak to the validity of this concept. It was just a person I talked to who thought he remembered this from back in the day.

                    .
                    Good story, but of dubious validity. The 1941-48 M-series truck cabs were also designated as C-cabs, though the term wasn't used much then. The original M-series truck cab was designated as C2, IAW standard Stude practice of an alphanumeric indicating both body design and trim level. A lower number meant a lowel level of elegance (probably not the most accurate term, but you get the idea). As WWII came to a close in 1945, Stude received authority from the government to produce exactly 4000 1945-model M15 1-ton trucks. To save time, these were fitted with the cab that was currently being installed on the US6 6x6 trucks being built for the Army. This cab design was designated as the C9, and can be easily identified by its swing-out windshield.

                    The term C-cab didn't come into much use until 1960, when Stude had to distinguish between the Transtars with their 1949-design C cab and the new Champs, which were designated as T-cabs.
                    Skip Lackie

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                    • #11
                      I was not sure if there was any accuracy to the look of the cab being why it was called a C-cab....looks like it could have been true. And it you put a Champ on its roof it looks like a T.....lol

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                      • #12
                        The term C-cab didn't come into much use until 1960, when Stude had to distinguish between the Transtars with their 1949-design C cab and the new Champs, which were designated as T-cabs.
                        A bit of irony there, eh? The Transtars should have gotten the "T" designation - while the Champs got the "C" designation. Something else to smile at!
                        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As stated there was an R series truck. This was the way that Bob Bourke designed the truck. It went as far as a prototype (at least one running truck). Manufacturing said that the factory couldn't build it as designed. That is why the body was changed to what became the 2R. This also resulted in the kickout at the bottom of the door to hide some of the internal "running boards".

                          The Transtars were C cabs, so someone at Studebaker with a sense of humor decided that the Champs should be T cabs.

                          Many years ago, I had both of these supported by people that were there.
                          Gary L.
                          Wappinger, NY

                          SDC member since 1968
                          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                          • #14
                            Now that is funny.

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