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Mr Biggs' "Woody Cruiser"

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  • Warren Webb
    replied
    Biggs, you have a strong case of "Advanced thinking" for sure!! I love it. Chuckled to myself seeing the use of the 66 grille! Keep em coming!

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    More details

    Here's a few more pix. Three shots of the sub-structure and a shot of a trial fitting of a '66 nose. I'd like to use the '61 Front panel, but it's shape doesn't lend itself to fitting up as well.
    Attached Files

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  • snowy_buffalo
    replied
    Originally posted by Studedude View Post
    HORSE FEATHERS!

    You have a lot to offer, and ya know it!

    Great to see a follow up on your project, Bob.

    Even more so, it's great to see the update HERE!

    Thanks for jumping in, and please, stay with us!

    Ditto what Dave said Bob........Please stay with us !! I miss your stories you pen occasionally and also hearing about Pete.

    Leave a comment:


  • Studedude
    replied
    Biggs here. I still read this one forum. One important thing I've learned is the realization of how little I have to offer the Stude community. So a presence of mere observation is the best for me.
    HORSE FEATHERS!

    You have a lot to offer, and ya know it!

    Great to see a follow up on your project, Bob.

    Even more so, it's great to see the update HERE!

    Thanks for jumping in, and please, stay with us!

    Leave a comment:


  • Orestudeguy
    replied
    Bob,
    My son delivered the rear trunk half to the guy who needed it, and brought back a frame for the Lark that he got from John & Tracy Smith (Karl).
    The guy was really happy to get it. And my son was happy to get the frame.
    Another project that we will soon get going on.
    Take care and good to hear from you!

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeMann
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Bryant View Post
    Whenever I look at forum messages from a few years back it reminds me that quite a few contributors are no longer participating. Maybe some of them have become more involved in other forums. We all have missed Mr. Biggs.
    Amen to that!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Bryant
    replied
    Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
    Many have not left; just sitting back to give others a chance.
    Whenever I look at forum messages from a few years back it reminds me that quite a few contributors are no longer participating. Maybe some of them have become more involved in other forums. We all have missed Mr. Biggs.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Yes George, the same Cruiser I was demonized for parting out when I posted those videos. The same Cruiser your son took the trunk section off of to save another Lark. The same Cruiser that's donating some doors to another Lark this week. The same Cruiser that's providing drive train components to put another Stude back in action eventually. The same Cruiser that's donated it's rear window to put another Cruiser bqack in action. And now it's bare frame serves too. Fresh engine, new brakes, new tires, new dual exhaust system and the seller couldn't get a few hundred bucks for it because it looked poopey. What's a fresh 289 worth? I think I got a deal.
    Surely this bench will outlast me. I wonder if it's next owner will use it, scrap it, have any idea that it's built on a Studebaker frame, or care.

    Leave a comment:


  • 53hardtop
    replied
    Originally posted by Orestudeguy View Post
    ....Now we need Dick Steinkamp back!!....
    That would make it like the good old days!

    Leave a comment:


  • Orestudeguy
    replied
    Hey Bob,
    Was this the Lark that you had a video some time back. driving around your neighborhood?
    Interesting transformation. I like it!!
    And it's good to see your post on here.
    Now we need Dick Steinkamp back!!

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by 53hardtop View Post
    Looks like it could have been a LARK to me... it's just missing a few parts now.
    Since the Cruiser was a 1961, it was a LARK.

    Welcome back, Bob K.!

    Leave a comment:


  • 53hardtop
    replied
    Originally posted by Roscomacaw View Post
    ......That said, I guess it could be concluded it wasn't just something I did on a lark.....
    Looks like it could have been a LARK to me... it's just missing a few parts now.

    Leave a comment:


  • BobPalma
    replied
    Bob, I'm afraid you might have lost half the audience with reference to a "necker knob." <GGG> BP

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Biggs here. I still read this one forum. One important thing I've learned is the realization of how little I have to offer the Stude community. So a presence of mere observation is the best for me.

    Thanks Paul, for posting the photos of my moblie workbench - my Woody Cruiser. With generally seven straight months of warm, dry weather (and no mosquitos), I've gotten to where I prefer to work outdoors when I can. I had a 4 foot by 8 foot workbench that I loved using in the back yard, but was a pain in the rear to move for mowing or other facilitations. I mused about adding wheels and then had the idea of using one of several rolling chassis I had sitting about.
    Like the chassis, some of the structural wood I used is stuff I've scavenged in years past. There's some honest to gosh two by fours from a 1920s house that was torn down as well as some four by fours that were once packing for shipments of aluminum ingots. I wanted a truly BEEFY bench that I could throw anything on or flail with a hammer if I had need to, so I used lots of 4X4 and 2X10 lumber. The biggest challenge was establishing a level worksurface on a frame that's anything but straight. So nice to have the modern convenience of a laser to work with!

    I do intend for this modified Stude to be self-motivating, albeit at a walking pace. I've left the area just forward of the rear axle empty in anticipation of a powerplant of some sort. Ideally I'd like to find the guts of an electric golf cart. T'would be cool to build a modern-day battery-powered (solar recharged!), wooden Studebaker what with the vintage electric truck that's currently being restored. For now tho, I can push this thing without too much strain, AND I added a tongue to tow it with if I wanna use the riding lawn mower.
    I've built in an air compressor and have hose connections on all four corners as well as six 110V outlets for electric tools. My only oversight was the weight of the table saw and it's platform at the rear. The Cruiser's rear springs weren't up to the task. But - air shocks took care of that. And since it's not gonna be doing any road driving, I figure that the air shocks are a fair "fix".

    Since I only envision this thing crawling along, brakes and a driving seat aren't something that's necessary. I probably won't bother with flanged axles either. Since I DID want to maintain the steering function (without it being too complicated), I have the steering box held to the frame rail with only one bolt. This allowed me to lay the sector back to where the steering shaft stuck straight towards the rear. I cut the top six inches of the shaft off and welded on an extension of 3/4" tubing. Then I welded the six inch stubb to that so it sticks out just past the rearmost crossmember. I can slap the steering wheel on the serrated stub so I can steer while pushing (and ultimately while motor-vating), and remove it while working on and around the bench. My hot-rodder neighbor contributed a necker knob to make steering easier while pushing.

    I've already used the bench to build some things, but I'm still adding features like drawers to store hardware and cabinets for tools and such. I want it to be as weather-worthy as possible and have built it with that aim in mind all along. I'm toying with the idea of making some of the side cabinet doors so as to emulate the "Woody" side panels on woodies of yore. Function has precedence over appearances tho, so I may not be that ambitious. I'm no master craftsman by anyone's yardstick. Cosequently, like a Studebaker, the fit and finish make this thing about a "20-footer". 40-footer if you're eyesight's better'n mine. But function and utilization was my primary goal and so far it's looks like I've gotten that. It actually took me about a year to convince myself I could do something like this. That said, I guess it could be concluded it wasn't just something I did on a lark.

    OK. That's it for now. I'm building a storage cabinet for the wife. Over 'n out.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michidan
    replied
    That's a pretty fancy rain cover for that nice CA frame.

    Leave a comment:

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