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You will love "CRITICALPAST if you haven't seen it

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  • You will love "CRITICALPAST if you haven't seen it

    Thousands of old film clips from the past 100+ years. Two in particular are a must see:

    http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65...r-model-parked

    http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65...otor-car-skids

    I have the original 16mm of the 1932 crash scenes but I never saw the one with Big '31 roadster.

    Many to browse. Enjoy. I did!
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  • #2
    In the chash scene. Is the top on the first car a full steel one ?
    Klif
    55 Speedster/Street Machine
    63 Avanti R2
    64 Convertible R1

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks RQ.
      I have the sound turned off on my computer because everyone else in the house is asleep. But that vid of the 31 Roadster was so funny I nearly busted a gut trying to keep from laughing out loud and wakening the family. It looked like a bunch of little munchkins that had just stolen someone's new car.
      Jerry Forrester
      Forrester's Chrome
      Douglasville, Georgia

      See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

      Comment


      • #4
        I almost cried when I watched this vid. I did get teary eyed.
        http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65..._blast-furnace
        Man, what a waste. Is that a Stude emblem on that radiator shell?
        Jerry Forrester
        Forrester's Chrome
        Douglasville, Georgia

        See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jerry Forrester View Post
          I almost cried when I watched this vid. I did get teary eyed.
          http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65..._blast-furnace
          Man, what a waste. Is that a Stude emblem on that radiator shell?
          Makes me sad too.

          As I watched I thought that probably not one thing you can see in that footage- human, equipment, building- exists today. It reminds me that nothing is forever.
          Proud NON-CASO

          I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

          If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

          GOD BLESS AMERICA

          Ephesians 6:10-17
          Romans 15:13
          Deuteronomy 31:6
          Proverbs 28:1

          Illegitimi non carborundum

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          • #6
            Dick: The first clip you linked, of the Giant Car, is dated March 2, 1931....yet there are some streaks on the door that make it appear old, as if it had been there several years.

            When was the Giant Car actually built? Wasn't it virtually new on March 2, 1931? BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
              Dick: The first clip you linked, of the Giant Car, is dated March 2, 1931....yet there are some streaks on the door that make it appear old, as if it had been there several years.
              When was the Giant Car actually built? Wasn't it virtually new on March 2, 1931? BP
              I saw that and thought.... They painted it the day before and it rained or there was a heavy dew that night.
              Jerry Forrester
              Forrester's Chrome
              Douglasville, Georgia

              See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                Dick: The first clip you linked, of the Giant Car, is dated March 2, 1931....yet there are some streaks on the door that make it appear old, as if it had been there several years.

                When was the Giant Car actually built? Wasn't it virtually new on March 2, 1931? BP
                The President and Commander series cars that are universally referred to as '31 models today were actually introduced in July 1930 (production began in June). All production model 80 President 4-season roadsters had dual side mounts. The big wooden car did not. I believe the big Proving Ground car was constructed in the spring of '30 before they finalized their decision on this detail. Therefore it could have been a year old when this film was shot. Incidentally it was built to act as a prop for a film called "Wild Flowers." A copy of this 12 minute short was only recently discovered and is now in the possession of the Library of Congress. They are preserving it and it will be made available to the public once finished. I have a copy.
                Richard Quinn
                Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jerry Forrester View Post
                  I almost cried when I watched this vid. I did get teary eyed.
                  http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65..._blast-furnace
                  Man, what a waste. Is that a Stude emblem on that radiator shell?
                  I have the original 16mm of this clip plus several still photos. It was shot at the Studebaker Proving Ground. This was taken before Studebaker began using the full steel top (1936).
                  Richard Quinn
                  Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Cool, Dick; thanks.

                    Several screenings of Wild Flowers will be scheduled in The Studebaker National Museum theater during the 2012 International Meet; right? Or, at 12 minutes, even a continuous loop. BP
                    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                    Ayn Rand:
                    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
                      I have the original 16mm of this clip plus several still photos. It was shot at the Studebaker Proving Ground. This was taken before Studebaker began using the full steel top (1936).
                      Dick: Are you, Jerry Forrester, and Bob Andrews on the same page? It appears Jerry and Bob are referencing the four-car load of "junkers" being dismantled and crushed at the Ford plant, whereas your response suggests the large car being rolled down the hill at The Studebaker Proving Ground. BP

                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                        Cool, Dick; thanks.

                        Several screenings of Wild Flowers will be scheduled in The Studebaker National Museum theater during the 2012 International Meet; right? Or, at 12 minutes, even a continuous loop. BP
                        I showed the video in the ASC hospitality room at the meet in Springfield last June. Will have it in South Bend.
                        Richard Quinn
                        Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                          Dick: Are you, Jerry Forrester, and Bob Andrews on the same page? It appears Jerry and Bob are referencing the four-car load of "junkers" being dismantled and crushed at the Ford plant, whereas your response suggests the large car being rolled down the hill at The Studebaker Proving Ground. BP

                          Thanks Bob. They were on the same page, I wasn't. Yes one of those cars prominently shown in the dismantling video was an early '20s Studebaker Big Six.
                          Richard Quinn
                          Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Interesting, the video that includes rolling the car down the hill, uprighting it, and then starting it and driving it away under its own power without having to do any repairs following the multi-roll tumble.

                            http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65...otor-car-skids

                            Of course, that couldn't happen today because the electric fuel pump safety would have been tripped during the rollover, disabling the fuel pump's electric circuit and rendering the car "inop" until reset.

                            Do you suppose the guys at the top of the hill, the fellas that set it tumbling down, could imagine the day would come when one of them would have to yell to one of the guys at the bottom, "Hey, Walter; don't forget to open the trunk and reset the fuel pump safety switch before you guys try to start it!" <GGG> BP
                            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                            Ayn Rand:
                            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Is that the same Walter to whom Ethelbert ("Casey, Crime Photographer") always yelled, "Hey, Walter, bring up some more lemons"?

                              John

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