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  • Cutting Coils

    Okay, lets hear what you Hawk guys have done to bring the front of your Hawk down for the "Perfect" Look???
    I want to cut a coil, "but how much"???
    The coild in my wifes 61 Hawk are 9/16" wire and twice as long as the 5/8" coils that had been cut way too much in my56 Hawk.....it looked great but there was no motor in it.
    It would have fallen on its face when a motor & trans was added.
    Please give me your thoughts!
    Good Roads
    Brian
    Brian Woods
    woodysrods@shaw.ca
    1946 M Series (Shop Truck)

  • #2
    Brian,
    The car below has 2 coils cut out of Std V8 springs. The car is Stude powered V8 with a 4 speed, no AC, no PS, no SC, for weight comparison. I have since cut another coil out of them to drop it just slightly lower. Its funny that the more coils you cut do not lower the car proportionally. The first coil gives the greatest drop. The second only slightly lower and the third barely lower than the second. The torsional rigidity of the spring increases with fewer coils, so you don't get as much drop with each coil cut. Dig?
    Last edited by sals54; 09-28-2011, 01:21 AM.
    sals54

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    • #3
      I'm trying to decide on lowering the spring pocket on my 64 Lark instead of cutting coils, (which could mean a longer shock) My Lark has always sit too High in front, If i cut coils i was thinking of adding smaller wire springs (Like the 6cyl) then cutting coils which would stiffen up after cutting a couple of coils out.
      101st Airborne Div. 326 Engineers Ft Campbell Ky.

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      • #4
        we cut one coil off and got 2" of drop and then it settled down another inch.



        with the 6 cyl springs its a bit soft so over the winter we are gonna try a set of s10 coils cut to the same amount of drop. I've cut a lot of coils and to be honest you wont notice any stiffening, in fact theres been a couple cars that were softer after cutting the coils.
        http://datinmanspeaks.blogspot.com/

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        • #5
          Thanks Jay
          That has always been my experience. One coil give you about a 2 inch drop and the car settles about 1" to 1 1/2" after the first 500 miles.
          Brian Woods
          woodysrods@shaw.ca
          1946 M Series (Shop Truck)

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          • #6
            That looks excellent Tinman, does it rub anywhere when turning?
            101st Airborne Div. 326 Engineers Ft Campbell Ky.

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            • #7
              Thanks for posting this thread. I was curious about this as my new wagon will need to be lowered. I've already got new A-arm bushings.. Only a couple minutes extra work to cut the springs.

              What's the most common way to lower the back end to match, as I want mine low, but level. Lowering blocks?

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              • #8
                heres the funny part, with those wheels and tires yes, but with the bigger bias plys it doesnt.



                The bias ply are narrower toward the tread so they dont rub. With the radials it would rub only when you had it cranked hard.

                I do need to shorten or reposition the bumpstops because it does bottom out fairly easily. Stiffer springs and some reengineering will fix it though.

                For the back we used some 2" lowering blocks, when you load the trunk full of goodies and spare parts/tools it sit pretty good. When you load the trunk and put 5 adults in it, it looks REAL good haha!
                http://datinmanspeaks.blogspot.com/

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                • #9
                  The set up on this car below, uses '68 Caddilac Fleetwood coils up front with 2 to 3 coils cut off of the bottom. It took two disassembly/assembly trial fits to acheive a "level" (right to left) ride height. It also has dual front sway bars. The early model V8 bar that clamps only to the lower control arms, cut 4" off of each end, and welded the last 4" of it to the bottom side of the original bar. Remember, the late model bar has a stand-off from the frame, then attaches at the outer end of the lower control arm. Urethane bar bushings and Delrin upper & lower control arm bushings. Gabriel shocks set on extra firm at all 4 corners. Rear springs have 2 extra leaves in each and a rear sway bar from a 57-58 President sedan. Stiff.....yes, it has to be. Cornering....oh yea, sticks like glue. Wheels, 8X15" front and rear. Tires 225/70HR15 front and rear. "Rolled" fender lips front and rear, have never had any tire contact. FYI, The only new parts bought were the bushings and shocks, all other was used. Typical CASO, but, all it has to do is work. For more pictures, go to "member's pictures" about half way down page 4. As the saying goes, "A picture(s) is worth a thousand words."

                  Dan Miller
                  Auburn, GA

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                  • #10
                    Dan, one of these days I want to go for a ride in that car.

                    That leisurely cruise around the block doesn't count.

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                    • #11
                      Matthew,
                      The only tracks I've been to, won't let you run "hammer-down" with a passenger. They've got spotters all around the track....if you're caught "trying", they very politely tell you to pack your **** and leave....do not pass go, do not...You know the drill. They do have a "touring" time you can drive on the track, but there is a pace car that limits your speed to around 70 max on the straight aways. Sorry bout' that.

                      Dan Miller
                      Auburn, GA

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                      • #12
                        Coil wire size on the coils #1547376 *J9 from 61 Hawk with 289 V8 have a .60 wire size. My 56 has a wire size of .64.
                        Thinking of cutting 1 1/2 coils????
                        Any more testimonials?
                        Good Roads
                        Brian
                        Brian Woods
                        woodysrods@shaw.ca
                        1946 M Series (Shop Truck)

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