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Stirring the Pot for Studebaker at age 17

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  • Stirring the Pot for Studebaker at age 17

    The more things change, the more they stay the same.

    To wit: Much has been said about the ongoing, never-to-be-settled, question of "buying domestic."

    While looking for something else today, I ran across this Letter to the Editor that was published in the long-since defunct evening Indianapolis News just before Christmas 1963. I penned it and sent it in as a 17-year-old:


    5359 Mark Lane
    Indianapolis 26, Indiana
    December 19, 1963

    The Indianapolis News
    Office of The Editor
    Indianapolis, Indiana

    Dear Sir,

    As a firm Studebaker advocate, I have been carefully watching the current events concerning Studebaker's shift of Automotive Division production to Hamilton, Ontario, and am indeed sorry for all the Studebaker workers who will no longer be building the only automobile that was Indiana-built in recent years.

    However, I must question the concern expressed by our state officials over their new problem of the unemployment of some 4,500+ workers. Are these not the same men whose contemporaries in our state government often "signed on the dotted line" for the state of Indiana, contracting for several score or hundred non-Studebaker cars or trucks, thus taking the state's transportation needs outside the state to be fulfilled? It is doubtful that many of these now problem-laden men personally drive Studebakers.

    Certainly, they must be concerned about this unemployment problem as part of the duties of their positions, but it seems to be rather nearsighted on the part of their fellow workers to have agreed to use non-Indiana-built vehicles just a short time ago and, obviously, increase the load on their fellow man.

    Yours truly,

    Bob Palma


    The above letter I remember introducing me to the world of Government BS at the tender age of 17. That's because when they printed the letter in the paper, they asked someone in the state motor pool for a response. They printed his remarks after my letter, in which the spokesman said, "there were some cars and trucks for which Studebaker didn't build a vehicle of those specifications."

    I remember thinking at the time, "Boy, what a crock; they could easily change a few specifications to use Studebakers, or Studebaker would build to their specs if given a chance." Thus my formal introduction to authentic bureaucratic BS!

    Indeed: The more things change, the more they stay the same...although I think it is getting a little deeper out here! <GGG> BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    I'm not in Govt. but I guess I'll keep driving my Mexican Dodge...
    Neil Thornton

    Comment


    • #3
      How "domestic" do you want it to be? Your letter seems to only cover automobile manufacturing within the state of Indiana, though it was commendable to publicly show concern for the workers in your home state.

      Craig

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
        How "domestic" do you want it to be? Your letter seems to only cover automobile manufacturing within the state of Indiana, though it was commendable to publicly show concern for the workers in your home state. Craig
        Actually, Craig: In retrospect, that letter reflects my how naive I was at the time.

        In reality, General Motors -and probably Ford, and maybe even Chrysler- employed more people in Indiana in 1963 than did Studebaker. GM for sure; I'm not sure about the others.

        But at age 17, you tend to equate point of final assembly with where something is built.

        'Big difference between then and now, though, in terms of domestic tranquility. Even if the state bought vehicles from GM, the profit from those vehicles would remain in the United States, unlike today's realities that generate much angst, as we've noted! <GGG> BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          As we all know Bob, History is doomed to repeat itself........

          I only wish at 17 I had paid as much attention to the world, but alas......... girls in mini skirts had my attention!
          sigpicIt is an addiction!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jbwhttail View Post
            As we all know Bob, History is doomed to repeat itself........

            I only wish at 17 I had paid as much attention to the world, but alas......... girls in mini skirts had my attention!
            Honest, Joe; if you think for a moment I'm gonna touch that....<GGG> BP

            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Although people don't remember it much now, there was a lot of state "patriotism" in choosing major products, and chambers of commerce were all over that. In some fields, one county was favored over another. Frontier days, mythical past, etc. Naive maybe, but except for when it got nasty -- and it could! -- I used to think it was kind of touching. We just don't like each other that much anymore.

              Comment

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