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What's this heap worth?

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  • What's this heap worth?

    I may be purchasing a 1947 Studebaker Champion Business Coupe.

    Here's the classified ad: http://atlanta.craigslist.org/eat/cto/2553659377.html

    I've put a few more pictures here: https://picasaweb.google.com/1070985...898/Studebaker

    The seller is asking $550. I'd like some opinions before I commit to it for sure.

    Is it worth the asking price? It appears to be mostly complete, except the front bumper is missing.

    --buddy

  • #2
    hard to tell by your pictures how much rust damage you have. to me that would be the deal breaker. that is a smoking deal for any business coupe that is restorable.

    Originally posted by nullset View Post
    I may be purchasing a 1947 Studebaker Champion Business Coupe.

    Here's the classified ad: http://atlanta.craigslist.org/eat/cto/2553659377.html

    I've put a few more pictures here: https://picasaweb.google.com/1070985...898/Studebaker

    The seller is asking $550. I'd like some opinions before I commit to it for sure.

    Is it worth the asking price? It appears to be mostly complete, except the front bumper is missing.

    --buddy

    Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
    53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
    57 SH (project)
    60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

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    • #3
      It's…..quite a bit of rust. The plan is to run it in 24 hours of lemons (I hope that doesn't offend anyone here….). I have a metal worker that can handle the rust. We're more worried about the brakes.

      As of right now, we'll be picking it up and hauling it to our shop soon. The plan is to run it in a '24 hours of lemons' race some time next year. I know it's a shame, but it certainly qualifies. After that, I'm not sure what we'll do with it.

      The trunk on this thing is…strangely large. I can't imagine what that was intended for. From what I've heard, these inline 6's are extremely solid and difficult to mess up.

      --buddy

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      • #4
        The car looks fairly complete. However, I did not see any pics of the engine. If it has the engine and an overdrive transmission you might have something to work with. They can be restored or made into a pretty neat rod. I did an off frame complete restoration on the one in my signature pic. It only took me six years.

        As for value...I would get the weight of the car, find out what scrap yards are paying for a car of that weight...offer a few cents more per pound and see if the owner will take it. If you have the ability to do most of the restoration yourself, it might be a reasonable project. If you have to pay for others to do the work for you, plan to own and enjoy it for a long time.

        Whatever you do...good luck, and hope you join us in the Studebaker family!
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

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        • #5
          The engine is there. The hood hinges are frozen up, so we weren't able to get much of a look at it. The only thing missing is the front bumper, as far as I can tell. I know it has a manual transmission. I'm not sure about overdrive.

          For those who aren't familiar, 24 hours of lemons is a 24 hour endurance race, for cars that cost $500 or less, excluding safety equipment (fuel lines, brakes, tires, wheels, roll cage, racing harness). There are some spare parts in the car, like 2 carburetors and some body parts, that we can sell off to get it under budget. We do have a skilled metal worker on the team, who has offered to make any necessary repairs.

          --buddy

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          • #6
            Looks like it was a show-winner at some point judging from the trophy in the trunk.
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nullset View Post

              For those who aren't familiar, 24 hours of lemons is a 24 hour endurance race, for cars that cost $500 or less, excluding safety equipment (fuel lines, brakes, tires, wheels, roll cage, racing harness).

              --buddy
              In that case, why not leave this historic restorable example of the first new modern post war era production car design to someone who could appreciate it for its significance.

              You could buy a later model running ordinary GM product for under $500.00, spend less money, and by choosing a GM product, be more likely to have a true lemon!
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jclary View Post
                In that case, why not leave this historic restorable example of the first new modern post war era production car design to someone who could appreciate it for its significance.

                You could buy a later model running ordinary GM product for under $500.00, spend less money, and by choosing a GM product, be more likely to have a true lemon!
                Quite honestly, the reason is that this one is interesting. If we don't buy it, it's most likely headed to the crusher. At least this way, it'll see some use. It's been sitting for 30 years. I hate to see any car rust away into nothing.

                Besides, the whole point of lemons is to race a car that clearly doesn't belong on a race track. We will not be doing anything that would destroy the car. We even plan on racing with the stock engine and transmission.

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                • #9
                  This car has been on Craigslist for a pretty long time. I say go for it. Get some use out of a car that will likely otherwise be scrapped. I don't see a line of restorers racing to save it.

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                  • #10
                    The trunk on this thing is…strangely large. I can't imagine what that was intended for.
                    This is a fairly rare body style, called a "salesman's coupe". It was designed for traveling salesmen, and the huge trunk was to carry samples in. More than a car, and less than a pickup truck.

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                    • #11
                      If it is headed to the crusher, I would just offer slightly more, like $25 more, than what it would bring in scrap. When you are finished with the car, you can sell it whole or parts of it (probably worth more in parts if you want to bother).
                      Gary L.
                      Wappinger, NY

                      SDC member since 1968
                      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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                      • #12
                        Around here scrap is going for $350 a long ton. That car is worth $500 scrap.

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                        • #13
                          Now that I have a better understanding of the competition and event, I say GO FOR IT! However, it might be good to enlist some of your local Studebaker Club members to assist in preparing and pitting the car. For example, not everybody is knowledgeable of the "Planar" independent suspension with its transverse mounted leaf spring. Each one of those grease fittings are there for a purpose. Then there is that tapered axle rear end with the outer bearing that must be lubricated by removing a tiny 1/8" pipe plug, installing a temporary grease fitting and giving it a couple of shots of grease. On the brakes...each shoe must be adjusted individually (often a race is won by out braking the competition as important as outrunning him) and if it is equipped with a hill-holder, it probably should be disabled or removed for competition.

                          All this and we have not begun to address the engine. Those little flat head six Stude's are tough as nails but there are some tricks and systems that need attention. The water jackets need to be cleaned and flushed completely, radiator cleaned and clear, etc.


                          Sure would be terrific to see the old coupe resurrected to roar (or rumble) back to life to compete in such a fun event.
                          John Clary
                          Greer, SC

                          SDC member since 1975

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                          • #14
                            Awesome. We are going to be purchasing it tomorrow, and having it dragged down to our workshop on Saturday.

                            It'll be in Atlanta, Ga. Anyone that would like to come check it out is more than welcome. We are definitely in over our heads, but we're looking forward to the process.

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                            • #15
                              Not that it matters a lot, but the grille, grille extensions, rear bumper, and dashboard elements all say this car is actually a '49.

                              Regarding the stuck hood hinges: Are you aware these cars had a remote hood release, just like modern cars? I can't see it in your pics, but look for a knob to the left of the steering wheel with an "H" on it. It may be broken off. Also, the cables often freeze up. This can be bypassed by lying on your back, looking up under behind the grille, there is a slot to put a screwdriver or lever in to push the hood release manually. Hope this helps.

                              Going racing? Hope not. I would worry about the integrity of the frame (rust) and body (rust). Also, even completely renewed brakes on these cars ($500+) results in mediocre brakes. Not for racing.

                              P.S. My money-less racing friend just competed in Chump Car Racing at Beaver Run, Pa. for the first time. Ran a Pontiac Fiero 2M4. Their "Chariot of Fire" caught fire on the last lap.
                              Last edited by kurtruk; 09-20-2011, 07:13 PM.
                              KURTRUK
                              (read it backwards)




                              Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

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