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  • Split rims?

    Hey Gents and ladies,
    First thing I need to do with my NTM '52 Stude 3/4 ton is to get it rolling in case I need to move it around. The wheels rotate okay so that is a start, but my issue is flat tires preventing the rolling.

    I have 7.00x16 tires on the truck, 3 will hold air for a bit maybe longer for some, but 1 is just rotted and gone. I have a few useable 16" tires off of my last 2500HD truck that may fit the rims but I am not sure.

    They are 16" on the truck and 16" from my work truck, but my issue is that the Stude rims are 2 piece. I have done split ring rims before but it has been a while. The wierd part is I dont see any split in these rings. There are rings that look separate from the main rim, 2 piece, but that outer ring has NO split in it.

    Is this ring removed by it flexing over the rim like a tire does? OR am I missing something?

    And YES, I am POSITIVE the outer ring is NOT split anywhere that I can find. I have used a wire brush and scubbed the ring and edge of the rim thinking maybe it was just covered in paint, but NOPE. 1 piece ring.

    My feeling is that there may be 3rd component to the wheel. Maybe a round split ring like a snap ring that when you push the solid outer ring back then you pull out a snap ring that retains the outer solid ring?????

    Any ideas folks?

  • #2
    Welcome aboard. Get a Studebaker Truck Shop Manual and it will have photos and directions for just this sort of question.

    Yes, some 16" tires will fit, but most later tires are really too wide for the Stude rims. I wouldn't mount anything more than 235. The perfect size is 215/85-16. Michelins are best.

    No, the rings aren't split. Yes, the rings are one-piece. Hint, Look for two flat places on the inner rim where the ring seats.

    jack vines.
    Last edited by PackardV8; 09-18-2011, 08:34 PM.
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      I knew someone would know...flat spots on the rim...good to know. I need a manual, I know that. Just looking to be able to move it until I get one. I gotta sell some bike stuff before I can spend money on my truck...

      So with this flat spot design, 1 piece ring non-split rim, it seem that would be somewhat safer to work on that the old split ring style that explode apart if not seated properly.
      Last edited by kmac530; 09-18-2011, 09:14 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by kmac530 View Post
        I knew someone would know...flat spots on the rim...good to know. I need a manual, I know that. Just looking to be able to move it until I get one. I gotta sell some bike stuff before I can spend money on my truck...

        So with this flat spot design, 1 piece ring non-split rim, it seem that would be somewhat safer to work on that the old split ring style that explode apart if not seated properly.

        All of these rims are dangerous by todays standards. Please add a few pics so we can see exactly which style wheel you are dealing with. Steve
        sigpic

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        • #5
          Per the Shop Manual:
          "Insert the straight end of the rim tool in the notch. Keep the opposite side of the ring in the gutter groove and pry the ring out and upward with the rim tool. Continue around with the rim tool and tire iron and remove the side ring."



          All of these rims are dangerous by todays standards.
          Is there documentation of a Studebaker Budd-style two-piece wheel with solid ring in good condition has failed in normal use? I've worked on them for fifty years and never seen any failures. As with any 50-60 year-old parts, inspect for damage or excessive rust. If in doubt have a professional inspect it for you.

          jack vines
          Last edited by PackardV8; 09-19-2011, 12:43 AM.
          PackardV8

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          • #6
            That is kind of the issue, finding a proffesional. Even the big truck tire companies in this area wont work on 2 piece wheels anymore. Even companies like Pete's say they wont touch them.

            I will get it with that manual quote from Packard v8. Thanx once again guys. This is gonna be a great new site to help aide me in this project. Very appreciated.

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            • #7
              Is there documentation of a Studebaker Budd-style two-piece wheel with solid ring in good condition has failed in normal use? I've worked on them for fifty years and never seen any failures. As with any 50-60 year-old parts, inspect for damage or excessive rust. If in doubt have a professional inspect it for you.

              jack vines[/QUOTE]


              I have never heard of one failing in use though I have seen wheel rings broken/lost in accidents with other makes and have seen them do extensive damage. The dangers I am very aware of are in seating the bead when you first air the tire up. I had changed several sets of 2 piece wheels with the split outer ring but had never dealt with three piece wheels before the 49 2R-15 I am working on now. I do see a HUGE potential for danger when those are reseated. Steve
              Last edited by wolfie; 09-19-2011, 04:49 PM.
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kmac530 View Post
                That is kind of the issue, finding a proffesional. Even the big truck tire companies in this area wont work on 2 piece wheels anymore. Even companies like Pete's say they wont touch them.

                I will get it with that manual quote from Packard v8. Thanx once again guys. This is gonna be a great new site to help aide me in this project. Very appreciated.

                Try a few forklift repair shops. The guy who is working on my wheels said they are similar to some older forklift wheels. Steve
                sigpic

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                • #9
                  I have never heard of one failing in use though I have seen wheel rings broken/lost in accidents with other makes and have seen them do extensive damage. The dangers I am very aware of are in seating the bead when you first air the tire up. I had changed several sets of 2 piece wheels with the split outer ring but had never dealt with three piece wheels before the 49 2R-15 I am working on now. I do see a HUGE potential for danger when those are reseated. Steve
                  Just so we're clear, for the third time, we aren't discussing split ring wheels or three-piece wheels. The OP clearly stated in his first post his truck is a 3/4t with the solid ring. These aren't big truck rims and don't have the potential problems mentioned above.

                  jack vines
                  PackardV8

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                  • #10
                    Try an old-line tire shop. One with lots of old cars around it and many years of old tires, rims, parts etc.stacked inside. It helps if the place is run by a grizzled old guy, and no clean-cut youngsters in new uniforms are evident. These places still exist, and when the fresh-faced boys at Walmart come across a tire/rim combo that their computer doesn't know, they'll send the customer to one of these places.

                    I had split rims on my Chevy 3/4 ton truck, with the solid rings, and I took the truck to Winston Tire in L.A. for new tires. I went into the customer lounge and waited... and waited. I kept hearing POUNDING... really loud pounding, and eventually walked out to see what was taking so long. The guy installing the tires was trying to pound the ring onto the rim with a sledge hammer. The rims were horriblly dented by the sledge hammer by this moron. With those rims/rings, it's the same as the Stude 3/4 ton rims/rings. There are two flat spots on opposite sides of the rim where the rings will just fit. I ended up scraping the rims and replacing them.
                    1953 Chev. 210 Convertible, 261 6cyl w/Offy dual intake (But I always did love Studebakers!)
                    1995 Dodge/Cummins Pickup, 250 HP, 620 Ft. Lbs. of Torque, ATS trans.
                    Robert Rausch

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                    • #11
                      So paying attention to PackardV8's advice, and being very careful by putting a rope around the rim at the opposite side of the notch in the rim and working with my face and body as clear as possible from harm, I started the removal of the ring.
                      Easy as pie, easier that doing a dirt bike tire imho. There is a notch in the ring that you start with, then out about 30 degrees each way from the notch is 2 flat spots in the ring. You simply use a big strong screw driver you begin to pry the ring outward and then I used a tire spoon to keep the ring supported, then I put another spoon under the ring and gently tapped it with a dead blow mallet and as the ring spread around to the other flat spot, it popped off with NO drama. easy peezy.

                      Thanx for all of your help. She will be a roller as soon as I can find a few tubes.

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