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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
    Gary; There is no evidence that a Six cylinder Garford engine ever powered a car with a Studebaker name on it (nor was it available). In fact there is no evidence that a 1911 Studebaker Garford was ever built. Studebaker severed its relationship with Garford in late 1910 or early 1911. After that date Garford continued to market cars under its own name. The last Garford automobile was built in 1913 though truck production continued to 1930 or so. They did offer a Six cylinder engine briefly but again this was after the business relationship with Studebaker had ended. The Four cylinder used in the 1910 Studebaker Garfords had a bore and stroke of 4 3/4 X 5 1/4." I believe this computes to around 372 c.i. During that era the standard of engine measurement used in all advertising was in terms of horsepower and never cubic inch displacement. Of course the metric measurement of "litres" was never used. Curious as to why you would use the metric measurement of 6.5 litres? I believe that translates to 396.6 c.i. I would welcome comments.
    Thanks Richard. I was expecting you to chime in somewhere along the way. You know MUCH more about prewar cars than I do.
    I tried to be carefull in my wording of the question. I said "...engine used by Studebaker...", not "...with a Studebaker name on it..."
    My understanding, from Garford information, is that Garford made chassis for Studebaker to body.
    I used litres because that is what the Garford information used.
    I believe that Garford was acquired by Willys-Overland in 1912 and built Willys-Knight cars 1913-1915.
    As I initially stated, "...I am open to correction." Thanks for your input.

    I got into Garfords because one of my nephews just learned of a barn find Garfield that has been tucked away for a long time until the owner died (famiiar story).

    Leave a comment:


  • Studebaker Wheel
    replied
    Gary; There is no evidence that a Six cylinder Garford engine ever powered a car with a Studebaker name on it (nor was it available). In fact there is no evidence that a 1911 Studebaker Garford was ever built. Studebaker severed its relationship with Garford in late 1910 or early 1911. After that date Garford continued to market cars under its own name. The last Garford automobile was built in 1913 though truck production continued to 1930 or so. They did offer a Six cylinder engine briefly but again this was after the business relationship with Studebaker had ended. The Four cylinder used in the 1910 Studebaker Garfords had a bore and stroke of 4 3/4 X 5 1/4." I believe this computes to around 372 c.i. During that era the standard of engine measurement used in all advertising was in terms of horsepower and never cubic inch displacement. Of course the metric measurement of "litres" was never used. Curious as to why you would use the metric measurement of 6.5 litres? I believe that translates to 396.6 c.i. I would welcome comments.
    Last edited by Studebaker Wheel; 09-18-2011, 11:35 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by studegary View Post
    What was the largest displacement passenger car engine used by Studebaker (bonus - year/years)?

    I believe that I remember the correct answer, but I am open to correction.
    What I believe to be the correct answer is the 6.5 litre six cylinder engine in the chassis provided to Studebaker by Garford, Elyria, Ohio in 1911.

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by Deaf Mute View Post
    I give up. So when you gonna give me the answer?
    I thought that one week would be a reasonable amount of time for everyone that wants to weigh in to get involved. Everyone is not on the SDC Forum every day (I know that some are on more than once per day.).

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  • Deaf Mute
    replied
    I give up. So when you gonna give me the answer?

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  • Joe_Studebaker_1977
    replied
    I am truly amazed of the knowledge this forum has in it's members. It is an honor to be apart of such a wise group of folks. I am a babe at heart in these cars when it comes to specs but if it helps I do carry on the name

    I will sit back and soak in the knowledge of others

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
    Maybe in one of the bigger S.P.A. trucks??

    Craig
    Refer to post no.10 by 2R5. This trivia question is restricted to passenger car engines.

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  • 8E45E
    replied
    Originally posted by Champ51 View Post
    The first year that Stude owned Pierce Arrow, PA had a 6 that displaced 415 cubic inches, but I've never heard that Studebaker used that engine. If they did, I want one of those cars. That was a cool engine.
    Maybe in one of the bigger S.P.A. trucks??

    Craig

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  • Champ51
    replied
    The first year that Stude owned Pierce Arrow, PA had a 6 that displaced 415 cubic inches, but I've never heard that Studebaker used that engine. If they did, I want one of those cars. That was a cool engine.

    Leave a comment:


  • 2R5
    replied
    Ya but Gary said Passenger car so that engine is out .....I think

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  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    The 383-ci, 98-hp Hercules WXC3 was used in the 1937 - 40 model J30 and J30M trucks.

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  • studegary
    replied
    For some reason, this thread hasn't shown up in my "What's New?" category/button. I am glad that I did a "search" for it.

    You guys are on the right track.
    I will give two clues.
    1) The engine is a six cylinder.
    2) The engine was made by another company for use/sale by Studebaker.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim B PEI
    replied
    Something tickles the back of my mind about 388 cu in. Early, possibly an 8? I have a 95%+ expectation that I am incorrect, though.

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  • 2R5
    replied
    1908 Garford Model B and 1909 Garford Model B 372.1 cu in

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
    I'm going with 372.1 cid.
    1909-1911
    Not the one that I had in mind.

    Leave a comment:

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