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Our Front Door: The Studebaker National Museum

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  • Our Front Door: The Studebaker National Museum

    Dick Quinn's encapsulation in Post #16 of this thread reminded me of something that happened about a month ago:

    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...debaker-Museum

    Everyone in our church (Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod; Carmel IN) knows me to be a Studebaker fanatic first and foremost. That's because Cari and I brought in a professionally-framed print of the Studebaker-themed poster Sunday Service and placed it, with a separate framed writing describing it, in the church's fellowship hall. (In fact, the poster and descriptor is on the wall right between the entrances to the two rest rooms, so everybody sees it sooner or later! <GGG>)

    So about a month ago, the gentleman half of a couple about our age (named Bob, of course), fellow members and friends of ours, approaches me one Sunday morning during coffee. He and his wife Marylin have a modest interest in history, but no particular interest in automobiles; cars are simply another appliance to them.

    But the previous day, Saturday, Bob said Marylin was on the internet, "looking for something to do for a day trip," and chanced onto a link to The Studebaker National Museum in South Bend.

    He said they drove to South Bend (from the Indianapolis area) specifically to "take in" The SNM. He then proceded to rave for several minutes about what a wonderful, interesting place it was, and how they had thoroughly enjoyed the trip, the museum, and their day. Again, this from folks who have zero interest in collector cars per se.

    Obviously, geographic realities preclude most Studebaker Drivers Club members from ever being able to visit the new museum, so it is heartening to know that the good work being done by and at the museum appeals to casual tourists and those seeking an adventure in Indiana history. Congrats and thanks to all "up there."

    Oh, and when we returned to our car after church, I noticed something had been placed, face down, under one windshield wiper. Bob and Marylin bought a BAIL OUT STUDEBAKER bumper sticker at the museum gift shop and brought it back to prove they were there! <GGG> BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 09-09-2011, 07:03 AM.
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

  • #2
    Great story! I love the picture you are referring to as, my Dad was a Lutheran Minister in Missouri in the 60's. I remember having one Sunday service a year in the park for the yearly Church picnic. Great memories.

    I have never been to the SNM, even to South Bend, although I have been a Studebaker owner since 1976. My wife and I are looking forward to the 2012 SB International Meet, just to visit the city and the meet and the SNM.

    It is the little things like hanging the picture at church that gets our Studebaker's seen and known. I drive my 64 Cruiser daily, just for this purpose.

    Thanks for sharing this and for keeping the Studebaker name alive.

    Mark

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    • #3
      For those who've never been to the SNM, my photos............http://s285.photobucket.com/albums/l...l%20%20Museum/

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Bullet View Post
        Great story! I love the picture you are referring to as, my Dad was a Lutheran Minister in Missouri in the 60's. I remember having one Sunday Service a year in the park for the yearly Church picnic. Great memories.

        I have never been to the SNM, even to South Bend, although I have been a Studebaker owner since 1976. My wife and I are looking forward to the 2012 SB International Meet, just to visit the city and the meet and the SNM.

        It is the little things like hanging the picture at church that gets our Studebaker's seen and known. I drive my 64 Cruiser daily, just for this purpose.

        Thanks for sharing this and for keeping the Studebaker name alive. Mark
        Enjoy your trip over, Mark, and prepared to be wowed when you see the new museum.

        The Studebaker National Museum was able to capitalize on the unfortunate passing of wealthy car collector S. Ray Miller in nearby Elkhart several years ago. The SNM bought one of Ray's cars (all of which were perfect). I think this is the one from the S. Ray Miller collection and if not, Dick Quinn will jump down my throat in short order with a correction:



        But the best "thing" they got was being able to hire Ray's Curator / Display Designer, one Don Filly (might be Filley; not sure). Don is a genius in creating interesting period displays of other items around each vehicle in the collection. That's what makes the museum so interesting and engaging; it's more than just row upon neat row of cars and trucks. Nice but, let's face it, boring if you aren't "into" cars alone.

        'Look forward to your trip; you and your wife will thoroughly enjoy it and go home with good memories to last a lifetime. 'Looking forward to meeting you. BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Took that car to an inventional show in Benton Harbor Mi. the 13 of last month. It was a chore getting a 70 year old body in and out from behind the steering wheel. Jim

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          • #6
            Yes, that is an S. Ray Miller car restored by Eric Lavine of Nappanee, IN http://lavinerestorations.com/contactus.html

            It is an outstanding restoration but those beautiful chrome wheels were never offered on this model. As Jim mentioned the seating is a little tight and it would not be comfortable for extended driving. In '31 Studebaker offered roadsters on only the model 54 Six and President Eight model 80 chassis. No Commanders or Dictators
            Richard Quinn
            Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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            • #7
              Just to further comment about Bob P's mention of row upon row of just cars. Yeras ago when the museum was just that, my Wife and others did not care to go to the museum. Then one year we went in and WOW, the period displays were tremendous. Now each year my Wife looks forward to going to see what has changed. I did not know the designers name but he has done 'one terrific job'! Each year I mention that fact to the museum staff and they really apprecate the feedback. stupak

              PS: We have been going to South Bend since the late 60's and have seen the demise of the Studebaker complex one building at a time. If you have never been to SB, you really owe it to yourself to get there. The museum itself is more than worth the trip. The feeling of actually being in South Bend is priceless.
              Last edited by stupak; 09-09-2011, 07:38 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                Everyone in our church (Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod; Carmel IN) knows me to be a Studebaker fanatic first and foremost. That's because Cari and I brought in a professionally-framed print of the Studebaker-themed poster Sunday Service and placed it, with a separate framed writing describing it, in the church's fellowship hall. (In fact, the poster and descriptor is on the wall right between the entrances to the two rest rooms, so everybody sees it sooner or later! <GGG>)
                LOL, Well Bob, you must have a much more... patient congregation than the one I attend. If I tried such a thing at the WELS I attend, they'd likely burn me at the stake in the front yard!
                Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                Ron Smith
                Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by studeclunker View Post
                  LOL, Well Bob, you must have a much more... patient congregation than the one I attend. If I tried such a thing at the WELS I attend, they'd likely burn me at the stake in the front yard!
                  Are you familiar with the Sunday Service poster, Ron? I did extensive research on it in 1990 when Minnesota SDCer Frank Frost first brought it out. The Pastor preaching from the bed of the new Studebaker pickup truck, Rev. Martin Galsted, was still living. I was able to correspond with him, and did, but he passed away June 1, 1999; 29 days shy of his 90th birthday.

                  The event in the poster / photograph is actually a June 4, 1950 Mission Festival Service at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Redwood Falls MN. That is a WELS congregation, so your congregation should like the poster, too!

                  As an aside (Small World Dept.), members of our congregation, the Beckers, their nephew is currently the full-time Pastor at St. John's in Redwood Falls! (His name isn't Becker, though; he comes from Mrs. Becker's side of the family.)

                  Boy, I can't see any reason why a congregation wouldn't want Sunday Service displayed in a fellowship hall; it is such a nice period photograph...with a new Studebaker pickup truck prominent, front & center! <GGG> BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  Ayn Rand:
                  "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Actually it was Baker Bros. Motors (not "Becker" as stated above) in Redwood Falls that loaned that pickup. My '53 coupe was sold new from Baker Bros. and I wish I could fine more "goodies" from that dealership to display with my '53. I have been in contact with one of the brother's Daughters; but she had no photos of the dealership... until some of us SDC'ers provided some to her.
                    I can't find my poster of that photo right now, may have to purchase another one and take it to church and hang in our library.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Deaf Mute View Post
                      Actually it was Baker Bros. Motors (not "Becker" as stated above) in Redwood Falls that loaned that pickup.
                      Duane, read my Post #9 again, slower; m-u-c-h s-l-o-w-e-r. I stated that Becker was the name of the couple in our church whose nephew is the current (i.e., 2011) Pastor at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Redwood Falls.

                      That has nothing to do with Baker Brothers Motors, the Studebaker dealership who supplied the new, 1950 Studebaker pickup used in the 1950 photograph from which the Sunday Service poster was created.

                      To confirm:

                      Becker, year 2011: Folks in the church in Carmel IN, where Cari and I are members.

                      Baker Brothers Motors, year 1950: Name of the franchised Studebaker dealership in Redwood Falls MN.

                      No relationship either way, nor was any originally implied or stated in Post #9. BP
                      Last edited by BobPalma; 09-09-2011, 09:05 PM.
                      We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                      Ayn Rand:
                      "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                      G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                      Comment

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