Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What was Lark image back then?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #61
    Reg Hillary (the 1961 winner) of the Shell 4000/ Trans Canada Rally recently spoke at our swap meet. He said that the Larks handled very well. However, they wore out the tires on the roads, and they had to be replaced at a gas station at the (then) prohibitive cost of $48 each, when Studebaker only paid $5 per tire. Since they won, it was apparently dropped as an issue.

    1964 Larks were Motor Trends(?) "Car of the Year".

    Roy O'Hallohan a successful 50s and 60s stock car driver in Ontario (not sure of spelling) liked the Larks for their handling. He was sponsored by a local dealship. (Gallinger?)

    Larks are a nice, zippy car, and fit in with the best produced - even today.

    Paul R

    Comment


    • #62
      quote:Originally posted by showbizkid

      My favorite example of "overseas second life" is Kaiser Argentina, which produced what was essentially the 1951 Manhattan, renamed the Carabela, all the way through 1962.
      Wow!!! A 1962 Kaiser Manhattan. What were the differences? Does anyone have pics of the Carabela?




      Ready for a trip to the beach!

      Comment


      • #63
        quote:Originally posted by showbizkid

        My favorite example of "overseas second life" is Kaiser Argentina, which produced what was essentially the 1951 Manhattan, renamed the Carabela, all the way through 1962.
        Wow!!! A 1962 Kaiser Manhattan. What were the differences? Does anyone have pics of the Carabela?




        Ready for a trip to the beach!

        Comment


        • #64

          1964 Larks were Motor Trends(?) "Car of the Year".

          It was 'Canada Track & Traffic' magazine's Car of the Year (Now called 'Carguide'). That magazine was VERY pro-Studebaker right to the end of production in 1966.

          Craig.

          Comment


          • #65

            1964 Larks were Motor Trends(?) "Car of the Year".

            It was 'Canada Track & Traffic' magazine's Car of the Year (Now called 'Carguide'). That magazine was VERY pro-Studebaker right to the end of production in 1966.

            Craig.

            Comment


            • #66
              quote:Originally posted by 8E45E

              quote:Originally posted by Studedude1961

              the "new" American marked the first and, so far, the last time a manufacturer brought back an old design from the dead. The tooling for the 1958 American was a slightly remodeled 1955 Rambler.
              I disagree with that one! Car manufacturers have been doing that for years, and still do to this day!! After a current body style runs its course here in North America, the dies get shipped to South America, or Australia, and become recycled 'new cars' to those markets. And the Eurpoeans do it as well. Probably the best known recycled car would be the Hindustan Ambassador, still sold in India, that started life in England as the 1954 Morris MO series Oxford. That car no doubt holds the record for having the oldest body stampings in the industry. In China, Shanghai Automotive Corporation bought up the MG and Rover assembly lines and parts from bankrupt Rover Group and shipped all over there. Now they are recycling the Rover 75 and MG-F models...

              Craig

              Comment


              • #67
                quote:Originally posted by 8E45E

                quote:Originally posted by Studedude1961

                the "new" American marked the first and, so far, the last time a manufacturer brought back an old design from the dead. The tooling for the 1958 American was a slightly remodeled 1955 Rambler.
                I disagree with that one! Car manufacturers have been doing that for years, and still do to this day!! After a current body style runs its course here in North America, the dies get shipped to South America, or Australia, and become recycled 'new cars' to those markets. And the Eurpoeans do it as well. Probably the best known recycled car would be the Hindustan Ambassador, still sold in India, that started life in England as the 1954 Morris MO series Oxford. That car no doubt holds the record for having the oldest body stampings in the industry. In China, Shanghai Automotive Corporation bought up the MG and Rover assembly lines and parts from bankrupt Rover Group and shipped all over there. Now they are recycling the Rover 75 and MG-F models...

                Craig

                Comment


                • #68
                  Craig check out Patrick Foster's excellent book, "AMC THE LAST INDEPENDENT" for the full story on the Rambler American...the first U.S. car design resurrected IN THE U.S. a few years after the dies and tooling had been mothballed (the 1958 American is basically a 1955 Rambler with the rear wheels opened up). THAT's what I meant by the post above. You are certainly correct that some Kaiser, Willys and other U.S. designs were later used in foreign countries, but I think people knew what I was referring to.

                  Studedude1961
                  --1963 Cruiser

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Craig check out Patrick Foster's excellent book, "AMC THE LAST INDEPENDENT" for the full story on the Rambler American...the first U.S. car design resurrected IN THE U.S. a few years after the dies and tooling had been mothballed (the 1958 American is basically a 1955 Rambler with the rear wheels opened up). THAT's what I meant by the post above. You are certainly correct that some Kaiser, Willys and other U.S. designs were later used in foreign countries, but I think people knew what I was referring to.

                    Studedude1961
                    --1963 Cruiser

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      quote:Wow!!! A 1962 Kaiser Manhattan. What were the differences? Does anyone have pics of the Carabela?
                      No differences, really! Here's a pic of a '61 (note Stude content!):


                      More here: http://oldcarandtruckpictures.com/Kaiser/
                      And scans of a '61 sales brochure here: http://www.kfnut.com/carabela/page1.html

                      Essentially, they made them until the body stamping dies wore out


                      [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                      Clark in San Diego
                      '63 F2/Lark Standard
                      http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                      Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        quote:Wow!!! A 1962 Kaiser Manhattan. What were the differences? Does anyone have pics of the Carabela?
                        No differences, really! Here's a pic of a '61 (note Stude content!):


                        More here: http://oldcarandtruckpictures.com/Kaiser/
                        And scans of a '61 sales brochure here: http://www.kfnut.com/carabela/page1.html

                        Essentially, they made them until the body stamping dies wore out


                        [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                        Clark in San Diego
                        '63 F2/Lark Standard
                        http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                        Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          ^^^ Thanks for the great picture of the Kaiser and the Stude!

                          Ready for a trip to the beach!

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            ^^^ Thanks for the great picture of the Kaiser and the Stude!

                            Ready for a trip to the beach!

                            Comment


                            • #74




                              More here: http://oldcarandtruckpictures.com/Kaiser/
                              And scans of a '61 sales brochure here: http://www.kfnut.com/carabela/page1.html

                              Essentially, they made them until the body stamping dies wore out

                              Thanks for the links! As many know IKA later made the '64-'69 Rambler American, and called it the Torino.

                              Craig

                              Comment


                              • #75




                                More here: http://oldcarandtruckpictures.com/Kaiser/
                                And scans of a '61 sales brochure here: http://www.kfnut.com/carabela/page1.html

                                Essentially, they made them until the body stamping dies wore out

                                Thanks for the links! As many know IKA later made the '64-'69 Rambler American, and called it the Torino.

                                Craig

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X