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removing oil stains from driveway

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  • #16
    One time I was changing oil in my 62 Champ...drained the old oil out, pulled out the pan and proceded to refill the engine...but forgot to replace the drain plug! (Pretty damn stupid!) When I saw what I had done, and after a few choice naughty words, I sopped up as much as I could with newspapers but it still left a stain. Too my surprise, after setting in our hot California sun for a few days all traces of the stain disappeared!...can't see a thing now. Glad it wasn't used oil.
    Lou Van Anne
    62 Champ
    64 R2 GT Hawk
    79 Avanti II

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    • #17
      Tide, hot water, and a push broom
      61 lark cruiser
      64 daytona 2dr hardtop

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      • #18
        Back in the late Devonian era, when the Houdra-Flow catalytic cracker was considered the most efficient industrial process in the world, we had access to almost unlimited amounts of used, clean limestone catalyst from the World's Greatest Refinery. The particles were the size of large sand grains, but round. There was some dust in there, too. Since the purpose of this grind was, duh, to absorb oil, if you caught a spill right quickly with a quick toss of catalyst, there was no stain. Distillation is done differently now, but the properties of fine limestone have not changed.

        Try using "screenings," or small pea gravel/coarse ag lime -- better yet, just the sweepings from these materials, the dusty part -- instead of cat litter. Oil, diluted oil, and oil/detergent sludge just jump into that stuff and stay there.

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        • #19
          Pour some gasoline on the oil spot(s). As soon as you get the gas on the oil stains, cover it with speedy dry. Use the plain speedy dry, not the dark clay stuff. All you have to do is wait and the speedy dry will pull the gas from the concrete along with the oil stain, then just sweep it up.
          I've done that by accident (don't ask) and yes, it works. Scared the hell out of me and I'm lucky to be alive to tell the tale. Never again!

          When I was old enough to tend the pool, I found that the muriatic acid we used to balance the ph in the pool...worked great on the driveway stains.
          I did that on my Dad's driveway when I was a kid. Thought I was pretty smart. It dissolved the top layer of the concrete, and left the drive with a big pit in the middle. Be very careful with that stuff, almost as dangerous as the gasoline method.

          I'll stick with the Purple Power.

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          • #20
            I've had good results on old and new stains alike with OilEater.
            Andy
            62 GT

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            • #21
              Sledge hammer.

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              • #22
                I've seen this work well on oil stained concrete: http://www.quikrete.com/productlines...altCleaner.asp

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                • #23
                  I've poured gas on the stain, used a push broom to work it in to the pores of the concrete then sprinkle
                  dry powdered cement mix and let it sit for a few days.
                  Sweep it up and hose it clean.
                  It's worked for me.
                  George King
                  Grants Pass, Oregon
                  64 Station Wagon with fixed roof (Canadian Car)

                  66 Station Wagon with fixed roof. Project car, complete For Sale...

                  64 Wagonaire sliding roof South Bend car. For Sale...

                  63 GT Hawk

                  51 Champion Starlight Coupe For Sale...

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                  • #24
                    I use Simple Green on asphalt. It does okay.

                    You know what's worse than oil on a driveway? Tire shine sprays.
                    I see Meguires is advertising their new spray as not leaving driveway mess. We'll see.
                    63 Avanti R1 2788
                    1914 Stutz Bearcat
                    (George Barris replica)

                    Washington State

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                    • #25
                      Ok, remove all the blacktop/concrete and use the dirt under it or add gravel lol sorry it sounded the easiest. I know you wont so I think there is a acid to do the job.someone prob said this I did not read the thread. I think it is meratis if I am not mistaken but I could be wrone so check into it.and with acid it is important to remember that BAKING SODA NEUTRALIZES ACID! if you did noy know that, there you go. if you did, well it is there for someone else to learn. J/k on the gravel/dirt though...

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                      • #26
                        when you do this, grind it in with your feet like doing the "twist". what it does is gets into the oil/stain better. I di it all the time. I am and have been a mechanic/hobiest for over 30 yrs. it will not remove it completely but getter than normal.

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                        • #27
                          When I back the Avanti out of the garage I park in the street and go back and cover any oil spots with oil dry step on it and with my foot grind it into the spot, days later I sweep up the oil dry and no oil stain in the drive. Oil dry is no longer OK'ed by the EPA (Every Ones Pain in the Ass) but I was able to buy 10 bags from a Auto parts store going out of business sale for 25 cents a bag. Lng live leakly Studebakers.

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                          • #28
                            Backin the 50s when i worked in a service station we would use oil dri and had an old broom with 2x4s on the bottom. we just ground in the oil dri into the concrete, drive always looked good after we finished.
                            101st Airborne Div. 326 Engineers Ft Campbell Ky.

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