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Studebaker demise a good thing?

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  • Studebaker demise a good thing?


  • #2
    Discussed before:

    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...highlight=2005

    Craig

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    • #3
      Craig-

      Sorry to post it anew. I asked if someone had posted it, and my source said to post it. My bad.

      It reminded me of my son's wedding in California, when I asked my ex-wife's husband if I should talk to my ex and he told me "go ahead" [she hates my guts - then, now, and forever]. Oh well, I make a lot of mistakes.

      But let me ask for help: I don't want to cover old subjects, and as I had a 40-year lapse in my SDC membership, is there anyone who will volunteer to vet my ideas or submissions? C'mon, someone volunteer, please.

      Alan Hagan

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      • #4
        Hi Alan,

        I had one of those conversations with my ex-mother-in-law at our daughters wedding......sigh.....

        Thanks for bringing up the topic as I had missed the first go-round and enjoy the "what ifs". The Avanti was clearly a desirable car with long term appeal as demonstrated by Newman and Altman. My personal regret is that Studebaker didn't continue with the Lark. I believe the Lark had enormous potential and could have stood "toe to toe" with the big three. I'm not convinced that my interest in Studebakers comes as a result of them leaving the industry when they did but more so by the sparks of brilliant design that continue to speak to my heart.

        Thanks again,
        John Brayton

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        • #5
          Originally posted by alanahasan View Post
          It reminded me of my son's wedding in California, when I asked my ex-wife's husband if I should talk to my ex and he told me "go ahead" [she hates my guts - then, now, and forever].
          I fail to see how being directed to a previous thread compares to a failed marriage; especially when it gives several answers and/or opinions to your inquiry as stated in your last paragraph asking for others' thoughts on the subject.

          Craig

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          • #6
            Alan, one mistake in your posting is blaming Exner for the Avanti. I believe you meant to say Egbert.
            As for the end of Studebaker production, I think it would have been ideal if all Studebaker production could have ended with the close of the South Bend facility. The 1965 & 66 Studebakers though nice, do not seem like a genuine Studebaker to me being that they don't have a Studebaker engine and also because other parts/components were no longer manufactured in the South Bend plant. At least the Avanti II continued to be built in an original South Bend Studebaker facility into the 1980's and furthermore it feels more like a Studebaker to me than a 1965-66 Studebaker because of this.
            Rather than wish that Studebaker had continued production into the 1970's or beyond, I wish that Studebaker had done some things differently in the 1950's and early 1960's when production was going strong. So many things that I look back on and wish they had done differently. But, the past is the past and nothing is perfect.
            sigpic
            In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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            • #7
              While reading this Thread, it has come up again! The Lark? and what a wonderful car it was, and how it could have stood toe to toe with the big three, and kept Studebaker going?????
              I disagree whole heartedly! I Love Studebakers because of the design and how far ahead of the rest of the pack they were. But, the Lark? There was no design! It is a box! The box that took the company down......the glimmer of hope was the Avanti, which was so far ahead of its time, that non car people ( those who just see cars as transportion) could not grasp enopugh to save a company that was staying alive by selling "little ugly boxes made of ticky tacky that all looked just the same".
              Sorry Lark owners! Please don't kick me off the forum or hate me. But, I just can't see the appeal???
              Good Roads
              Brian
              C/K lover to the end!
              Brian Woods
              woodysrods@shaw.ca
              1946 M Series (Shop Truck)

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              • #8
                I think the issue with the Lark Brian is that it had room for 6 adults in comfort - was more economical than competitors (until the Falcon Valiant and Corvair anyway) and served a need for a smaller American car that was practical. I love my 1962 but - as you say - it's not that flashy compared to the Avanti, which was a good try but I expect the end has come, can anyone imagine production starting again?

                Still we love "our" company, they did a lot with a little, and I honor the memory of those involved.
                John Clements
                Christchurch, New Zealand

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                • #9
                  I would agree that the Lark actually bouyed up Studebaker for longer than it would have stayed afloat without it. I guess we could accuse the Lark of getting Studebaker's hopes for success up a little longer than was practical in reality. However, without it we might have missed some very exciting automobiles, of course the general public missed them anyway even though those cars exisited right in front of their faces.
                  Joe Roberts
                  '61 R1 Champ
                  '65 Cruiser
                  Eastern North Carolina Chapter

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                    Alan, one mistake in your posting is blaming Exner for the Avanti. I believe you meant to say Egbert.
                    As for the end of Studebaker production, I think it would have been ideal if all Studebaker production could have ended with the close of the South Bend facility. The 1965 & 66 Studebakers though nice, do not seem like a genuine Studebaker to me being that they don't have a Studebaker engine and also because other parts/components were no longer manufactured in the South Bend plant. At least the Avanti II continued to be built in an original South Bend Studebaker facility into the 1980's and furthermore it feels more like a Studebaker to me than a 1965-66 Studebaker because of this.
                    Rather than wish that Studebaker had continued production into the 1970's or beyond, I wish that Studebaker had done some things differently in the 1950's and early 1960's when production was going strong. So many things that I look back on and wish they had done differently. But, the past is the past and nothing is perfect.
                    I will respectfully disagree there: the 1965-66 'Chevy' Baker and subsequent Avantis till ca. 1985 have helped keep older Studes on the road between more donors/builders as well as a wide base of vehicles for replacement parts availability.
                    --------------------------------------

                    Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                    Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                    "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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                    • #11
                      don't forget about the the early avanti production problems and cancellations of orders.

                      alan, write away! (at least about studebaker topics ) use the "search" feature to discover if the topic has been covered before. many of us weren't regular followers of the forum years ago.
                      Kerry. SDC Member #A012596W. ENCSDC member.

                      '51 Champion Business Coupe - (Tom's Car). Purchased 11/2012.

                      '40 Champion. sold 10/11. '63 Avanti R-1384. sold 12/10.

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                      • #12
                        Hey I love my LARKS and all other Studebakers, But I dont think it helped that were still using early 50s suspension technology still into the last production of cars, which in my mind was crap.
                        Tom
                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          If I was going to blame any one person for Studebaker's demise it would be Albert Erskine. If he hadn't kept paying out dividends going into the depression Studebaker might have avoided receivership and come out of the Depression as a much stronger company.
                          Jeff DeWitt
                          http://carolinastudes.net

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JeffDeWitt View Post
                            If I was going to blame any one person for Studebaker's demise it would be Albert Erskine. If he hadn't kept paying out dividends going into the depression Studebaker might have avoided receivership and come out of the Depression as a much stronger company.
                            I would agree with this, what were they thinking anyway!
                            Tom
                            sigpic

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                            • #15
                              By the 60s, there was no way an independent could survive against the R&D, production, pricing and marketing of the "Big 3".

                              The Lark could have been the best car in the world and not have saved Studebaker in the long run. Read Pat Foster's book about the old plants, high labor costs and too generous shareholder dividends.
                              As it is, compared to newer compacts coming out in the 60s (Like the MT "Car of the Year" winning 63 Ramblers) the Lark was showing its age.
                              It and the GT were based on a 50s platform, and while a nice attention getter, the Avanti, with a loaded price tag of $5000+, was not going to sell in the numbers to "save" the firm, any more than its competition did (Buick did not live or die on the Riveria, Chevy on the Corvette, Ford on the T-Bird).
                              63 Avanti R1 2788
                              1914 Stutz Bearcat
                              (George Barris replica)

                              Washington State

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