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Great period photo, fiind the Studebaker(s).

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  • Great period photo, fiind the Studebaker(s).

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=280705306153

    No prizes offered.
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  • #2
    If Chris Dresbach misses the prominent Studebaker, he'll need to be granted a Leave of Absence from Studebaker International to attend SSS (Studebaker Summer School). <GGG> BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the heads up on this photo Richard. I just turned on the computer and checked the forum this morning and found your thread. Great way to start the day. Although I was an infant when this photo was taken, I still remember when people were not so isolated. Notice that there are no air conditioned cars with their windows rolled up. People are actually interacting or at least exposed enough where it is possible. Stores have "store fronts" and are not surrounded by a monster parking lot. No one is wearing sun screen, talking on a cell or distracted by an ipod.

      At this time, most people will go home and listen to a radio. A few will have a television or know someone who has one. Many will have electric refrigerators but still refer to them as the "ice box." Boys will still look like boys and have hair cuts that look like they got their moneys worth in getting it. Little girls will have paper "cut-out" dolls and look like little girls. Most boys would have a pocket full of marbles. Many will have holes in their pants at the knees from wallowing on the ground while playing with them.

      I could go on...but a few moments reflecting is a good way to start the day. Oh...and I think I see at least one "Skyway" looking Studebaker!
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

      Comment


      • #4
        There were only about 7000 television sets in the entire country when that picture was taken! No stations even transmitting in St. Petes. They look like they all got out of the house to enjoy the moment of a war finally ending. What a great moment in time photo. Thanks RQ.

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        • #5
          I am guessing it is the secong car on the left, a '40 sedan.

          \"QUIGLEY DOWN UNDER\"
          MELBOURNE.

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          • #6
            The second one along the curb is a 1941 Champion Cruising sedan and the 5th one along the curb could be a 41 Commander. The one that appears to have some sort of a luggage rack or something attached to the roof.
            Frank van Doorn
            Omaha, Ne.
            1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
            1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
            1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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            • #7
              I was in Highland Hospital, Beacon, NY having my appendix removed when this picture was taken. Our car then was a 1940 Plymouth that was very similar to the 1941 Plymouth behind the 1941 Studebaker at the curb.
              Gary L.
              Wappinger, NY

              SDC member since 1968
              Studebaker enthusiast much longer

              Comment


              • #8
                What strikes me about the photo is the nature of car design. I suppose some complain about todays cars all looking the same... but to the untrained eye, don't all these cars look the "same"? The 50s really shook things up, though.
                sigpicsals54

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
                  If Chris Dresbach misses the prominent Studebaker, he'll need to be granted a Leave of Absence from Studebaker International to attend SSS (Studebaker Summer School). <GGG> BP
                  Well I definately see a '41. Not sure if I see a '40 though.
                  Chris Dresbach

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I count four Studebakers. Two along the curb headed to the right and two twins in traffice headed to the left. They all look like 41's, maybe 40's sedans.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      "What strikes me about the photo is the nature of car design. I suppose some complain about todays cars all looking the same... but to the untrained eye, don't all these cars look the 'same'?"

                      Actually I could not disagree more. I can name most all of the cars in this photo but put me in similar traffic today and I probably could not recognize one in ten."

                      As for Studebakers I can only find two (for sure) and those are cars number two and five along the curb (as mentioned by 41 Frank and others), both ‘41s. I do not believe any of the cars facing away from the camera are Studebakers.
                      Richard Quinn
                      Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
                        "What strikes me about the photo is the nature of car design. I suppose some complain about todays cars all looking the same... but to the untrained eye, don't all these cars look the 'same'?"

                        Actually I could not disagree more. I can name most all of the cars in this photo but put me in similar traffic today and I probably could not recognize one in ten."
                        Easy, Dick; you're only going to get modest variations when your design computer sprays a gentle shower of water over a bar of soap in a wind tunnel for a few hours. <GGG> BP
                        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                        Ayn Rand:
                        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by barnlark View Post
                          They look like they all got out of the house to enjoy the moment of a war finally ending.
                          They'll all be out of the house today if it were today, too! Only everyone wil be in the BAR pounding back a few cool ones watching it live on the Bigscreen!!

                          Craig

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sals54 View Post
                            What strikes me about the photo is the nature of car design. I suppose some complain about todays cars all looking the same... but to the untrained eye, don't all these cars look the "same"? The 50s really shook things up, though.
                            Completely agree. To my eye, most all the Teens look the same; then the Twenties look the same; then the early Thirties look the same, then the late Thirties' Art Deco styling look the same; then the 40s all the same, then the early 50s. Starting in 55-56 they became really individual through the mid-late 80s, then faded into sameness until the retro Mustang redesign started bringing back a little individuality. Today the Retros (Mustang, Challenger, Camaro) stand out, which hopefully will become a long-term trend.

                            Of course, there are exceptions, but by and large that's how I've seen them. Maybe it's to do with your personal era.

                            Personally, I will drive a compact car if they can make one that favors a '60 Lark
                            Proud NON-CASO

                            I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                            If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth—let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                            GOD BLESS AMERICA

                            Ephesians 6:10-17
                            Romans 15:13
                            Deuteronomy 31:6
                            Proverbs 28:1

                            Illegitimi non carborundum

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bob Andrews View Post
                              Completely agree. To my eye, most all the Teens look the same; then the Twenties look the same; then the early Thirties look the same, then the late Thirties' Art Deco styling look the same; then the 40s all the same, then the early 50s. Starting in 55-56 they became really individual through the mid-late 80s, then faded into sameness until the retro Mustang redesign started bringing back a little individuality. Today the Retros (Mustang, Challenger, Camaro) stand out, which hopefully will become a long-term trend.

                              Of course, there are exceptions, but by and large that's how I've seen them. Maybe it's to do with your personal era.

                              Personally, I will drive a compact car if they can make one that favors a '60 Lark
                              I might concur that cars thru the late 20s were quite similar. However I could not agree that most cars of the 1930s looked the same. For illustration see the images below, all 1939 Coupes. If you can say with conviction that these cars all looked the same you need your glasses changed! Maybe its just that you are not familiar with that era?

                              Richard Quinn
                              Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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