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In the path of the storm Studebakers at risk

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  • In the path of the storm Studebakers at risk

    http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/e...g?t=1304449278http://www3.gendisasters.com/oklahom...do%2C-apr-1942
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

  • #2



    Two close ups showing the Studebakers.
    Richard Quinn
    Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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    • #3




      This one in Woodward, Oklahoma on April 9, 1947 was even worse and is described as being the "The longest, widest and most destructive tornado ever to occur in this area"
      The tornado was on the ground for 221 miles thru three states and killed 338 people, 169 who lived in Woodward. See: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ok/count...ard/intro.html
      for more information. In the photo above the remains of a late ‘20’s Chevrolet is shown in the foreground with a M Series Studebaker truck and a ’42 Champion in the background. No damage is discernable on either Studebaker but the Champion lost a hub cap. That appears to be a Phillips 66 station behind the two Studebakers.
      Richard Quinn
      Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post


        M Series Studebaker truck and a '42 Champion in the background. No damage is discernable on either Studebaker but the Champion lost a hub cap.
        Geeze: Unless my eyes deceive me, check out that cattle-guard-quality grille protector in front of the M-series' grille! I'll bet that's one peice of M-series vertical nose stainless Matthew Burnette won't have to straighten. What a battering ram! BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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        • #5
          Any M-truck grille strip would be easier than the Chevy's radiator shell!

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          • #6
            These pictures should serve to remind us that nothing we are experiencing today is really new. The numbers attached to the damage these days are bigger. But the relative value of the losses are probably the same. The big difference is the speed and wide coverage of how these events get communicated.
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jclary View Post
              These pictures should serve to remind us that nothing we are experiencing today is really new. The numbers attached to the damage these days are bigger. But the relative value of the losses are probably the same. The big difference is the speed and wide coverage of how these events get communicated.
              Indeed! The most horrific tornado in U.S. history occurred here in Southern Illinois (and Missouri and Indiana) on March 19, 1925. It was called the tristate tornado and killed 695 people. The F5 tornado was on the ground for an incredible 219 miles. I am sure there were a lot of Studebakers destroyed in that one! See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tri-State_Tornado
              Richard Quinn
              Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Studebaker Wheel View Post
                Indeed! The most horrific tornado in U.S. history occurred here in Southern Illinois (and Missouri and Indiana) on March 19, 1925.
                What are your personal recollections of that one?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mbstude View Post
                  What are your personal recollections of that one?
                  Like Dorothy I hit my head and don't remember too much. I do recall in my delirium something about a yellow brick road and "The Wizard of Studebaker." I was never quite the same after that.
                  Richard Quinn
                  Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here's a little more recent one. Last Wednesday night. 53 Starliner

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                    • #11
                      More vintage storm stuff . . . . .

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by aarrggh View Post
                        More vintage storm stuff . . . . .

                        Hmmmm, Aarrggh: That 1962 Bel-Air 4-door is the exact car in which I took Driver Education in spring 1962. There was this one girl in the car with us and if I recall, the destruction in the photo may simply be the result of her just having "navigated" that street!

                        The car did come through pretty well, though, so they may not be it....<GGG> (Ours was a 283, too, and I see that one is Stovebolt Six motivated by virtue of no engine identification in front of the LF wheel.) BP
                        Last edited by BobPalma; 05-04-2011, 06:49 AM.
                        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                        Ayn Rand:
                        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                        Comment

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