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The photo that started it all

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  • (S)
    replied
    Looks like engine break in and valve adjustments happening. those hoods would be in the way, so they are off to the side and the rags on the fenders for oil splash and to protect the fenders...... I do believe those ducts are for venting the room. You can almost see the fumes still hanging in the air from a long days work......

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  • jclary
    replied
    I have studied the photo a little more and speculate the following;

    It looks to me as if there is some type of "post assembly" retro-fit or repair that required the work to be done from the driver's side since the fenders on that side have protective covers. It could be that - 1) something happened during assembly that was not caught until later 2) it was determined cheaper to keep the line moving and fix the problem later - 3) assembly could have run out of a certain part that had to be installed "off-line."

    I have seen these scenarios in modern auto plants. During the initial start-up phase at the local BMW plant, they ran out of metric bolts and finished some assembly using nominal bolts after raiding a few local hardware stores just to keep the line moving. All the cars from this run were scrapped.

    As far as the pipes seen in the pictures, you have to realize that Studebaker had suffered several catastrophic fires by this time and these could be water sources for in plant fire fighting, or a system for connecting automotive engine exhaust when needed for operating an engine in an enclosed building. Also, the pipes appear to be wrapped in insulation (probably the dreaded asbestos material). By this time many of their buildings had been retrofitted from being used in horse-drawn vehicles to automobiles.

    Whatever the situation, this must have been an interesting and exciting time. Wouldn't you like to have a brief time travel moment to walk through this building touching and smelling the scene as you listen to the echo of your foot steps. What a moment in time!

    (Edit: I went back once again and enlarged the picture. Looking again at the column pipes, it looks to be like sheet metal stove-pipe. I think it is an "air handling" system for taking away engine exhaust.)
    Last edited by jclary; 03-15-2011, 07:02 AM.

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  • 65cruiser
    replied
    Maybe they're fancy heaters?

    Originally posted by tutone63 View Post
    The flourescent lamp was patented around 1907, but not used heavily until after the 1920's. It could be flourescent, but at the time, Mercury vapor lamps (which were deveoloped a little earlier) were used for industrial applications more so than the flourescent type. I would guess they are Mercury Vapor lights....but just a guess.

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  • tutone63
    replied
    Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
    Wow! when did flourescent lights come about?
    The flourescent lamp was patented around 1907, but not used heavily until after the 1920's. It could be flourescent, but at the time, Mercury vapor lamps (which were deveoloped a little earlier) were used for industrial applications more so than the flourescent type. I would guess they are Mercury Vapor lights....but just a guess.

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  • TXmark
    replied
    Originally posted by aarrggh View Post
    I believe this to be a secret underwater lab , As there are several mounted periscopes for workers to check for spys from other automakers sneaking around above . .

    I think those Minnesnowta winters have caused some frostbite to the brain, get out in the sun more often

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  • bezhawk
    replied
    Wow! when did flourescent lights come about?

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  • pushrod63
    replied
    I think you figured it out.
    Originally posted by tutone63 View Post
    I am no scholar...but from the looks of things either these cars look like they are in for damage related repairs or are getting ready to get 'recycled'. The reason I say this is because it looks like they all have front-end damage. It looks almost like the damage is similar from car to car--possibly damaged during shipping on a train possibly? The fender in the lower left corner definetly looks mangled. The fluid could be attributed to coolant leaking from the damaged radiators. My guess is some new models suffered an accident somehow on the way to a dealership or other destination and are awaiting repairs. Just a guess...

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  • tutone63
    replied
    I am no scholar...but from the looks of things either these cars look like they are in for damage related repairs or are getting ready to get 'recycled'. The reason I say this is because it looks like they all have front-end damage. It looks almost like the damage is similar from car to car--possibly damaged during shipping on a train possibly? The fender in the lower left corner definetly looks mangled. The fluid could be attributed to coolant leaking from the damaged radiators. My guess is some new models suffered an accident somehow on the way to a dealership or other destination and are awaiting repairs. Just a guess...

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  • raprice
    replied
    Gee, I thought my Stude was the only one that leaves a mark. (grin).
    Seriously, I still fondly remember my dad's '39 Commander. He bought it when I was 2 years old. I remember those rides in the back seat going to visit relatives. It's amazing how I remember how quiet it was and how smooth the ride was. I wouldn't mind owning one just like Dad's.
    Rog

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  • aarrggh
    replied
    I believe this to be a secret underwater lab , As there are several mounted periscopes for workers to check for spys from other automakers sneaking around above . .

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  • Chris_Dresbach
    replied
    One thing is for sure, it's not the dyno room. I know exactly where the dyno room was in the engineering building and the wondow line in the photo is physically too long to be it. They also never ran that many cars at the same time on a dyno. When I was working in the engineering building, I only counted two spots where an in floor dyno roller would have been. It has to be somewhere out in the plant, but where???

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  • jclary
    replied
    I see a combination of steel and artillery spoked wheels. It also seems like there is a protective cover on all the driver's side front fenders.

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  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by 53commander View Post
    Does there seem to be fluid coming from under all of them?
    Maybe it's where they install the Studebaker factory oil leaks.

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  • 53commander
    replied
    Does there seem to be fluid coming from under all of them?

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  • fargoguy
    replied
    From the looks of the first three cars on the left- looks like it could be the Headlight Alignment Room!

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