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Studebaker Electric Wagon Restoration

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  • StudeDave57
    replied
    Looks you made a good call as to the restoration shop~
    It is turning out to be quite an awesome machine!!!

    I can hardly wait to drive that thing...
    I do get to drive it, right?

    Leave a comment:


  • jclary
    replied
    Fantastic project. I am as impressed with the workmanship, shop, and the neatness of the work area as I am the vehicle.

    Please, don't ever show up around my man cave...I'd be too embarrassed!

    Leave a comment:


  • STEWDI
    replied
    James - your restoration is inspiring!!!

    It will be a great day when you can ring the bell ( I'm assuming she has one)and then pilot her (does she have a name yet?). What a great history lesson for all who see her!!

    Here's hoping all goes smoothly.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4hawks
    replied
    Hi James,
    Your doing an incredible job, I can't wait until I can come up there and see it. By the way, how's that little red 56 Transtar doing? There's many a day, when I wish I would have kept that little rig!

    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • Corvanti
    replied
    Originally posted by Michidan View Post
    Amazing. The problem I have working with wood is that it's so darn hard to weld.
    you're using the wrong welder. try the $89 one from china freight.

    beautiful work on the electric!!! here's "our" NC 1903:
    Click image for larger version

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  • Michidan
    replied
    Amazing. The problem I have working with wood is that it's so darn hard to weld.

    Leave a comment:


  • sweetolbob
    replied
    You just can't post too many pictures of this project.

    Great work, Please keep posting on a regular basis.

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • raoul5788
    replied
    I am thoroughly impressed with this work. It's amazing!

    Leave a comment:


  • BobGlasscock
    replied
    Beautiful work. And that wood is just georgeous!! Love what you are accomplishing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bellingham Studenut
    replied
    Electric Wagon Update

    Updates on Restoring the Studebaker Electric Wagon


    Painted the undercarriage:








    Restored the Tailgate:












    Tailgate Chain:













    Making the Seat:





















    Getting closer to finishing the body.
    Then onward to the wheels, frame and some electrical!

    James Bell

    Leave a comment:


  • Bordeaux Daytona
    replied
    Here's a picture of the SNM's Studebaker electric that was used in Washington D.C.
    This one was called Peg, I can't remember what the other one was called.
    I'm glad to see that the other one still exists!
    John V.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • mausersmth
    replied
    Originally posted by barnlark View Post
    That '02 looks huge! If my limited local Studebaker history memory cells serve me correctly, that info tag in that picture is incorrect. I'm fairly sure the 1902 vehicles were all built in Cleveland on Garford frames from their nearby Elyria factory. They moved all horseless production soon after to South Bend. Someone from the Antique Studebaker Club should know the exact final move date from Cleveland. 1903? '04?

    By the way, great work, James. Looks amazing already.
    As I understand it Garford made chassis for the gas model cars only, electrics were done in house at South Bend. All bodies were South Bend built until the E-M-F deal of '08. (E-M-F/Flanders made there own bodies.)
    The electrics resembled the horse drawn carriages so much, only motors and electricals had to be outsourced. Westinghouse, I believe.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris_Dresbach
    replied
    Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
    This 1908 Studebaker electric is displayed at the Swigart Museum in Huntingdon, Pa. It is one of two built to carry legislators through the subway between the U.S. Capitol building and legislative offices. I believe the other still exists but do not know where it is displayed. Still a resource for evaluating battery and motive power.



    http://www.swigartmuseum.com/
    The other one is here in South Bend in the SNM. I find it interesting that the one in your photo is varnished wood, but the other in the SNM is painted yellow. Interesting. I like the old electrics.

    Leave a comment:


  • Drummerboy
    replied
    Hi James
    It would be great to see it at the SDC meet in New West in August. If not, would it be possible to view it in Bellingham? Lucas tire has some white tires available. Don't know if they are solid or not. They are 30 X 3". I have attached a pic and the URL for them. Well done, so far! http://www.lucasclassictires.com/
    BrianClick image for larger version

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  • Bellingham Studenut
    replied
    Hopefully it will be driving on September 10th for "Drive Your Studebaker Day" and on display at the Museum in Bellingham.
    I'm hoping to have Jerry drive it after all the work he's been putting into it.

    There may also be another very historical Studebaker displayed that day (during it's restoration).
    I will give an update of that one on another thread soon.


    It's a shame having to paint over the wagons nice woodwork, but originally it was painted black with red chassis (looking for lead paint & Whale blubber).

    All electric Studebaker vehicles originally had Westinghouse motor's.

    Note:
    George Westinghouse married Marguerite Erskine Walker.
    Their summer home - and the place Marguerite Erskine Walker loved the most, was Erskine Manor in the Berkshires in Massachusetts.
    Mr. and Mrs. Westinghouse had one son (George III) who married and moved to Vancouver BC.
    We purchased a 1932 Canadian built Rockne Sedan that came from a large Mansion owned by the Westinghouse family in BC.
    Stored along with the Rockne were several high priced newer cars.
    Why would they have such a low priced car if they could have bought a fancier President model?
    And Albert Erskine was President of Studebaker when the Rockne was made?
    Perhaps coincidence?
    Another car, another story...

    The wagon wheels had solid white rubber tires (prior to when carbon black was added to white rubber tires) and seem difficult to find replacements.
    Black rubber is available, but would prefer white.

    Looking for other pictures of commercial Studebaker electric wagons if anyone has some.

    Thanks!

    James
    Last edited by Bellingham Studenut; 02-24-2011, 09:28 PM.

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