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Studebaker Electric Wagon Restoration

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  • 52hawk
    replied
    Originally posted by rockne10 View Post
    This 1908 Studebaker electric is displayed at the Swigart Museum in Huntingdon, Pa. It is one of two built to carry legislators through the subway between the U.S. Capitol building and legislative offices. I believe the other still exists but do not know where it is displayed. Still a resource for evaluating battery and motive power.



    http://www.swigartmuseum.com/
    I saw the other one at the Studebaker museum in SB. It was painted yellow. I don't know if it is still there or not. They were built to go either direction,because there was no room to turn around in the subway.
    Last edited by 52hawk; 05-01-2012, 01:46 PM.

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  • tomsamson
    replied
    I just thought I'd bump this thread and beg for a project update!

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  • kmac530
    replied
    WOW !!!!! What a craftsman and a true piece of history. What a priveledge to get to watch this build.

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  • tomsamson
    replied
    I'm looking forward to the October update on this project. The progress to date have been fantastic.

    Tom.

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  • Bellingham Studenut
    replied
    Studebaker Electric Update 9/1/11

    Since the wagon did not have the chain and front gears when we got it, we decided to make something close, then realized a Studebaker 27 axle from aprox 50 years later would work nicely!!! Somewhat modified, but still Studebaker.
    Jerry being a retired machinist and "Craftsman With A Flair", did a great job of recycling some Studebaker metal for this hybred horseless wagon.

    Preparing a Stude Dana 27








    Make some gears with correct ratio, pitch and teeth for required power and speed.



    Mount it in the correct place.





    Adjustable Tension needed.



    Luckily we didn't have to make the chain from scratch for the non-removable ring gear on the brake drums.
    The brake drums have expandable shoes inside the metal drums, at a time when most wagons had a block of wood pressing on outside of wheels.
    Top speed was 5-10 mph with a range up to 40 miles.

    James Bell

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  • kurtruk
    replied
    Can't recall if you need a motor or not. Here's one:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1910-...Q5fAccessories

    I'd try Coker for the tires. Corky seems like someone who could help. Until about 15 years ago we had Pope Tire here in Fresno that still vulcanized hard tires onto rims and other such work. He was the oldest indepedant tire dealer in California when he closed. Don't know what happened to his equipment.

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  • studeclunker
    replied
    I do find interesting the transition vehicles like this. Utterly impractical, but fun if one has the resources.

    My compliments on your wagon body, it's beautiful. Like Bob, I'm looking forward to new pics. However, as a dial-up member, would you be so kind as to start another thread? This one is getting difficult to load. Worth it, certainly, but difficult.

    Also, the dashboard (or simply dash) was called that because of the detritus that was 'dashed' up by the horse's feet. Thus it kept the majority of it off the driver and front passenger. Carriage, Buggy, and wagon drivers usually also wore a lap apron to catch the bit that got by the dash. As time went by, the practicality was less as important as the appearance. In your case though James, it was simple and to the point, though likely to keep what was thrown up by other vehicles, rather than non-existant horses. Keep up the good work and do please keep us posted!

    Out of curiosity; many of the very early auto-motive vehicles, like yours, had a place to attach a pole and evener in case of the need for a tow. Does yours have this provision?

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Looking very good James, I can't wait to see it in person.

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  • BobGlasscock
    replied
    Getting better looking everyday. Just wonderful.

    I agree about covering the natural beauty of the wood, but it is truly a necessity for originality.

    When I first noticed the steel rear wheels, I thought it was a clever design for extra traction. Good luck on finding tires for the restoration.

    I'm looking forward to the next set of pics.

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  • avantilover
    replied
    I had another thought, why not contact Diamondback Tires and explain your requirements. Perhaps they could obtain a suitable solid black tire and then vulcanize white rubber onto it making it white, as they do when making a whitewall tire.

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  • avantilover
    replied
    The only white tires appear to be for scooters or bicycles. Suggest you try Bridgestone or Michelin as they are likely the two biggest manufacturers and see what they suggest.

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  • Bellingham Studenut
    replied
    July Update

    Electric Wagon Update:

    The "Dash Board" is completed (ever wonder where the name came from?).
    They were also useful when dashing through the snow in a Studebaker sleigh.




    Hand rails and supports were made.
    Currently looking for correct headlight and electric bell that mounts under the dashboard.



    The angled side boards were finished and body ready for paint.

    The chassis and wheels were red.



    Outside on frame dolly.
    Correct rear wheels are not on frame yet.



    Loading with fork lift.






    Off it goes, to get the body painted!



    They all had natural white rubber until later vehicles, when carbon black was added to the rubber.

    James

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  • studegary
    replied
    Originally posted by HAWK64 View Post
    That person was Carroll Studebaker himself after showing his two Studebaker Electrics at a prior SDC International Internatinal at Indianapolis in 1976.
    I remember Carroll Studebaker's electric cars. The electric car at the 1980 Gettysburg Meet was a different car that was owned by (IIRC) Zimmerman. Of course, someone could check their old TWs to verify.

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  • HAWK64
    replied
    Originally posted by studegary View Post
    C. Studebaker from Ohio used to bring electric cars to SDC meets, but I do not remember any electric commercial vehicles. Someone else brought an electric to the first (1980, IIRC) Gettysburg SDC International.
    You deserve a lot of credit for undertaking this project. What will propel it?
    That person was Carroll Studebaker himself after showing his two Studebaker Electrics at a prior SDC International Internatinal at Indianapolis in 1976.

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  • tomsamson
    replied
    What a fantastic project. I'd love to see some more pictures as the restoration continues!

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