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Studebaker Electric Wagon Restoration

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  • #76
    I searched for a more current thread on this project, and came up empty. Can somebody post a link if there is a newer update out there somewhere?
    ~Matt Connor
    '59 Lark 2-door

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    • #77
      Originally posted by Peanut View Post
      I searched for a more current thread on this project, and came up empty. Can somebody post a link if there is a newer update out there somewhere?
      I do not believe that there is a newer update or thread to be seen as yet.
      But I have it on good word that there is news coming very soon...





      StudeDave '57
      StudeDave '57
      US Navy (retired)

      3rd Generation Stude owner/driver
      SDC Member since 1985

      past President
      Whatcom County Chapter SDC
      San Diego Chapter SDC

      past Vice President
      San Diego Chapter SDC
      North Florida Chapter SDC

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      • #78
        I just found this thread. I'm blown away by the craftsmanship. Truely awe inspiring.
        Tom - Bradenton, FL

        1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
        1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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        • #79
          Originally posted by Swifster View Post
          I just found this thread. I'm blown away by the craftsmanship. Truely awe inspiring.
          Ditto, Swifster.
          sigpic
          Lark Parker --Just an innocent possum strolling down life's highway.

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          • #80
            This thread is in need of a MAJOR update!!!
            (those who were at this year's open house last month know what I mean...




            StudeDave '57
            StudeDave '57
            US Navy (retired)

            3rd Generation Stude owner/driver
            SDC Member since 1985

            past President
            Whatcom County Chapter SDC
            San Diego Chapter SDC

            past Vice President
            San Diego Chapter SDC
            North Florida Chapter SDC

            Comment


            • #81
              Rereading this thread reminds me that urethane forklift tires, are both solid, and white. They are the ones that are "non-marking" on concrete. Just a thought.

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              • #82
                I had not seen this thread before. This is really fascinating. Once again I am amazed at the variety of vehicles Studebaker made in the very early days. Both wagons and early electrics. It reminds me how sad it is they did not survive.
                Ed Sallia
                Dundee, OR

                Sol Lucet Omnibus

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                • #83
                  Wagon Wheels

                  Once the Wagon Wheels were done, we drove our 1963 Champ truck to pick them up in in eastern Washington.



                  We found another person taking a buggy to the Wheelwright in Montana. He was happy to drop the wheels off at Ron & DeAnn Hochhalter's shop in Sunnyside WA (where Avanti #1001 was being painted), so we picked them up there. At $540 one way delivery, it was easier to exercise the Champ truck since it has a factory 5speed Overdrive and does well on the highways.



                  We stopped to see Jerry and Joan before bringing the wheels over the Cascade mountains.
                  Yes, there is desert with lots of sunshine in Eastern Washington

                  James
                  Bells Studebaker Diner & Museum
                  Bellingham, WA.

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                  • #84
                    The Wagon Frame


                    Once the wagon frame was blasted and painted, we went to see how it looked and took a few parts to discuss finishing the frame, battery box, etc.








                    It's amazing what an old rusty frame can look like with new paint.
                    Jerry and his grandson Skyler hand painted the entire frame with 2 coats of paint.



                    The front right corner of frame was damaged at one time.
                    It was pushed down inward and we needed to decide if worthwhile trying to fix it.



                    The battery box has sliding battery trays with handles and stoppers, so it's easy to maintain the 4 batteries.
                    Since it requires 48 volts, (4) 12 volt modern batteries will be easy to get (just takes money).



                    Studebaker Craftsmen like Jerry are such a wealth of knowledge!
                    Learning any of the old school ways to do things are so valuable!




                    Notice how the high tech internal expanding shoes were adjustable.
                    The twisting of center piece expands the lower part of shoes outward and there are inserts that adjust from inside the shoes to adjust them.



                    I have such great appreciation for what both Studebaker and Jerry were able to do to this wagon!

                    James

                    Bells Studebaker Diner & Museum
                    Bellingham, WA.

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                    • #85
                      Thank you for the updates.
                      More important, thank you for undertaking this project.
                      The work looks excellent.
                      Wouldn't this vehicle be a truck rather than a "wagon" (since it is a self powered vehicle used for hauling things)?
                      Gary L.
                      Wappinger, NY

                      SDC member since 1968
                      Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Originally posted by studegary View Post
                        Wouldn't this vehicle be a truck rather than a "wagon" (since it is a self powered vehicle used for hauling things)?
                        Studebaker did call them 'electric wagons' in their advertising for them as per post #2 and the photo in #14 in this thread: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...light=electric

                        Of course the term 'station wagon' is still in use today, be it on a car chassis or a truck chassis.

                        Craig

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                        • #87
                          I am curious. From the early pictures, it appears this wagon got converted to being towed by either horses or a tractor, etc at some point and most of the electrical parts like the battery carriers, motor, etc were removed. I would assume locating such parts about near impossible and I see that you are fabricating a lot of them. Are you able to find old drawings from the museum or photos to go off or ??

                          What were the steel wheels on the rear from? Seems those were not correct. They sort of look like something from a farm implement.

                          Jeff in ND

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                          • #88
                            Trucks and Wagons.

                            The following ad mentions:
                            "The largest Truck order ever placed in this country was secured by Studebakers from Pierce & Co. of New York for 300 Electric Delivery Wagons,




                            Missing parts and repairs required research of both horsedrawn wagons and electrics of that time.
                            Visiting museums, archives, etc brought leads and info that allowed us to search and make needed items.




                            Ours is a model 25 which was the smallest of commercial vehicles and we have chassis and drive train information for it.



                            We al

                            James
                            Bells Studebaker Diner & Museum
                            Bellingham, WA.

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                            • #89
                              Installing Body & Frame


                              Before the body could be mounted on the frame, we needed to fix the frame that was bent in right front corner.

                              It may have rammed a loading dock, or something hard where it bends down and connects to the front of the leaf spring.
                              The bend on the right side caused the left side spring connection to be off sideways from where it connects in the rear.




                              Almost like an expert chiropractor, Jerry knew how it would require bending the front right up a certain amount, to bring the rear of the left spring sideways where it should line up!
                              A few measurements and off Jerry went to get some old school tools!
                              I had to question how a big pipe wrench attached to a chain going over a certain size block of wood, then attached to mid frame, was going to fix the other side leaf spring.





                              After applying a tight chain binder we applied heat until it started to glow red (like the new paint I just burnt off).







                              Then I noticed the chain tension getting looser!
                              So we measured it and found it went too far up, so Jerry gave it a couple good wraps with a hammer before it cooled off.





                              We measured again and still off some, but it was lunch time and Jerry said it may be different once cooled off, so we took a break.

                              Wouldn't you just know it, as luck has it, after lunch we measured again and it was RIGHT ON, so we bolted it up!
                              YES!



                              It was time to take the frame outside and get the body with the fork lift.





                              All the wood we started with made me realize how far the project has come.



                              Then I realized we were not finished. And how quickly things can happen if your not paying attention.







                              Down it went and once the body holes were lined up with the frame holes, we placed the mounting bolts.

                              It was so amazing that all bolt holes line up except 1 needing very slight ream of the drill (a true measure of Jerry's Craftsmanship!).





                              Thought we'd call it a night, but after a great dinner cooked by Joan, we caught our second wind and Jerry showed me how the battery covers would be mounted.

                              Having a mentor is priceless and brings new energy and support to a project like this.





                              Wow, it really looked different with body on frame and battery box covers!

                              Thanks Jerry and Joan!

                              James






                              Bells Studebaker Diner & Museum
                              Bellingham, WA.

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                              • #90
                                Bringing The Electric Wagon To Bellingham


                                After getting the wagon body mounted on its frame, it was ready to be loaded on the car trailer.

                                Gordon Bueling came over to Jerry's shop to help load it.
                                We soon found out the added weight of the body on the rolling frame stand cracked the base board when trying to lift it.







                                Gordon added extra bracing to the bottom and we were able to use the fork lift.







                                Once it was lined up, I was able to back the trailer up enough to get the front on without hitting the fork lift wheels.







                                Then Jerry was able to lift the back and push it on the trailer.






                                We mounted the stand to trailer with more wood screwed to the trailer so the weight wasn't on the small stand wheels and strapped the wagon down.





                                Once finished, we were on a roll !!! (click to see video).





                                When was the last time anyone has seen a Studebaker Electric Truck being pulled by a 1958 Studebaker Truck?





                                We made a stop in Wenatche to pick up a Studebaker Boat (company owners were distant relatives)
                                .





                                We made the trip over the Cascade Mountains to Bellingham without a charge, or any problems, but got lots of looks.






                                Once home, the wagon couldn't be unloaded without adding the wheels, then removing the stand and rolling it off.









                                Dave Gahlbeck came over the next day and we got the remaining wheels on and the wagon off the car trailer. Thanks Dave!









                                The electric wagon looks different again with the wheels on it!
                                The wheels still need to be painted and the metal hubs and brake drums get painted same red as frame.






                                Bell's Studebaker Diner & Museum 2014 Annual Open House had 153 people driving their Studebaker's to Bellingham, so Jerry and Joan were able to be with the electric wagon and explain all the interesting things about it!

                                It got a lot of attention and had a great time!











                                It still has things to finish, but it's a great example of what Studebaker did between manufacturing horse drawn vehicles and gasoline vehicles.

                                Thanks again Jerry!

                                James
                                Bells Studebaker Diner & Museum
                                Bellingham, WA.

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