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Studebaker Electric Wagon Restoration

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  • Commander Eddie
    replied
    I had not seen this thread before. This is really fascinating. Once again I am amazed at the variety of vehicles Studebaker made in the very early days. Both wagons and early electrics. It reminds me how sad it is they did not survive.

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  • Chucks Stude
    replied
    Rereading this thread reminds me that urethane forklift tires, are both solid, and white. They are the ones that are "non-marking" on concrete. Just a thought.

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  • StudeDave57
    replied
    This thread is in need of a MAJOR update!!!
    (those who were at this year's open house last month know what I mean...




    StudeDave '57

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  • Lark Parker
    replied
    Originally posted by Swifster View Post
    I just found this thread. I'm blown away by the craftsmanship. Truely awe inspiring.
    Ditto, Swifster.

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  • Swifster
    replied
    I just found this thread. I'm blown away by the craftsmanship. Truely awe inspiring.

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeDave57
    replied
    Originally posted by Peanut View Post
    I searched for a more current thread on this project, and came up empty. Can somebody post a link if there is a newer update out there somewhere?
    I do not believe that there is a newer update or thread to be seen as yet.
    But I have it on good word that there is news coming very soon...





    StudeDave '57

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  • Peanut
    replied
    I searched for a more current thread on this project, and came up empty. Can somebody post a link if there is a newer update out there somewhere?

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  • rockne10
    replied
    Scott,
    Those beautiful smooth finishes on the electric coaches, coupes and landaus were typical for the electric cars. Even the leather fenders were tight enough to appear as steel. I suspect a delivery wagon did not require that mirror finish.

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  • Scott
    replied
    Not to be picky, but wouldn't the original finish have been gloss black that's smooth with no grain showing at all? I thought a smooth, polished gloss finish was the mark of high standards of workmanship. Just wondering.

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  • Bellingham Studenut
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    That is just amazing James, to say Jerry is a Master Craftsman does not begin to describe a man of that talent.
    It is going to look wonderful and work really well also.
    Yes and Stephanie is working on the lamps with Mike Yeakel who has one of the best early model vehicle collections in Bellingham.
    You may have seen his 2 cylinder Caddilac, or others.
    David Engle is working on the wheels.

    James

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    That is just amazing James, to say Jerry is a Master Craftsman does not begin to describe a man of that talent.
    It is going to look wonderful and work really well also.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bellingham Studenut
    replied
    Originally posted by Roscomacaw View Post
    Hats off to all involved with this project. I LOVE your perseverence in searching for white rubber tyres! But the whole thing has been great to watch as it comes along. Where the heck did you scare up that horn and light?
    It's actually not a horn, but is the other side lamp.

    They were high-tech, with electric side lamps and an electric bell with foot switch.



    One of the lamps had a crushed top and were missing the bottom round peice.




    The top peice has been straightened and brass polished, but they require full dismantle and restoration.






    Unfortunately the wagon body doesn't look as good having paint cover all that nice woodwork on the body, but were trying to keep original.





    Originally they came with a rod that acted as a key to shut off power and prevented theft.
    You would insert it under the seat and switch it on.
    The final plate will be brass and the key will have a round ball on it.



    Jerry is a Master Craftsman and he made the entire mechanism from scratch along with the adjustable rachet power shift unit he made.





    The tiller steering handle will be made out of this brass stock.



    The frame and mechanical's have more to do, but you can see where the battery trays will be under the frame.






    James

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Hats off to all involved with this project. I LOVE your perseverence in searching for white rubber tyres! But the whole thing has been great to watch as it comes along. Where the heck did you scare up that horn and light?

    Leave a comment:


  • jclary
    replied
    I am absolutely fascinated by the wheel work. I am also pleased to know there is a "wheelwright" business still available and that the manufacturing art is not lost. While in Indiana, I attempted to visit an Amish wagon builder, but when I got to his shop, he was closed.

    How about the pictures showing the craftsman using those lock ring pliers and a tiny shirt pocket screwdriver while servicing the bearings? It shows the respect, craftsmanship, dedication, and delicacy required to restore this vintage machinery. Once the job is completed, what will be the process for controlling humidity to protect these wheels from the swelling and contracting cycles wood goes through? Also, will the vehicle be supported to keep the rubber tires off the ground to prevent acquiring a "set" (or flat spotting) from setting long periods of time? My '55 truck bounces down the road for a few miles every time I drive it after leaving it setting for a few days. After the tires warm up, they return to their "roundness," but it is a pretty rough ride for the first few miles. On a large heavy vehicle like this, with those solid rubber tires, I'm thinking that "flat-spotting" could be permanent.

    Great work. Keep the updates coming.

    Leave a comment:


  • avantilover
    replied
    Well done James and all.

    Leave a comment:

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