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  • fender vents...

    i've always held the belief that Ford "stole" the fender vents that are present on the '56 and '57 T-Birds (but not the '55) from Studebaker...

    does anyone know if the rectangular front fender vents were "originally" Stude or not?
    ('57 Packards also had them)...

  • #2
    WEll I think that they were on Studebakers first. My 1949 Champion has them and I know the 1947's had them. Not sure how far back. Someone will chime in and fill in the rest of the Story.
    Mabel 1949 Champion
    Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
    Gus 1958 Transtar
    The Prez 1955 President State
    Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
    Daisy 1954 Regal Commander Starlight Coupe
    Fresno,Ca

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    • #3
      I saw them on the '46 Champion Skyway coupe...
      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

      Jeff


      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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      • #4
        the "earliest" i'm finding 'pictorially' is a '29 Packard (though not "one" per fender, but i was thinking more along the lines of when the "idea" for the hinged vent surfaced)...

        also seen on a '31 Ford...

        can anyone find a hinged rectangular vent prior to '29?



        i'm starting to think these were a PACKARD "idea" and Studebaker "acquired" it when they merged with Packard...

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        • #5
          Ford had them in early 1928.
          Klif
          55 Speedster/Street Machine
          63 Avanti R2
          64 Convertible R1

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Stude-Dude View Post
            i'm starting to think these were a PACKARD "idea" and Studebaker "acquired" it when they merged with Packard...
            Except for one minor detail- Studebaker had them years before the 'merger'!!!
            She Anne's (or Jeff's) post above...
            StudeDave '57
            US Navy (retired)

            3rd Generation Stude owner/driver
            SDC Member since 1985

            past President
            Whatcom County Chapter SDC
            San Diego Chapter SDC

            past Vice President
            San Diego Chapter SDC
            North Florida Chapter SDC

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            • #7
              Packard acquired Studebaker in '54, the '29 Packard is WAY before '54...

              as for the '28 Ford mentioned, i cannot find any pictures of a '28 Ford with a hinged rectangular air vent, just the normal "perforated vents" widely used back in the day...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Stude-Dude View Post
                i'm starting to think these were a PACKARD "idea" and Studebaker "acquired" it when they merged with Packard...
                Originally posted by Stude-Dude View Post
                Packard acquired Studebaker in '54, the '29 Packard is WAY before '54...
                Yes, the '29 is way before '54, but we know they didn't get it from the merger because it's clear that Studebaker was using them prior to that. So which is it? You can't have it both ways dude...



                StudeDave '57
                StudeDave '57
                US Navy (retired)

                3rd Generation Stude owner/driver
                SDC Member since 1985

                past President
                Whatcom County Chapter SDC
                San Diego Chapter SDC

                past Vice President
                San Diego Chapter SDC
                North Florida Chapter SDC

                Comment


                • #9
                  Stud-Dude
                  There is a good photo of the 1928 Ford vents in ( The Model A Ford " As Henery built it.) page106.
                  Klif
                  55 Speedster/Street Machine
                  63 Avanti R2
                  64 Convertible R1

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by StudeDave57 View Post
                    Yes, the '29 is way before '54, but we know they didn't get it from the merger because it's clear that Studebaker was using them prior to that. So which is it? You can't have it both ways dude...



                    StudeDave '57
                    ah, guess i was thinking "stude is 'allowed' to use packard design ideas, they are one-in-the-same"...

                    BUT one-in-the-same would not have been the case in '29...
                    so yeah, oops, lol...

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                    • #11
                      Hi

                      Cowl vents, both side and top, are found on a great variety of pre WWII cars beginning when the body form developed into a more enveloping layout in the WWI period. Their purpose was relief from engine heat which radiated into the driver's compartment through the uninsulated firewall. As much as it could become uncomfortably hot in the front of an open touring in the summer, with the advent of the ubiquitous closed sedan body, cowl vents became an imperative.

                      By the late '40's many makes ducted air through from the front grille to the passenger compartment. Otherwise the cowl top vent seems to have been the preferred location.

                      Steve

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Stude-Dude View Post
                        i've always held the belief that Ford "stole" the fender vents that are present on the '56 and '57 T-Birds (but not the '55) from Studebaker...

                        does anyone know if the rectangular front fender vents were "originally" Stude or not?
                        ('57 Packards also had them)...
                        The Jaguar XK120 had them as well starting about 1951. I would suspect it would have been more of an inspiration for Ford to use them on the Thunderbird since both were two-seat sports cars.



                        Craig
                        Last edited by 8E45E; 02-04-2011, 07:27 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 8E45E View Post
                          The Jaguar XK120 had them as well starting about 1951. I would suspect it would have been more of an inspiration for Ford to use them on the Thunderbird since both were two-seat sports cars.

                          Craig
                          You beat me to it...
                          I think Ford was looking to mimic the Jag, which was THE classy sports car at the time.
                          But since the 55s didn't have them, it was also a case of doing something about cockpit heat without redesigning the car and expensive retooling.
                          As far a Studes using them...perhaps a cheap, effective solution to a problem? Probably why the Jag had them in the first place. Neither outfit had much in terms of R&D budgets, so for all three companies, simple was better.
                          Last edited by JBOYLE; 02-04-2011, 08:28 AM.
                          63 Avanti R1 2788
                          1914 Stutz Bearcat
                          (George Barris replica)

                          Washington State

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                          • #14
                            Crosley had them in 1930's 40's-50;s, Studebaker started with the 1941.

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