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Unearthed a commander deck lid

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  • Unearthed a commander deck lid

    I literally was walking in the woods behind my Virginia home and came across a deck lid from a mid 50s studebaker commander half buried. Amazingly, it doesn't have much rust and might make a good little restoration piece. The chrome around the key hole is a little pitted but still in passable condition. There is some rust on the inside around the hinge mounting areas so that would need some new metal but the skin is really nice. Make an offer and come pick it up. My 7yr old now thinks we have buried treasure and wants to go hiking out there every day! Rob 804-363-8313

  • #2
    I was working on a 1920 Model T about 35 years ago in LA. The guy wanted a rear spare tire mount. finally located one in SF, had it shipped to him in LA. 2 weeks later he was walking his dog in the hills right behind his home, yep, he found a complete frame for a model T, and it had the rear spare tire carrier! 150 yards from his back door!

    Jim
    "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

    We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


    Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

    As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
    their Memorials!

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    • #3
      buried treasure

      I ignored an old board, half submerged & bound with roots many times, but one time I thought I saw a rusty bolt sticking up from it, so I grabbed a shovel & excavated it. On the other side, bolted to the back of the board, was a set of pumps from a 1916 Stanley. They cleaned up very nicely with a good blasting with sugar sand, and were quickly turned into ca$h.
      Barry'd in Studes

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      • #4
        I've got a 1800's farm house half on my property and I'm waiting to unearth some civil war era stuff but nothing yet. I took a metal detector out there and almost blew my ears off. I guess we forget that people would just toss cans out the window back in the day or bury them in a shallow hole near the house. I've found my share of rusty cans and old bottles. Anyway, is this deck lid worth anything? What's the best resource to make sure a Studebaker lover get this gem?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by robertsmau View Post
          I literally was walking in the woods behind my Virginia home and came across a deck lid from a mid 50s studebaker commander half buried. Amazingly, it doesn't have much rust and might make a good little restoration piece. The chrome around the key hole is a little pitted but still in passable condition. There is some rust on the inside around the hinge mounting areas so that would need some new metal but the skin is really nice. Make an offer and come pick it up. My 7yr old now thinks we have buried treasure and wants to go hiking out there every day! Rob 804-363-8313
          Mid 50s is a bit broad to make an evaluation. Also body style makes a difference. Got any pictures?
          "In the heart of Arkansas."
          Searcy, Arkansas
          1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
          1952 2R pickup

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          • #6
            In 1969 I bought a 1962 beater Daytona for its engine to rebuild and put in my 1964 Commander. I pulled the engine, junked the Daytona and rebuilt the 289. The engine I pulled from my Commander I buried, complete, at the corner post of my property, near the barn. Someday someone will find it and wonder…………….?

            Dick
            Mountain Home, AR
            http://www.livingintheozarks.com/studebaker2.htm

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            • #7
              A friend & I were walking in fields near his Tilsonburg Ontario home when we came upon a small depression that had been used as a farm dump site,about half burried was a 59-60 Lark.It was the base model 6cyl. & a 4 door so it wasn't worth digging it out.

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              • #8
                I love stories like these. I used to live on a farm for about 5 years and took up metal detecting. On the farm was the site of an old farm house that had burned down. Near it I thought I might have found a burried car. I started digging and found a big piece of sheet metal that looked like the fender of a '37 stude. WRONG!!! It turned out to be the house trash pile under the old oak tree! It was worth it though. It turned out to be the mother load of scrap copper wire, about 50 bundles of it. And a few pieces of scrap sheet metal. I also knew a guy once who found a complete model T ford while mushroom hunting. Where am I when people find these things?!
                Chris Dresbach

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                • #9
                  buried treasure? buried, yes - treasure? well......

                  Originally posted by kmul221 View Post
                  A friend & I were walking in fields near his Tilsonburg Ontario home when we came upon a small depression that had been used as a farm dump site,about half burried was a 59-60 Lark.It was the base model 6cyl. & a 4 door so it wasn't worth digging it out.
                  Courtesy of The H.A.M.B.












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                  • #10
                    It casts a shadow, therefor it's resorable, right?
                    Chris Dresbach

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Chris_Dresbach View Post
                      It casts a shadow, therefor it's resorable, right?
                      oh it's reasonable...I used to store some of my cars at my friend's Dad's plumbing shop yard. One day his father got tired of looking at all the 'junk', took the backhoe, dug a huge hole, placed all the cars side-by-side, and buried them. Gone was my '72 Datsun 2 door ice-racing car, my totalled 69 Chevelle Malibu, my jointly owned 67 Austin Mini, a 61 or 62 Impala 4 door, a 52 or 53 Mercury 4door, and a 54 chevy truck. I always wondered if they were 'discovered' when the land was sold for a housing develpment. Double wondered what shape the brand new Firestone winter tires would have been that were stored in the trunk of the Mini. They were buried around 1977, and the housing development went is sometime in the mid 90's. The land was situated north of Edmonton Speedway, and rumour has it that his Dad also buried some old junk stock cars from the 50's that used to race at the track...I never did see these cars. Regarding this buried GMC...good thing it wasn't a Coupe Express. Junior
                      sigpic
                      1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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