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What were the Studebaker strike dates in 1963?

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  • What were the Studebaker strike dates in 1963?

    My 62 GT Hawk was built on February 14, 1962 according to the Production Order. How soon after the strike date was that?

    Peter Bishop
    Director,
    Northeast Zone

  • #2
    Hi, Peter: I'm not sure why this topic is in the Technical section, but I'll give it a shot. (I think you mean 1962 in your topic's title, not 1963, but I can't change that.)

    This is not the sort of informatiion you find in the rah-rah-rah in-house organ Studebaker News, but there are references in several early-1962 issues of Business Week magazine.

    Be sure to note the cover dates of each issue as you read these citations.

    From the January 6 edition, in a story entitled, "UAW Strikes S-P":

    "UAW's Local 5 in South Bend called its 6,500 workers off jobs at midnight Monday. The union originally threatened a walkout January 7, after a meeting at which workers were expected to reject company terms for a new three-year contract.

    Union officials predicted on Tuesday that the strike would continue through the week unless Studebaker-Packard modified its offer. Management showed no inclination to give ground. Mediators reported glumly that the parties were 'maintaining hard positions.'

    The terms offered by the company still will go to a vote at a mass meeting Sunday, January 7. Ray Berndt, UAW Regional Director and Chief Negotiator, will recommend their rejection. He contends that the 'package' proposed by Studebaker-Packard could mean a net loss of one cent an hour for employees through 1964."


    Then, in the January 15 edition, from an article entitled, "Showdown at South Bend:"

    "With Studebaker already in perilous financial straits, and both sides prepared for a strike 'of long duration,' there was only one consolation: S-P dealers have stockpiled a backlog of about 20,000 cars, enough for about 70 days."

    Finally, an article in the February 17 Business Week concludes, in an article entitled, "Strong Medicine for Revival":

    "Settlement of the 40-day strike, longest and most painful in Studebaker's history, illustrates Egbert's sometimes-unorthodox methods. He had carefully calculated just how long S-P could take the strike in stride. Then he moved quickly for a meeting with UAW President Walter Reuther and Labor Sectretary Arthur J. Goldberg. The contract, ratified by workers last Sunday, boosts costs much less than did the new General Motors Corp. pact."

    All I can say is, it's a good thing those UAW workers didn't compromise in January 1962 and agree to any horrendous one cent per hour pay cut spread out over 36 months! Damn straight: Better they have no job at all in 23 months!

    Why does Pogo's famous "we have met the enemy and he is us" quote come to mind so often when studying history? <GGG> BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 11-25-2010, 04:38 PM.
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Bob. My production order lists December 22, 1961 as the date the order was written with an anticipated shipping date of January 5, 1962. The final assembly date, however, is February 14, 1962 probably due to the strike. According to the Manufacturers Statement of Origin the GT Hawk was received at Snuffy SMith Motor Company, Dallas, Texas on March 5, 1962 and sold on March 27, 1962. The car was originally slated for delivery to Rochester, New York but was reassigned to Dallas, Texas. So if the contract was ratified on Sunday, March 11, 1962 it took 3 days to reach final assembly. What is interesting is the quality control that went on relative to my car as documented by the original owers family. It seems that when the car was brought in for "after-the-sale" service, a Studebaker rep was at the dealership and advised the owner that the poor lead work on both sail panels should be reworked by Studebaker. The original owner decline and to this day I can point to that area of the car as being original. Kind of like paint runs but it is only original once!

      Peter Bishop
      Director,
      Northeast Zone

      Comment


      • #4
        You're welcome, Peter. Say, didn't you mean to say they ratified the contract on Sunday, February 11, 1962, rather than March 11? (An important day in my life, for sure: Sunday, February 11, 1962, was my coveted 16th birthday! 'Off to the license branch the next week to take the competency test in the family's new, 1962 Mercury Monterey 4-door and secure my Drivers License! Yippee!) BP
        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

        Ayn Rand:
        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
          All I can say is, it's a good thing those UAW workers didn't compromise in January 1962 and agree to any horrendous one cent per hour pay cut spread out over 36 months! Damn straight: Better they have no job at all in 23 months!
          BP
          Greedy unions....I don't understand employees being so unwilling to sacrifice a little for their employer when the employer is obviously having a tough time staying afloat. I also don't understand government employees demanding pay raises during tough economic times. I guess many of us Americans are greedy and spoiled and that's why China is having it's way with us.
          Today I give thanks for having a job with a small locally owned company that pays a living wage, pays for my health insurance, gives me paid vacation time and gives me a good working environnment so that I can do my job comfortably. I appreciate the 15 pound frozen turkey they recently gave me too!
          sigpic
          In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

          Comment


          • #6
            It's a sickness, Brent. Unions started out as protection to workers to assure fair treatment and safe working conditions. They have mutated into an entity whose main purpose is to pit workers against the very source of, and reason for, their existence! So pervasive is the sickness that the workers will follow this suicidal path right into the ground, including proudly destroying their company or driving it overseas, and high-fiving each other over making themselves unemployed- all in the name of "standing together". Sickness.

            I come from a big pro-union family, and have seen this occur too many times. Best latest example is what they did to the Magna plant, formerly New Process Gear plant, here in Syracuse NY. The last big factory in our area, formerly 11,000 jobs, is closing down next year- completely- because the workers refused to come to realistic terms with the company. So several of my own family members are now unemployed, and it's "all the company's fault".

            Favorite quote from a former NPG worker: "Eighteen bucks an hour plus benefits?? That's not even worth getting out of bed for!"

            As I said- sickness.
            Proud NON-CASO

            I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

            If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

            GOD BLESS AMERICA

            Ephesians 6:10-17
            Romans 15:13
            Deuteronomy 31:6
            Proverbs 28:1

            Illegitimi non carborundum

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Milaca View Post
              I also don't understand government employees demanding pay raises during tough economic times.
              But here they CAN be fired for eating a cookie!

              http://www.calgaryherald.com/busines...169/story.html

              Craig

              Comment


              • #8
                A couple of years ago I purchased at the South Bend spring swap meet a booklet (for a buck!) titled "Agreement between Studebaker-Packard Corporation and the UAW-AFL-CIO" dated February 7, 1962. If I knew how, I'd attach an image.

                I assume that's the date that an agreement was reached. Maybe somebody knows the exact date that production resumed.

                My '62 Hawk was presumably held up by the strike as well. My production order was written on 12-28-61, with a "date to ship" of 1-11-21. It's final assembly date wasn't until 2-16-62. My car was ordered by and built for Alfred Edwards of Sacramento (according to the dash plaque). I'll bet Alfred wasn't too happy about the strike either.

                ~Tim

                '62 Hawk
                '64 Commander

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have a letter written by Cliff MacMillan that deals with the strike and the imfamous Turtle story... Appearently, during the strike management wanted to demonstrate the Turtle to military generals to hopefully gain a production contract. They couldn't just take the Turtle out of the engineering building in braud sight because the picketers would go to extremes to keep the Turtle in the plant. Egbert himself told MacMillan and some other engineers with the project to "get it out in any way possible". Long story short, they snuck it out on the back of a flatbed truck in the middle of the night all without being seen! Shortly after this however, the strike was ended and production continued, except for the Turtle. It was hidden in the Marycrest building and eventually was brought back to the engineering building. You know the rest of the story... This was all in a letter to Egbert by MacMillan called "Midnight Adventure" and is also in the SNM Archives.
                  Chris Dresbach

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                    >>>Today I give thanks for having a job with a small locally owned company that pays a living wage, pays for my health insurance, gives me paid vacation time and gives me a good working environnment so that I can do my job comfortably.<<<
                    WOW ...what fresh new ideas!!!

                    Locally owned company ...pays a living wage ...pays for health insurance ...paid vacation ...good working environment ...hey, were you just reading out of the same booklet I was

                    Here is the one I was reading


                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Welcome View Post
                      WOW ...what fresh new ideas!!!

                      [COLOR="blue"]Locally owned company ...pays a living wage ...pays for health insurance ...paid vacation ...good working environment ...hey, were you just reading out of the same booklet I was
                      Nice Studebaker momento you have there Jim, but no, I've never read it. My story differs from the Studebaker employees of that time in that I've never striked or even asked for a raise. Maybe I just like being taken advantage of?
                      sigpic
                      In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                        Nice Studebaker momento you have there Jim, but no, I've never read it. My story differs from the Studebaker employees of that time in that I've never striked or even asked for a raise. Maybe I just like being taken advantage of?
                        Proud NON-CASO

                        I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                        If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                        GOD BLESS AMERICA

                        Ephesians 6:10-17
                        Romans 15:13
                        Deuteronomy 31:6
                        Proverbs 28:1

                        Illegitimi non carborundum

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                          Nice Studebaker momento you have there Jim, but no, I've never read it. <<<
                          Thanks, it was my Father's, he earned it the old fashion way!

                          Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                          >>>Maybe I just like being taken advantage of? <<<
                          Maybe!?!?

                          Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                          <<< My story differs from the Studebaker employees of that time in that I've never striked or even asked for a raise.<<<


                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sorry Jim if I offended you in any way. I can see where you are coming from as this topic hits close to home being that you had family that worked there. I mean no disrespect to you or your family, its just that the unions as a whole have given themselves a bad name to those of us that work non-union jobs (meaning that we earn lower wages, seldom get wage increases and many of us don't have a pension or retirement fund of any kind). It may be best if we shake hands and put this discussion to bed. I'd insert a hand-shaking emoticon here, but I dont know how to.
                            With that said, I appreciate your Studebaker knowledge as it is nice having a forum contributor with ties to the actual Studebaker company.
                            sigpic
                            In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Milaca View Post
                              Sorry Jim if I offended you in any way. I can see where you are coming from as this topic hits close to home being that you had family that worked there. I mean no disrespect to you or your family, its just that the unions as a whole have given themselves a bad name to those of us that work non-union jobs (meaning that we earn lower wages, seldom get wage increases and many of us don't have a pension or retirement fund of any kind). It may be best if we shake hands and put this discussion to bed. I'd insert a hand-shaking emoticon here, but I dont know how to.
                              With that said, I appreciate your Studebaker knowledge as it is nice having a forum contributor with ties to the actual Studebaker company.
                              Absolutely no offense of any kind taken.

                              Look up definitions for the word "FORUM" ...and they all apply to what we are doing here. And what better place to have "discussions" about Studebaker than the Studebaker Drivers Club FORUM


                              I don't play favorites with the Studebaker Management or the Union; "I just calls 'em likes I sees 'em!!!"
                              Last edited by Welcome; 11-27-2010, 04:54 AM.

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