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The modern era is not so modern:-(

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  • The modern era is not so modern:-(

    So there I was in the shop...........I asked for the brake hone...........brake hone?..........have not used one in ten years........we buy only new no rebuilding...........so we utilzed some 600 grit cloth and prayed............well so far no leaks..........this shop also has no pressure lube gun (50 lb pail) because my Studebaker is the only car that asks for a lube job.........."You see Felix, your old POS is the only car that has zerks.........." :-(

  • #2
    Your car was built so it would have the option of lasting if serviced properly. In modern times we are expected to throw everything away when a component goes out. It is not so much a story of the car that is outdated, but the mindset that things can and should be repaired that is antiquated. Sad really.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by 5859 View Post
      Your car was built so it would have the option of lasting if serviced properly. In modern times we are expected to throw everything away when a component goes out. It is not so much a story of the car that is outdated, but the mindset that things can and should be repaired that is antiquated. Sad really.
      I would have to disagree on this. The new permanently sealed suspension joints are far superior to those of the Studebaker era. I once worked as an oil/lube changer back in the 60s, so I saw a LOT of zerk fittings. Even with regular re-lube, the old joints were prone to collecting water and dirt. In the winter, when re-lubed the first thing that typically squirted out of a tie rod end was salt water. The rubber boots soon deteriorated and the joint would collect dirt that stuck to the grease and worked into the joint.

      Even with the best of care, the old joints wore out in a few years. By comparison, my 11 year old beater has all of its original sealed joints still like new.
      Jim Bradley
      Lake Monticello, VA
      '78 Avanti II
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Was it a 'modern era' shop?
        They seem to be only interested in turn rates on consumable commodity replacement items.
        How fast can you get it in, slap on the pads or shoes, replace the sender, and get it out.
        No real diagnostics, no rebuilding of components. Just replace and move on.
        But, as far as rebuilding components goes......
        If you look real hard at the current parts aftermarket, there are too many companies making too much product for the existing repair market.
        That's good for the consumer, because it means more competition, and lower prices.
        What's bad is that it means lower margins for those component manufacturers, and ultimately for the jobber(s) and repair shops.
        So they have to look at their own internal margins to 'run lean' to preserve profits to stay in business.
        That's where little things like rebuilding tool investment, or technician training to rebuild items goes out the front bay door.
        Cheaper to replace the item than rebuild it.
        And the manufacturer offering (sku's) shrinks in marginal applications (ie: Studebaker's).
        So...parts availability, and trained tech's wither.
        That's what drives the 'old school' repair shops, and to some extent, the hobbyist.
        It goes back to the old attitude we cherish here... "I'd rather fix than switch"
        That involves some extra effort.
        It is interesting to see who actually puts out that 'extra effort' in the aftermarket parts and service world.
        When one does find a place that cares, and puts out that effort... Lock 'em in and make sure to tip 'em
        Jeff

        Originally posted by Felix Benet View Post
        So there I was in the shop...........I asked for the brake hone...........brake hone?..........have not used one in ten years........we buy only new no rebuilding...........so we utilzed some 600 grit cloth and prayed............well so far no leaks..........this shop also has no pressure lube gun (50 lb pail) because my Studebaker is the only car that asks for a lube job.........."You see Felix, your old POS is the only car that has zerks.........." :-(
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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        • #5
          It is a modern shop........but why should they keep tools they will never utilize...this is what they said.......they do all modern computer controlled autos..but even the old big three cars that come in....they purchase all new already re-built parts...they do not purchase re-buid kits...like for wheel cyls and or master cyl's
          Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
          Was it a 'modern era' shop?
          They seem to be only interested in turn rates on consumable commodity replacement items.
          How fast can you get it in, slap on the pads or shoes, replace the sender, and get it out.
          No real diagnostics, no rebuilding of components. Just replace and move on.
          But, as far as rebuilding components goes......
          If you look real hard at the current parts aftermarket, there are too many companies making too much product for the existing repair market.
          That's good for the consumer, because it means more competition, and lower prices.
          What's bad is that it means lower margins for those component manufacturers, and ultimately for the jobber(s) and repair shops.
          So they have to look at their own internal margins to 'run lean' to preserve profits to stay in business.
          That's where little things like rebuilding tool investment, or technician training to rebuild items goes out the front bay door.
          Cheaper to replace the item than rebuild it.
          And the manufacturer offering (sku's) shrinks in marginal applications (ie: Studebaker's).
          So...parts availability, and trained tech's wither.
          That's what drives the 'old school' repair shops, and to some extent, the hobbyist.
          It goes back to the old attitude we cherish here... "I'd rather fix than switch"
          That involves some extra effort.
          It is interesting to see who actually puts out that 'extra effort' in the aftermarket parts and service world.
          When one does find a place that cares, and puts out that effort... Lock 'em in and make sure to tip 'em
          Jeff

          Comment


          • #6
            Jeff has hit in on the nose again. Where I work we charge extra if a vehicle needs to be greased. Quick slam bam thank you mam type of service. When parts are replaced, if not in our stock (which is a joke) the markup is at least double of cost, but when it comes to paying those who work there, commission is minimal. For example, a simple oil change & air filter replacement total cost $30 & change gives me a commission of 88 cents. Yeah I'm really getting rich on that coupled with the 6 dollars an hour salary! So what do we expect in these "modern" times. As time goes by we get less & less to pay more & more to contribute to a conglomerate's bottom line so the top management get fed until they either declare bankrupsy or sell the company off to another who then has to raise prices & deliver less in order to pay for the overblown price they paid and so on....................
            59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
            60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
            61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
            62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
            62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
            62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
            63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
            63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
            64 Zip Van
            66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
            66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Rerun View Post
              I would have to disagree on this. The new permanently sealed suspension joints are far superior to those of the Studebaker era. I once worked as an oil/lube changer back in the 60s, so I saw a LOT of zerk fittings. Even with regular re-lube, the old joints were prone to collecting water and dirt. In the winter, when re-lubed the first thing that typically squirted out of a tie rod end was salt water. The rubber boots soon deteriorated and the joint would collect dirt that stuck to the grease and worked into the joint.

              Even with the best of care, the old joints wore out in a few years. By comparison, my 11 year old beater has all of its original sealed joints still like new.
              You miss my point or possibly misunderstand. Cars of the Studebaker era are a lot easier to maintain and work on than modern cars, at least for me they are, other people may have problems with them, that coupled with the price of replacment components means, at least in my opinion, they will last longer with regular service, that is not to say they don't wear out, but when components do they can easily be replaced rather than throwing the whole thing away. An example, though not a joint, against sealed moving parts would be the bearings in my Simplicity tractor mowing deck. They are sealed and non greasable. They are also as loud as can be. Greasable bearings on the other hand run smoothly and quietly even though they are prone to water and dirt entering the bearing. I also don't agree that old joints wear out in a couple of years with proper care due to the high number of old cars I have owned that have not needed joint replacement verses the low number that have. It could have to do with my being located in CA where we do not have to worry about salt water.

              Comment


              • #8
                Just this afternoon I went in to town to have a pair of tapered axle brake drums resurfaced. The 1st shop sold their equipment, the 2nd said they had the machine but don't surface drums anymore and the 3rd shop does drums but the machinist wasn't sure what tapered axles were and then found that their mandrel was too large in diameter to fit the drum. However the 4th shop had an older machine and after approx. 1/2 hour locating the mandrel pieces ("haven't done a drum like that in 40 years") the drums were resurfaced - $50 plus tax, a bargain considering the time it took. I suspect I was lucky finding a shop that can do it.

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