Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Studebaker: Ever any "Recalls"

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by marcbr4 View Post
    This is very interesting! Thank you 556063.
    No problem. I wish the younger guys could have met some of the people now gone. I wish I'd have recorded everything over the years. There may be a tape/CD out there of the Employee's Discussion at the 2002 Meet? The discussions were numerous and riveting.

    I think Studebaker and it's employees in the era Studebaker did business would have taken offense to the idea that any third party, government or not, would have to serve as a watchdog over customer relations and satisfaction. That concept just didn't exist in those days. People were more self sufficient and business could be done on a handshake in many cases. People didn't run for cover behind their lawyers back then. Any story of contact with the Studebaker factory I've ever seen has told of a warm, receptive company reply, often offering a more than acceptable accomodation. By the 60's, they may have been less giving, but it seems they "Always gave more than they promised". In today's wacked out hyper sensitive business jargon, that would be called living up to your "Mission Statement".

    Not only did economies of scale from competitors hurt Studebaker, but the intensifying business climate by 1965 had made their way of doing business old fashioned and outdated. There probably wasn't a company Studebaker's size where more attention was given to a customer's request or needs. All the employees I've ever known were honest, down to earth people that wanted others to be treated the same way. No other manufacturer probably ever did as many "one off" production orders to fill a customer request. And car buyers were different then. No customer would dream of bringing back a five year old car to try to get warranty repairs.

    The NHTSA is looking into recalling Jeep Grand Cherokees as far back as 1993 this week. That's like recalling a 1946 Studebaker in 1963. That would have been too outrageous to comprehend back in the day,

    Comment


    • #17
      Two or three Studebaker history books and maybe even non-Studebaker books mention the too sharp notch cut for the con rod bolt heads in one new version of the six cylinder engine. When rods started breaking from resulting fatigue cracks a proper radius was used.

      Dan T

      Comment


      • #18
        The Australian assembled Larks and Cruisers from 63 to 65 appeared to have no paint or rust protection inside the doors-just bare metal.I've pulled many a door apart off these cars over the years and found... nothing...unless I was just unlucky.It was quite common to find the bottom six to eight inches of the doors completely rusted through as well as the lower inner door frame.I bought a couple of sets of 63-4 doors whilst in the U.S. recently.They were in quite good shape and had paint and proofing inside them.
        Quality control??
        A.C.Moisley

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Chantony View Post
          The Australian assembled Larks and Cruisers from 63 to 65 appeared to have no paint or rust protection inside the doors-just bare metal.I've pulled many a door apart off these cars over the years and found... nothing...unless I was just unlucky.It was quite common to find the bottom six to eight inches of the doors completely rusted through as well as the lower inner door frame.I bought a couple of sets of 63-4 doors whilst in the U.S. recently.They were in quite good shape and had paint and proofing inside them.
          Quality control??
          Interesting...I wonder if other parts of the car were "overlooked" like the hood, trunk...

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Chantony View Post
            The Australian assembled Larks and Cruisers from 63 to 65 appeared to have no paint or rust protection inside the doors-just bare metal.
            I don't think that the part quality varied that much Tony. What happened in the case of the knocked down cars shipped for export most likely was that the processes done on the South Bend assembly line were not utilised on K/D units.

            These doors were probably pulled from warehouse stock and assembled in the crates without processing. The reason I suspect that, is the replacement doors I have gotten from Parts Depots were exactly that way.
            I would think that the private "Assemblers" in other Countries wanted to do the labor locally to create local jobs and save money on the purchase, so they even "built" the doors themselves. That would include window runs, channels, regulators, vent window assemblies, glass, latches, locks, mouldings and IF they wanted to, interior UNDERCOATING!
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

            Comment

            Working...
            X