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  • K-Body Seat Belts

    Please, do not highjack the thread. Does anyone have any information or ideas on how to install a three point seatbelt in a K body.? Can it be done as in the Mercedes which attaches to the B pillar. (K-Body, hard top convertible, not a pillared body.)

    BG

  • #2
    Have you tried asking the engineers at your state registration authority. I know here in South Australia there is an vehicle inspection center and I'm certain they'd give advice about such matters, you must have one there too.

    John Clements
    Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
    Lockleys South Australia
    John Clements
    Christchurch, New Zealand

    Comment


    • #3
      Have you tried asking the engineers at your state registration authority. I know here in South Australia there is an vehicle inspection center and I'm certain they'd give advice about such matters, you must have one there too.

      John Clements
      Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
      Lockleys South Australia
      John Clements
      Christchurch, New Zealand

      Comment


      • #4
        Ask anyone here in NYS DMV? Dial the DMV phone number and you get 30 min. of instructions of doing it on the web. If youask about an antique car, you get a woman who has been in her chair since 1931.

        I would really like to figure it out though. With the Mercedes the belt is behind the seat in the area where the side window is. Itis anchored in the post and so is the tensioner. Quite a design.

        Bill

        Comment


        • #5
          Ask anyone here in NYS DMV? Dial the DMV phone number and you get 30 min. of instructions of doing it on the web. If youask about an antique car, you get a woman who has been in her chair since 1931.

          I would really like to figure it out though. With the Mercedes the belt is behind the seat in the area where the side window is. Itis anchored in the post and so is the tensioner. Quite a design.

          Bill

          Comment


          • #6
            Hey bill,

            You could probably just pull all the Mercedes parts off a car in a salvage yard and incorporate them into your K.

            What about doing something similar to what the newer ford pickups have, where the upper belt goes into the seat. Again, you could probably pull the parts you need out of a salvage truck. Heck, you could probably pull the whole bench seat if you weren't particular about keepin the original seat in the car.

            Just some thoughts.

            --------
            Restoring my grandfather's '60 Lark, one rusted bolt at a time.

            Maple Lake, Minnesota
            '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

            "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

            Comment


            • #7
              Hey bill,

              You could probably just pull all the Mercedes parts off a car in a salvage yard and incorporate them into your K.

              What about doing something similar to what the newer ford pickups have, where the upper belt goes into the seat. Again, you could probably pull the parts you need out of a salvage truck. Heck, you could probably pull the whole bench seat if you weren't particular about keepin the original seat in the car.

              Just some thoughts.

              --------
              Restoring my grandfather's '60 Lark, one rusted bolt at a time.

              Maple Lake, Minnesota
              '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

              "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

              Comment


              • #8
                Bill,

                When doing my '53 K I researched into how this could be done. I found a very few articles on-line. Then I went trudging through the old swampy boneyard looking at late 60s and early 70s hardtop cars like pontiac lemans, ford torino's etc. Those had a 2 pc setup with a lap belt and a separate shoulder belt that stowed on the roof above the door when not in use. 2 separate sets of buckles to hook up too. Not only kind of messy but the cars I found with intact hardware were so weathered that the belting would all need to be replaced. The plastic buckles would look out of place in a 50s car too I thought.

                I found some universal belt kits from this company:

                http://www.andoauto.com/

                Then I made up brackets and installed a non-retracting shoulder belt setup in my '53:

                Roof rail brackets:



                The brackets bolt behind the roof rail with grade 8 bolts like this and a cable snap goes in for a connection to the 3rd pt of the belt hardware.



                Finally, here is what they look like holding my shop rag box in place.



                The big problem with the setup is they don't retract. You get in and cinch yourself in place and then cannot move around or lean to get the radio knobs, etc. The other side problem is they are too close to the neck and I have to put on a padded cover found in the do-dads section of the auto parts store for that very purpose. If I had to redo it, I think I may relocate things a little to make the fitup better.

                I do have some roller things on the belts to pull up the slack when they are not used so they don't flop about.



                Jeff in ND

                '53 Champion Hardtop
                sigpic
                Jeff in ND

                Comment


                • #9
                  Bill,

                  When doing my '53 K I researched into how this could be done. I found a very few articles on-line. Then I went trudging through the old swampy boneyard looking at late 60s and early 70s hardtop cars like pontiac lemans, ford torino's etc. Those had a 2 pc setup with a lap belt and a separate shoulder belt that stowed on the roof above the door when not in use. 2 separate sets of buckles to hook up too. Not only kind of messy but the cars I found with intact hardware were so weathered that the belting would all need to be replaced. The plastic buckles would look out of place in a 50s car too I thought.

                  I found some universal belt kits from this company:

                  http://www.andoauto.com/

                  Then I made up brackets and installed a non-retracting shoulder belt setup in my '53:

                  Roof rail brackets:



                  The brackets bolt behind the roof rail with grade 8 bolts like this and a cable snap goes in for a connection to the 3rd pt of the belt hardware.



                  Finally, here is what they look like holding my shop rag box in place.



                  The big problem with the setup is they don't retract. You get in and cinch yourself in place and then cannot move around or lean to get the radio knobs, etc. The other side problem is they are too close to the neck and I have to put on a padded cover found in the do-dads section of the auto parts store for that very purpose. If I had to redo it, I think I may relocate things a little to make the fitup better.

                  I do have some roller things on the belts to pull up the slack when they are not used so they don't flop about.



                  Jeff in ND

                  '53 Champion Hardtop
                  sigpic
                  Jeff in ND

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The Ford idea is neat. I have not seen one. After seeing what happened to the Gov. of NJ, who wasn't wearing a belt we got to thinking. I have always been afraid of the steering post on the Hawk when I discovered it was a long steel rod.

                    Bill

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The Ford idea is neat. I have not seen one. After seeing what happened to the Gov. of NJ, who wasn't wearing a belt we got to thinking. I have always been afraid of the steering post on the Hawk when I discovered it was a long steel rod.

                      Bill

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by Jeff_H



                        Then I made up brackets and installed a non-retracting shoulder belt setup in my '53:

                        Roof rail brackets:
                        I like that, that give me an idea. I would use your type of bracket, and "hang" a modern tensioning device that goes to the floor. When not in use, the upper part could be removed and car would look "stock" Just two "hooks" sticking down.

                        Bill

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by Jeff_H



                          Then I made up brackets and installed a non-retracting shoulder belt setup in my '53:

                          Roof rail brackets:
                          I like that, that give me an idea. I would use your type of bracket, and "hang" a modern tensioning device that goes to the floor. When not in use, the upper part could be removed and car would look "stock" Just two "hooks" sticking down.

                          Bill

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by avantilover

                            Have you tried asking the engineers at your state registration authority. I know here in South Australia there is an vehicle inspection center and I'm certain they'd give advice about such matters, you must have one there too.

                            John Clements
                            Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
                            Lockleys South Australia
                            John, we don't have a version of the ASRF. We don't need engineers going over your hot rod to get it registered (the local DMV is another story). The US is basically a 'run what 'ya brung' when it comes to vintage cars and hot rods.

                            Bill, without carving up the trim panels on your 56J, I don't know how to work in the retractors. If using a 2 point belt, the factory mounting locations shouldn't be that hard to find. I'm planning on mounting the retractors in my 64J behind the quarter trim and running the belt thru the upper portion of the trim panel just below the quarter glass.

                            Just a note about belts, steering columns and old cars. The idea of the belt is to keep you from being thrown from the car. Belts and bodies flex enough during the course of a collision, so I doubt either will keep you from kissing the steering wheel. A three point is better than a two point, but not by much.

                            Steering columns in older cars were not made to colapse like modern columns are. They are rigidly mounted and move with the steering box and frame. As older cars were not engineered to 'give', the column will move with the collision. In a hard front end impact the column is going to come back at you, even if the seat belt does it's job. In my Daytona, I've got a tilt column from Ididit that also has a colapse feature.

                            Old cars do not give. Safety wasn't the selling point it is now. In restoring a car, it's hard to improve the safety without damaging the originality. I've seen the pictures of '50's car accidents and do not think they'll be a lot you can do anyways just because of the way they are constructed. The New Jersey Governor most like would be dead if this accident happened in a '55 Studebaker truck vs a late model suburban.

                            ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Tom - Valrico, FL

                            1964 Studebaker Daytona

                            Tom - Bradenton, FL

                            1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                            1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              quote:Originally posted by avantilover

                              Have you tried asking the engineers at your state registration authority. I know here in South Australia there is an vehicle inspection center and I'm certain they'd give advice about such matters, you must have one there too.

                              John Clements
                              Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
                              Lockleys South Australia
                              John, we don't have a version of the ASRF. We don't need engineers going over your hot rod to get it registered (the local DMV is another story). The US is basically a 'run what 'ya brung' when it comes to vintage cars and hot rods.

                              Bill, without carving up the trim panels on your 56J, I don't know how to work in the retractors. If using a 2 point belt, the factory mounting locations shouldn't be that hard to find. I'm planning on mounting the retractors in my 64J behind the quarter trim and running the belt thru the upper portion of the trim panel just below the quarter glass.

                              Just a note about belts, steering columns and old cars. The idea of the belt is to keep you from being thrown from the car. Belts and bodies flex enough during the course of a collision, so I doubt either will keep you from kissing the steering wheel. A three point is better than a two point, but not by much.

                              Steering columns in older cars were not made to colapse like modern columns are. They are rigidly mounted and move with the steering box and frame. As older cars were not engineered to 'give', the column will move with the collision. In a hard front end impact the column is going to come back at you, even if the seat belt does it's job. In my Daytona, I've got a tilt column from Ididit that also has a colapse feature.

                              Old cars do not give. Safety wasn't the selling point it is now. In restoring a car, it's hard to improve the safety without damaging the originality. I've seen the pictures of '50's car accidents and do not think they'll be a lot you can do anyways just because of the way they are constructed. The New Jersey Governor most like would be dead if this accident happened in a '55 Studebaker truck vs a late model suburban.

                              ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              Tom - Valrico, FL

                              1964 Studebaker Daytona

                              Tom - Bradenton, FL

                              1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                              1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                              Comment

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