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No patterns no skills!! let the wood work begin

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  • No patterns no skills!! let the wood work begin

    I am starting on my first ever wood replacement in a car, we shall see success or tooth picks galore

    http://share.shutterfly.com/share/re...6c0174d04ca2d2

  • #2
    You are a brave man . It looks like nothing is left to take a pattern from.

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    • #3
      Wow! Great car and big project. I would love to have a nice pre-war Stude to play with. I would love to have a dry enough place to tackle that kind of project. If I did...I would pester everyone I could find that had any knowledge or skill in doing that kind of restoration. However, I also wouldn't hesitate to use alternative materials where possible as long as they would be covered up and undetected after the finished project.

      Was this car really used as a commercial taxi? If so...are you going to keep the taxi theme?

      And last...good luck and be thankful you don't live near me...you'd have to run me off!
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

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      • #4
        JeezOCrimeny! Unless you're looking for a perfect restore, I'd find me an old station wagon with the same size roof and replace it with metal. Then you could cover it with fabric if you wanted. That looks like a nightmare.

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        • #5
          That is an AWESOME project to take on!! I would love to do something like that. Is the roof a wood skeleton with the fabric as a cover? Doesn't look like it was ALL wood on top. If it was just a skeleton, just take measurements to space the ribs and a perimeter frame. I assume the ribs are bowed, so you might need to build a steam/water bath for the ribs.

          I am jealous.

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          • #6
            Having owned a few wooden boats, I say there is little as satisfying as wood working where unlike houses nothing has square corners or edges. You will find is more like making furniture so when questions arise ask the boat builders or furniture makers. Best of luck.

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            • #7
              I've never seen anything quite like that. Although it does look like like it might not be as difficult as it first looks if it's limited to the top of the roof. If there is there more wood in other parts of the body, and that's just the tip of the iceberg you've got a much bigger project.

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              • #8
                I took on a similar project about 25 years ago on a 1928 Studebaker Erskine that was in about the same condition. I ended up signing up for a adult "woodshop " class at the local high/trade school which gave me access to all kinds of wood working tools (planers, band saws, etc.). The instructor was very helpful and provided a great deal of guidance and flexibility with my project. This is something you might want to consider, if available in your area.

                I recall being advised at the time to be sure to use white oak for the structural members, not red oak as it has certain chemicals that were not conductive to contact with steel (sheet metal) and to use ash for the top bows. I beleive you will find that there are two large "beams" that run along both sides of the top that will need to be replaced and these are mortised and tenioned into the door and body support posts. These were a royal pain to get apart. You may also find that the sheet metal is nailed to the wood framing in a number of places, which is also a challenge to get apart.

                My advice is don't dispair; others have succesfully done this with limited woodworking background. Be sure to keep us posted as to how you progress on this project.
                Last edited by dpson; 08-05-2010, 01:14 PM.
                Dan Peterson
                Montpelier, VT
                1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
                1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jclary View Post
                  Wow! Great car and big project. I would love to have a nice pre-war Stude to play with. I would love to have a dry enough place to tackle that kind of project. If I did...I would pester everyone I could find that had any knowledge or skill in doing that kind of restoration. However, I also wouldn't hesitate to use alternative materials where possible as long as they would be covered up and undetected after the finished project.

                  Was this car really used as a commercial taxi? If so...are you going to keep the taxi theme?

                  And last...good luck and be thankful you don't live near me...you'd have to run me off!
                  I'm looking at some plastifiber material, as far as i can tell the wood is layered side by side and then finish formed to make the curve. No it wasn't a commercial Taxi, the previous owner bought it from a company that furnished background vehicles for movie, TV and photo op sets. It was used in Young Indiana Jones, i have a picture of that. I'm trying to gather more info on it. I am going to keep it painted as is.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BobGlasscock View Post
                    That is an AWESOME project to take on!! I would love to do something like that. Is the roof a wood skeleton with the fabric as a cover? Doesn't look like it was ALL wood on top. If it was just a skeleton, just take measurements to space the ribs and a perimeter frame. I assume the ribs are bowed, so you might need to build a steam/water bath for the ribs.

                    I am jealous.
                    Yes it is a skeleton frame that runs down each side and on both ends with bows across the top (they are pretty good so i have a pattern for them) iT is a four layer top cover with chiken wire, cotton batting, cloth sheeting and finally the top material. The ribs can be saw cut from ash boards or composit material, the rest is going to be challenging.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 55coupe View Post
                      You are a brave man . It looks like nothing is left to take a pattern from.
                      My relatives and friends have a much more criptic description of me, a couple are considering giving me a stay at special location.

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                      • #12
                        I know I will probably catch some flack for this , but have you thought about using thin-wall, square, steel tubing for much of the structural stuff? I have done a couple of Model A Fords this way and it has worked well. Easy to shape and you can tack weld it to the body. Modern glues take the place of tacks for the top and upholstery. Of course, I understand metal--wood and me don't get along unless it's mesquite for the barbeque.

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                        • #13
                          Best of luck!

                          I tried working with wood once, it doesnt weld worth a crap and when you finally get it hot enough to lay a good bead, it bursts into flames.
                          http://datinmanspeaks.blogspot.com/

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                          • #14
                            I've seen antique Carriages which were worse. In those there isn't the luxury of a metal covering to hide your boo-boos. Yeah, it's going to be a bit of work. Another resource you might think of are the carriage enthusiasts. Especially the ones who deal with large towne vehicles and coaches. There are a few around.

                            I don't know of a one in Arizona, however you might try an internet search on Antique Carriages, restoration and repair. Don't be surprised when most of the people are in Missouri, Ohio, and Pennsylvania though. There are, by the way, books out on coach building and antique automobile re-construction techniques.
                            Last edited by studeclunker; 08-05-2010, 08:28 PM.
                            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                            Ron Smith
                            Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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                            • #15
                              Working all the angles

                              Another resource you might think of are the carriage enthusiasts. Especially the ones who deal with large towne vehicles and coaches. There are a few around.

                              I don't know of a one in Arizona, however you might try an internet search on Antique Carriages, restoration and repair. Don't be surprised when most of the people are in Missouri, Ohio, and Pennsylvania though. There are, by the way, books out on coach building and antique automobile re-construction techniques.
                              [/QUOTE]I have five books that were recommended, i don't have the kaching to hire it out, but that's a good suggestion there are quite a few carriage restorers around southern, AZ. (we have the largest horse drawn rodeo parade in the U.S. every year). Right now I'm measuring, numbering, and making a drawing and of course researching the how too. Now that i think i'm retired i have a lot of time.

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