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Did only two Avanti "EX" (Studebaker Engineering "Mule" cars) survive?

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  • #31
    More on the Loewy-designed BMW:









    Craig

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    • #32

      Chris Dresbach

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      • #33
        I drove this car when it was for sale in Chicago back in 1973. It was red with a red int and automatic. It had an ex serial engine at the time with R3 heads and induction. I know the paint was terrible and I don't think it was originally red. At the time the car was pretty rough for a ridiculous asking price of $3200 or so. The fellow had purchased it from a friend of the Granatelli's. The car was later purchased by another, primarily for the engine. I don't know what is in it now but I doubt an R3 was reinstalled.

        Originally posted by Rich View Post
        Avanti #1001 (green) and the last Avanti sold (red) by Studebaker are sitting side-by-side in this photo. The Red one is being auction on September 10th. I looked at the engine bay today BEFORE reading the post above that said it MIGHT have an R-3. If it is an R-3, the supercharger is either in the trunk or missing. When I first saw this car the hood was stuck shut. I told them how to pop the latches, but they must have forgot - they put the car up on a rack & removed the radiator and support, then unbolted the hood.



        Rich

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        • #34
          I went back today and looked over the red Avanti, verified the serial number as #5653. If it had an R3 at one time, it's no longer there. It's a plain 289 auto, no A/C. The car is very rough - the frame and hog troughs have surface rust but fixable, the rear cross-member is rusted through, the front suspension looks like it needs rebuilt, everything in the engine compartment is terribly rusted or oil covered. However, the body is very solid as is the glass and most components of the interior. As mentioned above, the radiator has been removed (to allow them to unbolt the hood).

          If anyone is interested in bidding on the car when it comes up for auction and wants further info, let me know.

          Rich

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          • #35
            Read the museum plaque for the 1962 Fastback above. At the bottom is, "Did you Know?" The answer is a bit confusing to me. Says, "It's a three door, with two doors on one side and four on the other."

            Is this new age math? At least the whole family could enter the car from the same side. For some reason this really cracks me up.
            Last edited by studefan; 08-09-2010, 07:24 PM.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by studefan View Post
              Read the museum plaque for the 1962 Fastback above. At the bottom is, "Did you Know?" The answer is a bit confusing to me. Says, "It's a three door, with two doors on one side and four on the other."

              Is this new age math? At least the whole family could enter the car from the same side. For some reason this really cracks me up.
              The three door was so they could show the car as a two-door and a four-door without building two mockups. Just a time and cost saving measure for the design department for displaying potential cars for production. I wouldn't be surprised if it was a common thing for other car maker design departments as well.
              Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by studefan View Post
                Read the museum plaque for the 1962 Fastback above. At the bottom is, "Did you Know?" The answer is a bit confusing to me. Says, "It's a three door, with two doors on one side and four on the other."

                Is this new age math? At least the whole family could enter the car from the same side. For some reason this really cracks me up.
                It looks like a four door on one side, and looks like a two door on the other is what I think they mean. I have seen this treatment on some stude prototypes including a photo I have of a model N. These are the only "real" ones that I know of that have this though, the pics I have of "two cars in one prototype" are all clay models.
                Chris Dresbach

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                • #38
                  Yes, I am familiar with the idea of two different designs on a single mockup/platform.

                  I was just getting a kick out of the way it was worded which states there are two doors on one side and "four" doors on the other.

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                  • #39
                    I cannot recall whether this was used for the Avanti or not(although I remember the idea being thrown around by Studebaker), but I found it humorous at the Chicago Auto Show a few years back when they reintroduced the idea on the Saturn Sky, and when they had it on an S-10 we use to have. When it was executed properly the "three door" idea worked rather well, particularly on the S-10 as it allowed for two passengers to sit up front, and a third to have a foldout chair with a cupholder and a little space to spread out behind the driver or passenger seat.
                    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by herbpcpa View Post
                      After Studebaker closed down production in South Bend they sold off the Engineering Department's prototype Avantis, posssibly after doing some further modifications to make them useable to the new owner. Two of these "EX" Avantis are known to still exist. One is #EX-2942, the "Due Cento" which was probably the property of the Granatellis and they were the ones who sold it not Studebaker Corp. The other is EX-2497 which was renumbered R-5653 and will be sold at auction in Washington state in September. At one time this Avanti had an R3 engine and A/C. Wonder if that is how it left South Bend or if someone did those modifications later?

                      Are any other "EX" Avantis still in existance or are they all gone?
                      Taking a shot at getting this thread back on track...
                      Wolfie just mentioned that the 2 recent museum cars are indeed numbered "EX". He did not imply they were Avanti's. But the original question is about "EX" numbered Avanti's only, not all prototypes.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Michidan View Post
                        Taking a shot at getting this thread back on track...
                        Wolfie just mentioned that the 2 recent museum cars are indeed numbered "EX". He did not imply they were Avanti's. But the original question is about "EX" numbered Avanti's only, not all prototypes.
                        Nice to see someone is taking the effort to get it back on 'EX'-numbered Avantis only. Here is some more on Avantis that had an 'EX' prefix in the serial number:

                        http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...light=hemmings

                        Craig

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