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Still another Studebaker story

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  • Still another Studebaker story

    We all run in to people who have Studebaker stories to tell us when they see our cars or hear that we are in to Studebakers. Most are "colorful" and error-ridden. Today, though, I got one that was very interesting.
    The Potomac Chapter is having a Fun Day on Sunday, July 11 where we are going to meet at the C&O Canal National Historical Park in Potomac, Maryland (wealthy Washington, DC suburb). One of our members, Mark Myers, is a Park Ranger there and he has arranged for us to park in a special area for display and also to get a free ride on the mule-powered canal boat at the park. Actually, Mark is the "mule skinner"- takes care of the mule teams they use. Some of us from the western part of the chapter membership area are planning to meet and caravan to the park. I decided that the WV Tourist Information Center at Harpers Ferry would be a good spot to meet. So, today I stopped there and asked the volunteer at the desk if it would be OK for us to use their parking area to join up. He said I'd have to ask the man upstairs (no, not God, just the boss in the upstairs office). So, I went up and introduced myself as asked about using their location for our car club. He asked if it was an antique auto group. I told him it was a Studebaker club. Next thing he said was "My first car was a '49 Studebaker- with a Hill Holder". He said he always gets a kick out of someone telling him that Toyota invented this neat device to keep you from rolling back on a hill. He went on to explain that his dad had been the Studebaker dealer in Dixon, Illinois right up through the end of Studebaker production. He said it was neat being the son of the dealer because he always got to ride in the first new Studebakers that came in each year. He also told me something I had never heard. He said salesmen (and dealers) got points for cars sold. There was a merchandise catalog from which they could use their Studebaker sales points to buy merchandise. He said his dad always got enough points that every so often they would all sit down and look at new chairs or tables or whatever they needed for the house.
    Oh yes, he said OK on the use- the center would be open at that hour and we were welcome to use the rest rooms if we wanted.
    Last edited by 53k; 07-02-2010, 04:55 PM. Reason: add Hill Holder part of the story
    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

  • #2
    Yes that was the J. B. McDonald Co. Catalog they were hired by Studebaker in 1960 to run the Contest. It had many useful items for the sales points. We got a new Jacobson Reel type 2 cycle Lawn Mower, a Westinghouse roaster Oven and table, I got a alarm clock, Remington 22 model 512A bolt action repeating Rifle, a Portable radio, we got a 1 gal. Camping jug by Thermos, a Coleman Ice Chest, Coleman Lantern and folding camping table, Lawn Table and matching Umbrella etc. etc. Dad sold a really BIG bunch of 59-'61 Larks!
    I have posted about this before when someone found a copy of the catalog.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #3
      [QUOTE=53k;469745]We all run in to people who have Studebaker stories to tell us when they see our cars or hear that we are in to Studebakers.

      You ought to arrange an interview with the gentleman, and write a story about the dealership. Perhaps, he has some little things left over from the dealership, records, sales items, interesting point of view from within.
      Bo

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      • #4
        [QUOTE=bomarkham;469918]
        Originally posted by 53k View Post
        We all run in to people who have Studebaker stories to tell us when they see our cars or hear that we are in to Studebakers.

        You ought to arrange an interview with the gentleman, and write a story about the dealership. Perhaps, he has some little things left over from the dealership, records, sales items, interesting point of view from within.
        I plan to Bo. He is a writer himself (books on Harpers Ferry area history, etc). He can probably think of a lot more to tell too- just didn't have time to talk to him then.
        Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
        '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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        • #5
          Last evening I stopped at a local ice cream place in my '40 Champion Coupe Delivery (a friend was driving my '41). A lady in her 60's was looking at the cars as we were preparing to depart. I ask her if she was a Studebaker owner. She said that no she wasn't an owner but she was run over by one when she was 5 years old! She remembers waking up in a nearby diner on a table where she had been carried. She was not actually run over but hit and knocked down and had no serious injuries. This happened in 1948 so she was checking the cars to see if either was the culprit! So when you say that you often "run into" people who have had an interesting Studebaker story here is one who was really "run into!"
          Richard Quinn
          Editor emeritus: Antique Studebaker Review

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