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Found another business coupe (47 Champion)

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  • sals54
    replied
    Yes, it did come from Plymouth. I already talked to Roy about it. He's disappointed that he didn't get it. Sorry Roy.

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by studeclunker View Post
    Mr. Clary, the "Doctor's Buggy," as we call it today was originally offered as a, "Runabout." This vehicle was wildly popular throughout the country as it was easy to turn out with a single horse. They were often very sturdy and in some cases (the Concord model for instance) were specifically designed to ford rivers safely. They were relatively cheap (Sears and Roebuck sold them for fifty dollars in 1901), and cheap to turn out with just one horse. Hence, our limitation of this vehicle to just a 'Doctor's ' vehicle is a bit of a misnomer. They really weren't a Professional's vehicle as much as the 'econobubble' of their time.

    John, Sal, I'm dying to know where this car was hiding. C'mon, give here! Where did you find this old jewell?

    I checked with Sal, he hauled it from Plymouth Ca.

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  • studeclunker
    replied
    Mr. Clary, the "Doctor's Buggy," as we call it today was originally offered as a, "Runabout." This vehicle was wildly popular throughout the country as it was easy to turn out with a single horse. They were often very sturdy and in some cases (the Concord model for instance) were specifically designed to ford rivers safely. They were relatively cheap (Sears and Roebuck sold them for fifty dollars in 1901), and cheap to turn out with just one horse. Hence, our limitation of this vehicle to just a 'Doctor's ' vehicle is a bit of a misnomer. They really weren't a Professional's vehicle as much as the 'econobubble' of their time.

    John, Sal, I'm dying to know where this car was hiding. C'mon, give here! Where did you find this old jewell?

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    I agree, and seeing it in the weeds like this, just made it more unusual.BTW, it must have been there for awhile, the dry rotted, flat tires tread actually peeled off where they stuck to the ground.
    Last edited by JDP; 06-07-2010, 08:19 AM.

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  • jclary
    replied

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  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by BBStude View Post
    I'm currently restoring one of these. They are rare and it's nice to see one all together. Not too fond of the white top though. I'd sure like to get my hands on a lot of detailed pictures of the interior as mine was completely trashed by a rat on steroids and growth hormones. As someone already said, these cars were prone to a lot of rust at the bottom of the door pilars where the body mounts connects. I've had to completely rebuild mine. Good luck.
    Here's the interior, as found. What's right or wrong, is up to the experts.

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  • BBStude
    replied
    I'm currently restoring one of these. They are rare and it's nice to see one all together. Not too fond of the white top though. I'd sure like to get my hands on a lot of detailed pictures of the interior as mine was completely trashed by a rat on steroids and growth hormones. As someone already said, these cars were prone to a lot of rust at the bottom of the door pilars where the body mounts connects. I've had to completely rebuild mine. Good luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Here's one answer...
    Think salesman from 1947, and not car collector.
    A white top makes the car cooler inside (remember....no a/c)..
    A darker body hides road grime (think less car washes)
    Only things that car is missing are a sun visor, a swamp coller, and a load of Watkins (or Fuller) literature and samples.
    Quite a nice example...
    Jeff

    Originally posted by kurtruk View Post
    RE: Question about the white top.
    Originally posted by kurtruk View Post
    I think it takes away from the lines that are admired today on this body style. The long lines are broken up by the "highlighted" cabin area. But I don't think it will keep it from selling. People that want this body style know what they really look like. Painting over the white doesn't seem like it fits with your "business model." What would you do to try to match the present condition of the paint? My opinion.

    Now---about those dreadful stainless gravelshields and front fender ornaments. No way will it ever sell with those parts mucking up the works! You must remove them immediately. In fact send them to me and I'll dispose of them for you. (Smilie) Besides, the stainless gravelshields aren't factory equipment on this bodystyle. I'm just helping you out!

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by kurtruk View Post
    RE: Question about the white top.
    I think it takes away from the lines that are admired today on this body style. The long lines are broken up by the "highlighted" cabin area. But I don't think it will keep it from selling. People that want this body style know what they really look like. Painting over the white doesn't seem like it fits with your "business model." What would you do to try to match the present condition of the paint? My opinion.

    Now---about those dreadful stainless gravelshields and front fender ornaments. No way will it ever sell with those parts mucking up the works! You must remove them immediately. In fact send them to me and I'll dispose of them for you. (Smilie) Besides, the stainless gravelshields aren't factory equipment on this bodystyle. I'm just helping you out!

    I had forgotten about those little fender ornaments, and I'll keep the shields, but thanks for the offer. We got the car near Sal in Ca. I don't recall exactly where.

    Leave a comment:


  • kurtruk
    replied
    RE: Question about the white top.
    I think it takes away from the lines that are admired today on this body style. The long lines are broken up by the "highlighted" cabin area. But I don't think it will keep it from selling. People that want this body style know what they really look like. Painting over the white doesn't seem like it fits with your "business model." What would you do to try to match the present condition of the paint? My opinion.

    Now---about those dreadful stainless gravelshields and front fender ornaments. No way will it ever sell with those parts mucking up the works! You must remove them immediately. In fact send them to me and I'll dispose of them for you. (Smilie) Besides, the stainless gravelshields aren't factory equipment on this bodystyle. I'm just helping you out!
    Last edited by kurtruk; 06-06-2010, 09:08 PM. Reason: More sarcasm needed

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  • studeclunker
    replied
    Yeah, Sal, John, just where did you find this old treasure?

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  • royvaldez
    replied
    Did you get Bus. Coupe out of Plymouth, Ca?

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  • jclary
    replied
    As in "life is like a box of chocolates"...

    Speaking from experience, (a six-year project), on one of these cars you really don't know what you have until you do the following.
    Remove all floor covering
    Remove all kick panels (front and the ones along the side behind the doors)
    Separate the fenders from the front firewall and door post.
    Separate the rear finders and check inside the "mud baffle" areas.
    Remove the gravel guards and see if any fender is left behind them.
    Check all body mounts, especially the boxes under the door pillar posts.
    Take all clamps loose that hold the steel fuel line to the frame and make sure there is an actual intact fuel passage under the clamps.
    Once this is done you only have to worry about the frame and mechanics. Engine, transmission, how much springs are remaining inside those jacketed springs, wiring, and all those other little incidental things that make these things so much fun!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bo Markham
    replied
    I'll trade you a 62 GT with rebuilt motor, power brake boaster, carb (T-bow), rust free body (some surface rust), new upholstery, carpet (needs finish install).

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by Bullet View Post
    There was a 50 Champ Business coupe for sale at Glendale in the Swap meet area. The seller wanted $5k for it. Pretty steep I thought, since it did not have a front seat/interior and the trunk was bumgie corded on. Could not see the engine area, but it did come with some kind of extra parts. This 47 looks alot better!

    Mark
    If we got 5K for this one, we'd be doing cart wheels, but who knows ?

    Leave a comment:

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