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  • Progress on . . . . Boris????

    I finally got the last seat track bolt out, so I can get at the floor.

    Good grief! Other floor to frame bolts seem to be about 1 1/4" long with a tapered tip. The seat bolts were about 2 1/2" long, fine threaded, and run through small blocks of wood sitting on top of teh seat rail. I bent the ends of two open end 9/16 wrenches before I was done!

    So is this fairly typical rust? . . . not so bad? . . . or, "You're crazy for even trying!" rust?



    Oh, and since everyone else seems to have a name for their project, I was thinking of "Boris" for this big black car. Does it fit his character?

    Paul

    1950 Land Cruiser project

    I finally have a Stude I can drive! (sort of)
    1962 GT Hawk, 4 speed, a/c

  • #2
    I've seen worse, LOTS worse.

    ________________________
    Mark Anderson
    1965 Cruiser
    http://home.alltel.net/anderm

    Comment


    • #3
      I've seen worse, LOTS worse.

      ________________________
      Mark Anderson
      1965 Cruiser
      http://home.alltel.net/anderm

      Comment


      • #4
        The rust is pretty typical for your area and the car is 57 years old after all.The rust is worse than some but not as bad as others I've seen. Repair panels are available from classic enterprises. With some patience and determination it will get done.I've done several like yours in the past.Good luck.
        Frank van Doorn
        Omaha, Ne.
        1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
        1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
        1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

        Comment


        • #5
          The rust is pretty typical for your area and the car is 57 years old after all.The rust is worse than some but not as bad as others I've seen. Repair panels are available from classic enterprises. With some patience and determination it will get done.I've done several like yours in the past.Good luck.
          Frank van Doorn
          Omaha, Ne.
          1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
          1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
          1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by 41 Frank

            The rust is pretty typical for your area and the car is 57 years old after all.The rust is worse than some but not as bad as others I've seen. Repair panels are available from classic enterprises. With some patience and determination it will get done.I've done several like yours in the past.Good luck.
            It was originally a Tennessee car. It spent the later years in MIchigan, though.

            CE panels. Yep. I figure it's going to take front and rear floor panels for both sides, a trunk floor panel, and both rockers. I haven't looked really close at the body mounts yet.



            Paul

            1950 Land Cruiser project

            I finally have a Stude I can drive! (sort of)
            1962 GT Hawk, 4 speed, a/c

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by 41 Frank

              The rust is pretty typical for your area and the car is 57 years old after all.The rust is worse than some but not as bad as others I've seen. Repair panels are available from classic enterprises. With some patience and determination it will get done.I've done several like yours in the past.Good luck.
              It was originally a Tennessee car. It spent the later years in MIchigan, though.

              CE panels. Yep. I figure it's going to take front and rear floor panels for both sides, a trunk floor panel, and both rockers. I haven't looked really close at the body mounts yet.



              Paul

              1950 Land Cruiser project

              I finally have a Stude I can drive! (sort of)
              1962 GT Hawk, 4 speed, a/c

              Comment


              • #8
                A little tip, do one side at a time and have the car supported with the jack stands under the rear axle and front suspension, not under the frame if you want it up off the ground.This way it is less likely you will wind up with body panels that don't line up.
                Frank van Doorn
                Omaha, Ne.
                1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
                1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
                1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

                Comment


                • #9
                  A little tip, do one side at a time and have the car supported with the jack stands under the rear axle and front suspension, not under the frame if you want it up off the ground.This way it is less likely you will wind up with body panels that don't line up.
                  Frank van Doorn
                  Omaha, Ne.
                  1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
                  1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
                  1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'd call that stage 3 rust since it's spread to the pillars and rockers. I've seen worse, but I don't tackle floors like those any more, i.e. the wagon I just sold had those floors. I prefer stage 1 "pin holes" or stage 2 (bigger hole, but solid pillars)

                    64 Commander-64 Daytona
                    64 GT R2 clone-63 GT R2
                    63 Avanti R1
                    63 Daytona convert-63
                    63 Lark 2 door
                    62 Lark 2 door
                    60 Lark HT-60Hawk
                    59 3E truck
                    52 & 53 Starliner
                    51 Commander

                    JDP Maryland

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'd call that stage 3 rust since it's spread to the pillars and rockers. I've seen worse, but I don't tackle floors like those any more, i.e. the wagon I just sold had those floors. I prefer stage 1 "pin holes" or stage 2 (bigger hole, but solid pillars)

                      64 Commander-64 Daytona
                      64 GT R2 clone-63 GT R2
                      63 Avanti R1
                      63 Daytona convert-63
                      63 Lark 2 door
                      62 Lark 2 door
                      60 Lark HT-60Hawk
                      59 3E truck
                      52 & 53 Starliner
                      51 Commander

                      JDP Maryland

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Boris' cancer can be cured. It'll take more time than money to do so - so long as you do it yourself OR have a capable friend that will work for a few six-packs.

                        The bottom of the door pillar DOES look nasty, but it also looks like there's enough of it to fasten stuff to. Really hard to say with conviction by looking at one photo.

                        BTW, I've seen alot of this when I lived in Georgia and even some of it here in California.[:I] This is what happens when wet carpeting and it's jute backing are left there as oxidizing agents. Don't really NEED salt to make this happen - only more years of wetness.

                        Miscreant adrift in
                        the BerStuda Triangle


                        1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                        1960 Larkvertible V8
                        1958 Provincial wagon
                        1953 Commander coupe

                        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Boris' cancer can be cured. It'll take more time than money to do so - so long as you do it yourself OR have a capable friend that will work for a few six-packs.

                          The bottom of the door pillar DOES look nasty, but it also looks like there's enough of it to fasten stuff to. Really hard to say with conviction by looking at one photo.

                          BTW, I've seen alot of this when I lived in Georgia and even some of it here in California.[:I] This is what happens when wet carpeting and it's jute backing are left there as oxidizing agents. Don't really NEED salt to make this happen - only more years of wetness.

                          Miscreant adrift in
                          the BerStuda Triangle


                          1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                          1960 Larkvertible V8
                          1958 Provincial wagon
                          1953 Commander coupe

                          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I admire you guys that bring back Studes like this, but I personally wouldn't do it. Here's why.

                            #1 There are still plenty of rust free or near rust free Studes around. Most are in the West. Generally you can buy them for the same price as a MidWest/East Coast rust bucket. If you live in the East, you'll pay $1000-$1500 transport to get it to you. This is a fraction of what it would cost to have a pro fix the rust, probably lower than the cost of patch panels and welding supplies if you do it your self. Your time would have to be a labor of love (and it would be hundreds and hundreds of hours of love)

                            #2 With rust like this, you'll never get it all. You fix the big hunks, and leave what looks like small stuff, and some stuff you can't even see (or find). If the floors and trunk are this bad, how about the rockers, door bottoms, lower fenders, hood front, trunk drip rail, etc.? Will you ever know how bad the frame has rotted? What happens to your new paint job in a year or two? Rust (this bad) is seldom localized. If the car is rusty, the ENTIRE car is rusty.

                            #3 With rusty cars, just the disassembly process is a major event (as you learned with the seats). EVERY nut and bolt is frozen and has to be fought or cut. You get tired of busted tools and busted knuckles pretty quick. Some especially hard ones take days of trying everything you know to remove them. Once you work on a rust free 50 year old car, you'll never go back.

                            The above is just my opinion. Again, I'm glad guys like you save these cars. I guess I'm just too "frugal" with my time and money to attempt it.






                            Dick Steinkamp
                            Bellingham, WA

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I admire you guys that bring back Studes like this, but I personally wouldn't do it. Here's why.

                              #1 There are still plenty of rust free or near rust free Studes around. Most are in the West. Generally you can buy them for the same price as a MidWest/East Coast rust bucket. If you live in the East, you'll pay $1000-$1500 transport to get it to you. This is a fraction of what it would cost to have a pro fix the rust, probably lower than the cost of patch panels and welding supplies if you do it your self. Your time would have to be a labor of love (and it would be hundreds and hundreds of hours of love)

                              #2 With rust like this, you'll never get it all. You fix the big hunks, and leave what looks like small stuff, and some stuff you can't even see (or find). If the floors and trunk are this bad, how about the rockers, door bottoms, lower fenders, hood front, trunk drip rail, etc.? Will you ever know how bad the frame has rotted? What happens to your new paint job in a year or two? Rust (this bad) is seldom localized. If the car is rusty, the ENTIRE car is rusty.

                              #3 With rusty cars, just the disassembly process is a major event (as you learned with the seats). EVERY nut and bolt is frozen and has to be fought or cut. You get tired of busted tools and busted knuckles pretty quick. Some especially hard ones take days of trying everything you know to remove them. Once you work on a rust free 50 year old car, you'll never go back.

                              The above is just my opinion. Again, I'm glad guys like you save these cars. I guess I'm just too "frugal" with my time and money to attempt it.






                              Dick Steinkamp
                              Bellingham, WA

                              Comment

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