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  • 1926 or 1927 Studebaker President - New Member

    I have come across a 1926 or 1927 Studebaker President and am considering restoring it. I want to restore it as close to original as possible and am wanting to do a 'frame-off' restoration. This is my 1st project car and I am all questions. How do I find out how many exist? How do I find out the value of the restored car? The 1st question may lead to the second, but I don't want to put $30-40k into a car that will only be worth $15-20K. The car is in good shape and has been stored under roof for the last 50 years. It has been at least that long since it ran, but all of the parts are there. Any advice on where to begin will be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks.
    Mike

    Mike B
    mbarnhardt@adelphia.net

  • #2
    Hi Mike,

    Sounds like an interesting project! I don't think I've ever seen a restored example of that model and year go for anything near $40K. I can maybe see $30,000 for an extremely nice example, but even that would be hard to do.

    For prewar cars, the most valuable ones seem to be the 1931-1932 models - especially roadsters (I think President roadsters are the ones that bring big money). They often reach well over $100,000 nowadays.

    The antique Studebaker club will have lots of good contacts for you. You can see their website at www.theantiquestudebakerclub.com.
    "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

    Comment


    • #3
      There have been earlier debates about the accuracy of NADA, Kelley and Old Cars Price Guide but I would go ahead and get a copy of Old Cars Price Guide just to get a feel on the values and conditions.

      Definitely contact the Antique Studebaker Club and contact local members. If you peruse this forum you will note we, as a group, want most to help each other.

      Brad Johnson
      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
      33 Rockne 10
      51 Commander Starlight
      53 Commander Starlight

      previously: 63 Cruiser, 62 Regal VI, 60 VI convertible, 50 LandCruiser
      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
      sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

      Comment


      • #4
        My price guide that is several years old starts listing the President in 1927. #1 condition (showroom condition) $14500.00 , so that is appr. what it will be worth when you are finished restoring it. #5 condition ( described as complete not running needing everything) is listed as $1740.00 You will invest quite a bit more then that (#1condition) doing a frame off.Reality is you will no doubt not recover all the restoration costs even if you do all the work yourself. This is coming from a guy that has done several cars (me). Not prewar but they are probably more expensive to do then postwar.
        Frank van Doorn
        Omaha, Ne.
        1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
        1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
        1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

        Comment


        • #5
          I want to echo Franks thoughts. And never having done a resto of any sort, you're biting off a MIGHTY BIG chunk to chew for a first bite. Not saying it can't be done, but for the figure you've thrown out (and Frank's confirmed) you'd better be a HECK of a carpenter and body man, not to mention one heck of a mechanic. Actually, the mechanical part's usually the easiest to tackle. But the wooden framework of the body will need some replacing and there's NO patterns handy to use a reference. Model A and model T fords - stuff abounds. Studebakers - you'll be scratching out each and every detail one by one. And even at that you'll still get hung up and search for stuff that may never avail itself to you![}]
          I guess I'm cautioning you not to let blind enthusiasim overload your rear. Look in detail at what it's gonna need to be rightfully classified as a "frame off" resto when you're done - someday.
          If you're not comfortable fashioning perfectly fitted, odd-shaped pieces of HARD wood and working dents out of wear-weary sheet metal, you're gonna have to turn those points over to a specialist. Read that - expensive. [:0]
          But if you're still convinced, go for it. Most of us on this forum have never ridden in a 20s vintage Studebaker and consequently can't offer much in the way of SPECIFIC tips and tricks. The Antique Studebaker Club is a vibrant club made up of folks who love and know the older Studes. They'd be my primary source of info if I had the notion to do what you endeavor to do.

          Miscreant at large.

          1957 Transtar 1/2ton
          1960 Larkvertible V8
          1958 Provincial wagon
          1953 Commander coupe
          1957 President 2-dr
          1955 President State
          1951 Champion Biz cpe
          1963 Daytona project FS
          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

          Comment


          • #6
            You don't say what body style, but if a sedan, you're probably looking at a value of $15k or so for a fully restored one...more if an open car. My OCPG starts at 1930 for Studebakers and lists a #2 President 4 door sedan at #11,200. The July issue of TW lists a 1925 Standard 6 Duplex Phaeton (fairly rare and attractive car) WITH a 24' trailer for $15,000 (Trailer is probably worth $4k or so).

            IMHO, you would be underwater for sure with a full restoration...even if you could do most of the work yourself. This is not a unique situation, however. As a general rule, you will usually have more money into the restoration of an old car (any old car) than what you can sell it for. You can almost always buy a restored car for far less than it would cost to restore it yourself. It's a hobby. For most, it's enjoyable to restore the car. An ROI isn't part of the equation.

            An alternative is to buy the car and enjoy it as is (or close to as is). IMHO, an unrestored or "in progress" car gets as much or more attention at a car show than a trailer queen.

            I went to an antique tractor show today with my buddy Scott in his unrestored 1923 Buick. He's touched up the paint on the fenders, put tires on it, and little more. We had much more fun driving this car to the show than pulling a restored one through the gate on a trailer.







            Dick Steinkamp
            Bellingham, WA

            Comment


            • #7
              I concur with Biggs, consider joining the Antique Studebaker Club, it is an excellent source for parts and info, you"ll be glad you did.
              Frank van Doorn
              Omaha, Ne.
              1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
              1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
              1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

              Comment


              • #8
                To echo what Dick said, we attended the '97 International in South Bend. There was some one there with an early 30's roadster, not sure what year. It was mechanicly restored but the body was more or less as found. They were having a lot of fun and attracting a lot of attention. You could always do a resto later after enjoying it for a while.

                Don Wilson
                53 Commander Hardtop
                64 Champ 1/2 ton
                Centralia, WA
                Don Wilson, Centralia, WA

                40 Champion 4 door*
                50 Champion 2 door*
                53 Commander K Auto*
                53 Commander K overdrive*
                55 President Speedster
                62 GT 4Speed*
                63 Avanti R1*
                64 Champ 1/2 ton

                * Formerly owned

                Comment


                • #9
                  I agree with Dick and Don.

                  My Rockne was in storage for thirty-one years and I've been driving it now for fourteen years and it gets a lot of attention. I've restored nothing; just made certain everything works as it should.
                  And, after fourteen years, there are probably more repro parts available now than there were then. Not to mention the parts and resources I've made contact with in the interim.

                  Brad Johnson
                  Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                  33 Rockne 10
                  51 Commander Starlight
                  53 Commander Starlight

                  previously: 63 Cruiser, 62 Regal VI, 60 VI convertible, 50 LandCruiser
                  "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                  Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                  Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                  sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    One of the best memories I have of the '02 meet was when this fella who owned a '26 roadster, took me for a midnight ride thru the streets of South Bend.

                    I'm sure I could find this fella's name if I looked but I'm not gonna bother. However, he was a professional musician and he and some like-minded sorts LIVE (as much as is possible) a 20's lifestyle! This includes driving cars of that era.[:0] I was flabberghasted and envious all in one shot!

                    That driver '26 was anything BUT showcar shiny, and yet..... It's driveline was a smooth and sweet as anything you'd care to drive! One fella who posts here occassionally also got treated to a ride that night. There were a couple others as well. Downright FANTASTIC experience it was. One I'll never forget.

                    Miscreant at large.

                    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                    1960 Larkvertible V8
                    1958 Provincial wagon
                    1953 Commander coupe
                    1957 President 2-dr
                    1955 President State
                    1951 Champion Biz cpe
                    1963 Daytona project FS
                    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Wow! I know a guy in California EXACTLY like that! I used to play in his society orchestra. We mostly did 1920s music. I don't think he owns a Studebaker, though, so he's not exactly the same, just eerily close.
                      "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Scott, they probably know of one another. This fella explained to me that there was a "community" of like-minded folks that shared their mania for the 20s. While they're on the road quite a bit (and not necessarily together), there's some town - I wanna say in the southwest some place - where they had their homes and often collaborate on re-living the roaring 20s.
                        Sounds like great fun to me!

                        Miscreant at large.

                        1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                        1960 Larkvertible V8
                        1958 Provincial wagon
                        1953 Commander coupe
                        1957 President 2-dr
                        1955 President State
                        1951 Champion Biz cpe
                        1963 Daytona project FS
                        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Now you guys have made me dig out my Bix Beiderbecke and King Porter records again. Happy Birthday today to Satchmo.

                          Brad Johnson
                          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                          33 Rockne 10
                          51 Commander Starlight
                          53 Commander Starlight

                          previously: 63 Cruiser, 62 Regal VI, 60 VI convertible, 50 LandCruiser
                          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My Studebaker fever started many years ago with a 1929 model,it was a six so I think it was a Commander or possibly a Dictator. The body had collapsed after the soft roof had gone out and all the wood rotted. We made it into a kind of off road buggy/farm tractor. It was one of the toughest brutes I ever had the pleasure of knowing. That engine had enough torque to tow a mountain. We used and abused it and nothing ever broke. I sold it to a guy who was restoring a late twentys hearse and needed the powertrain. How I wish now Id have saved that car.
                            If the body on yours is more or less intact,and the woods mostly good,why not do a frame on(cheaper)resto and enjoy it as a partially restored car as the others suggested? Those old Studes from that era where great cars and a hoot to drive,light years ahead of a Model T or a 490 Chev of the era.
                            Good luck!

                            Comment

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