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  • studebaker runabout horse drawn carriage

    I have an old runabout which has a Studebaker step on the one side. How can I authenicate this beautiful carriage? Thanks, Gayle

  • #2
    quote:Originally posted by gaylepauly

    I have an old runabout which has a Studebaker step on the one side. How can I authenicate this beautiful carriage? Thanks, Gayle
    Gayle,

    I am in no way an expert on horse-drawn Studebakers, but I have seen a few. I believe at least some had a metal plate on one of the axles. There might also be a name cast into the axle spindles or nuts? Studebaker made a big point of promoting their "slope-shouldered spokes" so I would look closely at the area where the spokes meet the wheel rim, and see if that differs from other wagons that you know NOT to be Studebakers.

    Hopefully, some of the other regulars here will have a lot more insight in the mattert than do I.

    BTW, does it have it s original "engine?"

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

    Comment


    • #3
      Gayle,

      I have one sitting on a trailer now in my back yard. If you can post (or send) me a picture I will see how it matches up against mine. As Gord points out, most of the metal axles are stamped with the Studebaker name, thought you may have to remove a wheel to see.

      Gary

      Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

      1946 M-16 fire truck
      1948 M-16 grain truck
      1949 2R16A grain truck
      1949 2R17A fire truck
      1955 E-38 grain truck
      1957 3E-40 flatbed
      1961 6E-28 grain truck
      1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck
      1962 7E-7 Champ pickup
      1962 GT Hawk 4 speed
      1964 Avanti R2 4 speed
      1964 Cruiser
      And various other "treasures"
      Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond & Louisa, Va.
      Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

      The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

      �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

      For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

      "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

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      • #4
        Hi Gary, thanks for getting back to me on this. This is a true horse drawn runabout which I had taken down to the Amish to try to restore to specs but they could not come up with any info so we re-did all the paint and added a colapsable top and re did the apolstry(spell?)in red velvet. It has been painted black with red pin stripes on all the spokes and body. The fill is solid and the buggy frame itself is solid as well. I have never used it for driving and I have owned it since 1980. Let me know how to post a picture and I will try. Thanks, Gayle
        quote:Originally posted by Guido

        Gayle,

        I have one sitting on a trailer now in my back yard. If you can post (or send) me a picture I will see how it matches up against mine. As Gord points out, most of the metal axles are stamped with the Studebaker name, thought you may have to remove a wheel to see.

        Gary

        Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

        1946 M-16 fire truck
        1948 M-16 grain truck
        1949 2R16A grain truck
        1949 2R17A fire truck
        1955 E-38 grain truck
        1957 3E-40 flatbed
        1961 6E-28 grain truck
        1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck
        1962 7E-7 Champ pickup
        1962 GT Hawk 4 speed
        1964 Avanti R2 4 speed
        1964 Cruiser
        And various other "treasures"
        Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond & Louisa, Va.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Gord, thanks for getting back to me. This is a true horse drawn runabout which I tried to have restored to specs but the Amish did not have any info on these so we did the best we could with the original fram and upolstry. It was given a colapsable top and re-upolstried in red velvet. The frame was painted black with red pin striping and the wheels were also painted black with red pin striping as well. It Looks gorgeous but probably not to specs of a Studebaker if it is indeed one. If it does not have any Studebaker stamping on the metal where do I go from there? Thanks, Gayle
          quote:Originally posted by gordr

          quote:Originally posted by gaylepauly

          I have an old runabout which has a Studebaker step on the one side. How can I authenicate this beautiful carriage? Thanks, Gayle
          Gayle,

          I am in no way an expert on horse-drawn Studebakers, but I have seen a few. I believe at least some had a metal plate on one of the axles. There might also be a name cast into the axle spindles or nuts? Studebaker made a big point of promoting their "slope-shouldered spokes" so I would look closely at the area where the spokes meet the wheel rim, and see if that differs from other wagons that you know NOT to be Studebakers.

          Hopefully, some of the other regulars here will have a lot more insight in the mattert than do I.

          BTW, does it have it s original "engine?"

          Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

          Comment


          • #6
            Gayle, you have one of the few Studebakers (if it is one) that dosen't leak oil,be proud.

            Comment


            • #7
              Gayle,

              You can send me a picture directly to guidosalvage at bizland dot com.

              Gary

              Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

              1946 M-16 fire truck
              1948 M-16 grain truck
              1949 2R16A grain truck
              1949 2R17A fire truck
              1955 E-38 grain truck
              1957 3E-40 flatbed
              1961 6E-28 grain truck
              1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck
              1962 7E-7 Champ pickup
              1962 GT Hawk 4 speed
              1964 Avanti R2 4 speed
              1964 Cruiser
              And various other "treasures"
              Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond & Louisa, Va.
              Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

              The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

              �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

              For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

              "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

              Comment


              • #8
                Gayle,
                You need to contact the Carriage Association and the American Driving Society. They both have active and enthusastic Studebaker fanciers. I seriously doubt that red velvet would have been used on a runabout. The reason is weather. Remember, this was a daily transportation vehicle. Kind of like an economy car. Velvet looks and feels great and would go to... well, it would break down fast. Does your seat have a small compartment underneath? Look inside for a maker's plate. Maker's plates were placed under the seat, behind the seat on the riser cross member, and on the backside of the back axle. Studebaker was one of the few manufacturers who did all of their own foundry work. If this carriage has Studebaker Axles, well it is just likely a Studebaker. Other manufacturers used Studebaker foundry parts. They were popular with the Amesbury Mass. carriage builders.

                So, where to look?
                Axles, the underside and the wheel nuts.
                Back cross streacher on the seat riser.
                under the seat. Both the seat cushion and the seat base. Don't forget to lift that little trap door under the seat (if it's equipped with one).
                Pull a wheel off. Look at the inside of the wheel's hub. Sometimes the manufacturer stamped there or on the metal ring that secures the spokes. Look on the diamond shaped plates that secure the wood fellows (the wood part of the wheel rim). Sometimes they were stamped with initials as well. Unfortuneately, wheels are just the same on carriages as automobiles. They get replaced a lot. So they may not be original. And that's not a bad thing. The originals may have become unsafe.

                Try these addresses:

                Carriage Association of America
                H.K. Sowles, Jr, Secretary/Treasurer (There may be a new one)
                Box 3788, Portland, Maine 04104

                American Driving Society
                Robert G Heath, Secretary
                339 Warburton Ave, Hastings On Hudson, NY 10706

                Please keep in mind I haven't had any contact with these worthy associations in many years. The addresses may have changed. The American Driving Society is geared to the use of carriages and training of carriage horses. They are a bit more informal and quite friendly. The Carriage Association is more formal and are devoted largely to the museum preservation of horse drawn vehicles of all types.

                Good luck! I used to have a ton of fun with my horses and carriages.

                Lotsa Larks!
                K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                Ron Smith
                Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                Ron Smith
                Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

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