Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Basecoat Clearcoat or Acrylic Enamel?

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Basecoat Clearcoat or Acrylic Enamel?

    I plan to pain my 64 R2 Hawk sometime in the next year and am debating whether to use the original enamel type paint or go with modern basecoat/clearcoat combo. I was intending to use the enamel until I read the story about Pat Doherty's '56 Golden Hawk in the latest Hemmings Classic Car. Pat used basecoat clearcoat!

    Dan White
    64 R1 GT
    64 R2 GT

  • #2
    It depends... what color is it?

    Solid colors, it doesn't matter much; if it's a metallic color, I prefer BC/CC. What makes the difference is at the inevitable touch-up/repair time; it's much easier to spot in/blend color with BC/CC... with solids, it's not as big of a deal.

    Note that a big advantage of BC/CC even with solids is that color is sprayed to desired tone with very little regard to shine or texture; the clear takes care of that! You can put extra clear on and sand and buff it really really flat [8D]

    I'd say if it's a fair driver, Acrylic Enamel is fine; if you want a show-quality paint job, BC/CC is the way to go!

    Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
    http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

    Comment


    • #3
      Another option would be single stage urethane. It goes on like the clearcoat but the color is included and it can be wetsanded and buffed just like the BC/CC. Either of these would provide a long lasting shine. With enamel you'll need to keep it polished to retard oxidation.
      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
      sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

      Comment


      • #4
        I realize that some of the basecoat/clearcoat urethane jobs may look "over-restored". At the same time, it is an actual fact that none of the refinish products currently available are exactly what the factory originally used. That said, it is then the best approach to use the most up-to-date products available. What would probably be the best suited for your project is what is commonly called a "single-stage" topcoat. It is an acrylic enamel that has had additives to make it have the same properties as an acrylic urethane, without having to use a clearcoat over the colorcoat. The end result, properly applied, is very much like the factory finish in appearance. If you find a body shop/painter that understands what you expect for the end result, you are in luck! Do not, do not,do not, let someone paint your car with a so-called synthetic or alkyd enamel! That paint, while cheaper,and very glossy, will not last.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd definately go with the bc/cc.as bams50 says,if using a metallic paint.I prefer single stage for most 'solid' colors.
          Use a GOOD urethane,may cost 5 times more for paint,but well worth the extra cost..


          LaSalle,Il
          61Hawk
          60Lark
          Oglesby,Il.

          Comment


          • #6
            One possible way to get a good paint job would be to meticulously prepare your car ie. do the body work your self if you are competent or incompetent, your'e gonna have to live with it. Carefully clean all areas to be painted, and thoroughly mask all areas that you don't want painted. Either that or remove bumpers or whatever thingys you don't want any paint on. Take it to Maaco or one of those like outfits and have their top of the line paints applied. About $400.00. No they won't restore your car for $400.00 but some of those places have excellent painters only because they have practiced on so many cars. Hang out there a bit if you can and chat with the guys that really do the work. Look at their end results. Prepping the car yourself will only help to insure that you end up with a good clean job. Ask questions. They may take a special interest in your car and do a really bang up job. You may even be able to request that a certain fellow do the painting. Remember, a paint job can only be as good as the prep work that goes into it. A turd covered with even the best of paints while being competently applied is still a P.O.S. These shops buy their paints in bulk and can offer tremendous savings. They have some nice colors too. You will probably have a paint job for less than what you could possibly buy the materials for yourself. Another plus is that they have the proper facilities as you may not. I am sure that there are exceptions to what I have stated. Do your homework and you should be satisfied. This is just an alternative way of having your car painted without having to spend big bucks. Please don't hold me responsibile for not satisfactory results. jimmijim8
            sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

            Comment


            • #7
              BC/CC is a conspiracy.
              Used to be you could shoot a whole car with a gallon of primer, a gallon of paint, and two gallons of thinner.
              Now it takes a gallon of etch primer (and thinner), a gallon or fill primer (and thinner), a gallon of epoxy hardcoat top primer (and thinner), a gallon of color (and thinner), and a gallon of clearcoat (and thinner)...add to that all the speed up crap if you're cold, and slow down crap if you're hot, fish eye stuff, and then all the normal stuff.
              But, like fine wine (beer), and perdy women...
              OOOoooohhhhh, it looks so nice when you are done
              Jeff[8D]




              quote:Originally posted by Dan White

              I plan to pain my 64 R2 Hawk sometime in the next year and am debating whether to use the original enamel type paint or go with modern basecoat/clearcoat combo. I was intending to use the enamel until I read the story about Pat Doherty's '56 Golden Hawk in the latest Hemmings Classic Car. Pat used basecoat clearcoat!

              Dan White
              64 R1 GT
              64 R2 GT
              HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

              Jeff


              Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



              Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

              Comment


              • #8
                I believe it is a conspiracy. Most on the newsgroup take the new paint as GOD'S GIFT to the auto enthusiasts. It's a gift into the jobber's wallet. Planned obsolecence. We had a pissin contest a while back and I lost. My preference for lacquer paint was compared to liking hot dogs. Look at the hot dog paint job on the Northwest Avanti auction on e-bay right now. Yeah maybe it will not hold up in the elements as the new stuff, maybe it will. Most people keep their pride and joy in a garage when not being used. Not trying to have a debate. 1 gallon of primer + 1 gallon of Acrylic lacquer+ a couple gallons of thinner = a nice inexpensive quality paint job. Clear lacquer is an option. Thank you God, but if I can have my way, you can keep the new fangled stuff. jimmijim
                sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thers always a pro n con to any paint job.I been painting cars for nigh on to 37 years.I've used most ever kind of paint, different brands,acrylics enamels,laquers and bc/cc.All are good but for an original car i would go with the acrylic enamel with a hardener.Its harder to spray but the gloss and finish is as good as factory.Alot depends on who is spraying it. The bc/ccgives a fantastic shine but each panel has to be sprayed the same way or you will have shading when its reassembled.Just be sure when you get it sprayed the person doing it knows what hes doing.One thing i've noticed on bc/cc cars that in 5 or 6 years the clear coat starts to peel,and thats on new factory painted cars.Mostly its a personal choice just be sure you get someone that know what there doing to spray it.oh, btw i agree with jimjim,i guess im just old school

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dan,
                    I just painted my car with acrylic enamel with a hardener. The final gloss is softer than bc/cc and more like original. It tends though to have a kind of "waxy haze" and lacks some mirror type depth. That is typical of the finish. Painting solid color is easy. Shooting color with poly flake is hard. The paint tends to go to tack very quickly so any over spray will give you some orange peel. If you use the hardener you can wet sand and buff a solid color but not the poly. Color coats don't tend to blend with each other like lacquer but rather are just siting one coat on top of the next. You will end up sanding through to an underneath color coat where the poly dispersment was a little different and it will show up as a shading difference.
                    Thanks, Tom,

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The downside to Maaco is that unless you are spending over 1500, then
                      they only use the cheaper enamel. Earl Schieb ONLY uses urethane. I
                      posted some pictures on this thread, and a description :

                      http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...?TOPIC_ID=3793

                      It was only 600 including some body work, its been over a year, still
                      hasnt been waxed, or covered, and it looks GREAT!

                      Tom
                      '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                      Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                      http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                      I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X