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Facts from 1951 (A little long and slightly OT)

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  • Facts from 1951 (A little long and slightly OT)

    Okay, after watching "Tucker" (for the first time) recently, I got in the mood to look up what types of things were going on when Stella rolled off the assembly line. Here's a hodgepodge of 1951 facts and such...
    • Bear Bryant won his first Sugar Bowl (He was Kentucky's head coach at the time)
    • Tupperware and Swanson Frozen TV Dinners were introduced
    • Topps entered the baseball card field in the post-World War II period with its first series in 1951
    • On March 31, 1951, the Census Bureau accepted delivery of the first UNIVAC computer
    • Best film - An American in Paris
    • Best actor - Humphrey Bogart - The African Queen
    • Best actress - Vivien Leigh (Scarlett from Gone with the Wind) - A Streetcar Named Desire (From which Stella is somewhat named)
    • Broadway - The King and I opens
    • TV - I Love Lucy premieres
    • New on bookshelves - Catcher in the Rye
    • Dennis the Menace premieres
    • The Oscars are broadcast nation-wide in the US and Canada for the first-time
    • CBS presents the first commercial colour TV broadcast, but the public only has black and white TV's
    • The first transcontinental TV broadcast and direct dial phone service is introduced
    • New York Yankees win the World Series
    • The Albert Einstein Award is first awarded
    • North Korean offensive pushes beyond the 38th parallel; truce negotiations fail
    • Congress passes 22nd Amendment, limiting a President to two terms
    • General Douglas MacArthur relieved of command in Korea
    • The average cost of four years of college was now $1,800
    • AT&T became the first corporation with over one million stockholders
    • Fluoridation in the water supply for the fight against tooth decay
    • New products: power steering (Chrysler), sugarless chewing gum and Tropicana products
    • Joe Dimaggo retired (life time batting average of .325)
    • Lacosta first put the alligator symbol on tennis shirts (Izod, I believe)
    • Songs:Hello Young Lovers, Getting to Know You, Cry, Kisses Sweeter than Wine, In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening
    • In response to the growing popularity of television, movie theatres experiment with a variety of attractions, including wide-screen projection and 3-D effects




    1951 Commander Starlight Coupe (aka "Stella")
    www.bulletshots.net
    www.bulletshots.net/blog
    www.alabamastudes.com


  • #2
    Just based on memory, I would disagree with your list.

    Baseball cards go back to the teens. I believe that the high dollar H. Wagner card is the first, if not one of the first. I believe that originally they were with tobacco. Perhaps, 1951 was when they were first with bubble gum.

    I am sure that computers predate 1951. My BIL was working at IBM Poughkeepsie assembling computers in 1951. Perhaps 1951 was the start of home computers, but that doesn't sound right either.

    Someone else can take the time to research all of the items. My point is, do not believe everything that is written.

    Gary L.
    1954 Commander Starliner (restomod)
    1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Comment


    • #3
      Einstein unveiled his famous E=mc2 theorum in 1905. The first atomic bomb was based on Einstein's theory, and it was exploded in the 1940's. The first atomic reaction was in Chicago in 1942.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hmm... Looks like I got a hold of some crappy facts sites then. These might be what the above descriptions were meaning...

        "Topps entered the baseball card field in the post-World War II period with its first series in 1951." Looks like baseball cards themselves have been around since the 1880s.
        http://www.beckett.com/news/cardco.asp?sport=topps

        "On March 31, 1951, the Census Bureau accepted delivery of the first UNIVAC computer. The final cost of constructing the first UNIVAC was close to one million dollars. Forty-six UNIVAC computers were built for both government and business uses. Remington Rand became the first American manufacturers of a commercial computer system. Their first non-government contract was for General Electric's Appliance Park facility in Louisville, Kentucky, who used the UNIVAC computer for a payroll application."
        http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa062398.htm

        I didn't really find anything on '51 and Einstein other than:
        "The Albert Einstein Award is a prestigious award in theoretical physics, named after the famous physicist Albert Einstein. It was first awarded in 1951."
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Einstein_Award

        I'll make those changes to the list. It was meant mostly for fun anyway.



        1951 Commander Starlight Coupe (aka "Stella")
        www.bulletshots.net
        www.bulletshots.net/blog
        www.alabamastudes.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Based on the way the "facts" are worded, I would say they are probably correct. The first UNIVAC was purchased by the Census Bureau and also accurately predicted the Eisenhower election. They don't say the computer was invented in 1951 or that there were no baseball cards prior to that year.
          The important missing fact is my first birthday.
          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by rockne10

            Based on the way the "facts" are worded, I would say they are probably correct. The first UNIVAC was purchased by the Census Bureau and also accurately predicted the Eisenhower election. They don't say the computer was invented in 1951 or that there were no baseball cards prior to that year.
            The important missing fact is my first birthday.
            I think that you are missing the fact that the list has been edited to reflect corrections based on what we originally commented on.

            It also misses the fact that my sister graduated from high school in 1951 <G>.

            Gary L.
            1954 Commander Starliner (restomod)
            1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)
            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

            Comment


            • #7
              In 1951 I was riding in a 1948 Chevy torpedo-back if we went anywhere.[8)] Of course, I didn't have any choice in the matter and I'm not sure I would've asked for a Stude as conveyance if I could have.
              We (Dad, mom & me) had moved from an apartment in Toledo the year before, to a VERY basic shack of a country house. Thru the years I lived there, we eventually graduated from the Chevy to a '53 Nash Statesman and then to a Ford Mainliner. When I left home in '63, my folks were driving a '61 Mercury Monterey. I learned to drive in the tired, old Mainliner. V8 stick shift, floor about rusted away! Wish I had a time machine right now.[V]

              Miscreant at large.

              1957 Transtar 1/2ton
              1960 Larkvertible V8
              1958 Provincial wagon
              1953 Commander coupe
              1957 President 2-dr
              1955 President State
              1951 Champion Biz cpe
              1963 Daytona project FS
              No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

              Comment


              • #8
                I boarded the Santa Fe streamliner for Albuquerque in 1951 to get inducted to the USN, leaving behind a peppy '46 Ford 4dr with my Dad. I was carless until '52 when I paid a whopping $650 for a '46 Mercury coupe that we drove until 1962. It made 3 trips between Amarillo and Norfolk with only one breakdown. I never had a Studebaker until 1970.
                I saw both oceans in 1951 and found out how cold it could get standing watch on that seawall at night. And I joined the navy to stay warm.

                Gib

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

                  In 1951 I was riding in a 1948 Chevy torpedo-back if we went anywhere.[8)]
                  Bob/MrBiggs - I see that we have something else in common. Our family car in 1951 was a 1948 Chevrolet Fleetline AeroSedan. I learned to drive in that car. After my sister had it for awhile, it became my first car. I replaced it with a 1949 Mercury coupe that I customized. I gave the Chevy back to my sister and BIL to use as a second car.

                  Gary L.
                  1954 Commander Starliner (restomod)
                  1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)
                  Gary L.
                  Wappinger, NY

                  SDC member since 1968
                  Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                  Comment

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