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Which engine. Original or a plain engine ?

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  • Which engine. Original or a plain engine ?

    Just curious (and more to come), but if you had the chance to put an R2
    Avanti back to its original engine, Would you do that or just put in a
    plain engine. ?? Would you do all you could to get the original engine
    if you knew where it was or just get any engine you could ?

    Opinions ?


    Thanks,
    David

  • #2
    David,
    Short & sweet,,, If the original "numbers-matching" engine is available, by all means grab it. This retains the cars originality as well as its value. The more that it is authenic(sp) the more the car is worth if you should decide to sell it.
    Dan

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    • #3
      Im trying my hardest so my kids will have something to be proud of. By kids, I mean my daughter and Marine son-in-law. They are in their early 20's and are the backbone of what is to become of the Studebaker Drivers Club.

      David

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      • #4
        Build a numbers matching engine by restamping a blank service block just as the dealers did.

        Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
        Studebaker News Group
        http://groups.google.com/group/alt.autos.studebaker
        64 Daytona HT
        64 R2 4 speed Challenger
        63 R2 4 speed GT Black
        63 R2 4 speed GT White
        63 GT Hawk
        63 Avanti
        62 Daytona HT
        53 Coupe


        JDP Maryland

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        • #5
          If you can find the original and put it back in, its a no brainer. Try to keep it as orignal as possible.If you can't find the original, look for another R2 to throw in..

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          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by bonehead007

            If you can find the original and put it back in, its a no brainer. Try to keep it as orignal as possible.If you can't find the original, look for another R2 to throw in..
            ...if you can't find an R2, and/or if money is a factor (building an R2 is expensive), get SOMETHING in there and drive it [8D]



            Dick Steinkamp
            Bellingham, WA

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            • #7
              David , where are you at? I got a phone # of a man in Georiga that has engines for sale he might have one ,and he will deliver ,so he told me at the Blue suede cruise about a month ago.

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              • #8
                I hate to give all his info out but David's in Gainesville, FL. Where are these engines at?

                Matthew Burnette, the 16 year old Stude nut.
                South Georgia Chapter Newsletter Editor
                63 Daytona HT (project)
                51 Stude dump truck (yes, I won the raffle)
                52 Commander Starliner (basket case)
                MANY more Studes in the family and a few parts cars.
                Click my name and check out "Links".

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                • #9
                  mbstude i forgot the name of the town i just got his #wrote down on paper.

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                  • #10
                    Answer - "it depends." Sure, any restored car is more valuable with proof it has the original engine. However, the Corvette guys gave up on the 'matching numbers' business years ago because it is so easy to re-stamp a block.

                    If the original engine is available for not much more than building a new R2, then go for it. If the seller wants whole car price for it, then just build another one.

                    Other than the supercharger and drive mechanism, there aren't any rare or expensive parts in an R2. They all started from the same lump of iron as any full-flow 259" or 289".

                    thnx, jv.

                    PackardV8
                    PackardV8

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                    • #11
                      Well, there is a bit more then just the blower/mounts to worry about over a stock 289. Figure a good 2K for the Avanti pan, windage tray, pistons, distributor, stainless wiring sheild, vibration damper,carb and hardware, chrome valve covers and air cleaner. I was offered $6500 for a rebuilt R2 engine, so they're not cheap.

                      Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
                      Studebaker News Group
                      http://groups.google.com/group/alt.autos.studebaker
                      64 Daytona HT
                      64 R2 4 speed Challenger
                      63 R2 4 speed GT Black
                      63 GT Hawk
                      62 Daytona HT



                      JDP Maryland

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                      • #12
                        As always,JDP, your points are good. For serious discussion, we need to define our terms - are we building a show car, performance car or daily driver? Second, do we have a guarantee the core engine we are buying is a genuine R2? Third, the supercharger and drive gear is a separate topic from the engine itself. Fourth, the R2 chrome rocker covers, valley cover and air cleaner usually need re-chroming for show use anyway.

                        I have only participated in pulling apart four supposed "R2" cars. Two of the four were more or less OEM. The third was actually a stock 259" under the R2 chrome and the fourth was a patched-together stock 289".

                        A typical high point show car doesn't get any hard street miles, so to fulfill that mission, all that is needed is the block stamps, good chrome, pan and damper.

                        A serious performance car is going to get all new internals anyway and doesn't care about the chrome, so it would be nice to have the damper, pan and windage tray, but better quality parts can be bought or fabricated today, so no R2 parts are a must-have.

                        A daily driver is whatever we want it to be, so again, the equation has to be balanced by what we have to pay for an R1 or R2 core, how fast we want to run it and how much money we have.

                        As far as $6,500 for a complete R2, we hadn't gotten to dollar figures in the discussion above, but that is not out of line if authenticity is factored in. Today, a good, complete full-flow 289" 4-bbl core can cost $500-1,000, another $1200 for internal parts, $1,000-2000 for cleaning, machining and labor, and your estimate of $2k for the bling, and we are at $5,000-6,000 without the JTA serial number.

                        Last point, the above is only a good price for an engine built by a Studebaker pro. Never pay a premium for a supposedly rebuilt engine without personally seeing it go together or the person doing it having a long and sound reputation on Studebakers. The horror stories abound.

                        thnx, Jack Vines

                        PackardV8
                        PackardV8

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