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  • You know... I just realized something...

    I was talking to another classic car fancier the other day (he likes Buicks). He mentioned that at the shows he goes to, a Studebaker is more likely to be driven to the show than any other car.[8D] He thought it was funny seeing all those stude-nuts (his words) washing and polishing off the road dirt and bugs. I asked him who he thought had more fun with their cars? He had no answer. Or wasn't willing to give one...

    Lotsa Larks!
    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
    Ron Smith

  • #2
    There are no Studebaker "trailer Queens" in my area ,but some very nice drivers,and some that are rough but ready to go anywhere.
    I don't know of a single Stude owner that dosen't work on his own car either. Their kinda like old Harleys,you have to have some mechanical skills to keep them on the road. Besides,who would you trust to take your Studebaker to to have it worked on? Wal-Mart? Canadian Tire?
    Most of the kids working there couldn't be trusted to change the oil correctly,and none could find all the grease fittings. Im sure some of the youngest "mechanics" wouldn't know what a grease fitting is.

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    • #3
      I'm always amazed when I meet a Stude owner who doesn't know how to weld. How can you possibly restore a Stude when you don't know how to weld?

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by casey

        I'm always amazed when I meet a Stude owner who doesn't know how to weld. How can you possibly restore a Stude when you don't know how to weld?
        So far I haven't had to use any patch panels in my Avanti.

        63 Avanti R1 2788
        1914 Stutz Bearcat
        (George Barris replica)

        Washington State
        63 Avanti R1 2788
        1914 Stutz Bearcat
        (George Barris replica)

        Washington State

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        • #5
          Casey, I don't know how to weld. That's why my "restorations" take 5 times longer than everyone else. About 95% of the work I have to do is done by others for money (ouch).

          I've always had a fear about welding. The UV is so strong I'm just afraid somehow I'll wreck my eyes.
          "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

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          • #6
            I used to know how to weld, but I don't do it.

            Two things I've learned over the years: Don't try to do everything at once, and don't try to do everything myself. I do the things I'm good at, which is most things in this game, and outsource specific tasks to others who are known quantities. In exchange for $$$, I get these tasks completed by someone else, which saves me time! That's important, because I don't have much time left.

            Welding and upholstery get outsourced. Is why I try to buy cars that don't neeed welding or upholstery.

            Frank Starr

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            • #7
              Funny you should metion welding and a Avanti. I just spent the last few days welding new bottom plates on the cheap Avanti's frame.

              Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
              Studebaker News Group
              http://groups.google.com/group/alt.autos.studebaker
              64 Daytona HT
              64 R2 4 speed Challenger
              63 R2 4 speed GT Black
              63 R2 4 speed GT White
              63 GT Hawk
              63 Avanti
              62 Daytona HT
              53 Coupe


              JDP Maryland

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              • #8
                I think that it's true that most Studebakers get driven to car events. Not too many trailer queens here. I have a friend who has a magnificent '32 Studebaker roadster. He drives it in traffic, on the parkways, etc.
                He wouldn't think of trailering his car.
                That's why it's called the STUDEBAKER DRIVERS CLUB.
                Rog
                '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
                Smithtown,NY
                Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by Transtar56

                  There are no Studebaker "trailer Queens" in my area ,but some very nice drivers,and some that are rough but ready to go anywhere.
                  I don't know of a single Stude owner that dosen't work on his own car either. Their kinda like old Harleys,you have to have some mechanical skills to keep them on the road. Besides,who would you trust to take your Studebaker to to have it worked on? Wal-Mart? Canadian Tire?
                  Most of the kids working there couldn't be trusted to change the oil correctly,and none could find all the grease fittings. Im sure some of the youngest "mechanics" wouldn't know what a grease fitting is.
                  I saw a young mechanic a few years ago at a GMC dealership who didn't know how to put a column shifter in to reverse.[xx(]
                  "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                  Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                  Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                  sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by Scott

                    Casey, I don't know how to weld. That's why my "restorations" take 5 times longer than everyone else. About 95% of the work I have to do is done by others for money (ouch).

                    I've always had a fear about welding. The UV is so strong I'm just afraid somehow I'll wreck my eyes.
                    That's why they make welding goggles[8D] The UV is strong, but even if there were no UV, you'd want goggles to dim the dazzle of the arc (or the torch flame) so you actually SEE the pool of molten metal that you are trying to manipulate. And goggles protect your eyes from being damaged by particles of molten metal or slag. That stuff can HURT you!

                    Nowadays, you can buy those auto-darkening welding helmets with a nice large window for a C-note or less. They really make a big difference in the ease of the entire process, because you can see to position your MIG nozzle or stick electrode exactly right by normal light, and then the glass goes dark in milliseconds as the arc commences.

                    Personally, I think my little MIG welder is one of the most indispensable tools in my shop. I have a stick welder and an oxy-acetylene outfit, too, but the MIG is the workhorse.

                    Welding is just such doggone useful skill to have, and it is a kind of trip to be able to have that kind of power to bend a piece of metal to your service by means of welding. I know it may sound sort of goofy or metaphysical, but if you cannot weld, you tend to regard metal as something intimidating and tough to work with. Learn some welding skills, and you can make that metal do what YOU want it to. Tremendously empowering

                    I'd urge you to try your hand at welding if the opportunity presents itself. Maybe a night school course for hobbyists at the local Vo-Tech? Or maybe a friend with some welding gear would let you try running a few beads on some scrap metal? Who knows? You might just get hooked.

                    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:I'm always amazed when I meet a Stude owner who doesn't know how to weld. How can you possibly restore a Stude when you don't know how to weld?
                      There are a variety of reasons why someone might not be able to weld. In my case, I have an implanted defibrulator and welding is forbidden. They don't say why, perhaps they don't want me near electric sparks. So my '53 coupe is currently being professionally restored at $70/hour labor charge, mainly since I can't weld anymore.

                      Jerry Buck
                      '53 Champion Coupe (C)
                      '61 Lark VI Convertible

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                      • #12
                        Sure hope that doesn't apply to pacemakers too as I am due to be set up with one when I get home in late June. Doctors decided that 47 BPM is a little slow, the only time it gets much higher is when I am working on my M series stuff. Also would hate to waste the $800 I spent on a MIG just before I retired. Fred

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                        • #13
                          Fred,

                          My resting heart rate is normally between 48 and 54 BPM, but then again I am a runner so my heart is probably more efficient. About 15 years ago I spent a couple of nights in the hospital and it got down to 35 BPM when I was sleeping and alarms went off. I have had some trouble with A fib, but hopefully no pacemaker in the future.

                          Gary

                          Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

                          1946 M-16 fire truck
                          1948 M-16 grain truck
                          1949 2R16A grain truck
                          1949 2R17A fire truck
                          1955 E-38 grain truck
                          1957 3E-40 flatbed
                          1961 6E-28 grain truck
                          1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck
                          1962 Champ pickup
                          1962 GT Hawk 4 speed
                          1964 Avanti R2 4 speed
                          1964 Cruiser
                          And various other "treasures"
                          Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                          The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

                          �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

                          For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

                          "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

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                          • #14
                            Check with your doctor.
                            I talked with one here in Florida and he said it was the high frequency A/C stuff that affects pacemakers (why some old microwaves are taboo).. A DC welder [u]might</u> not affect it...
                            (Read the three hundred page warning card that comes with it)
                            Jeff[8D]



                            quote:Originally posted by Oldcals

                            Sure hope that doesn't apply to pacemakers too as I am due to be set up with one when I get home in late June. Doctors decided that 47 BPM is a little slow, the only time it gets much higher is when I am working on my M series stuff. Also would hate to waste the $800 I spent on a MIG just before I retired. Fred
                            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                            Jeff


                            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                            • #15
                              gordr writes: "you'd want goggles to dim the dazzle of the arc (or the torch flame) so you actually SEE the pool of molten metal that you are trying to manipulate"

                              So, THAT'S why my welding efforts look like doo-doo![xx(] Will my Ray-Bans do???[] Those damned hoods just do NOT do anything for my looks.[:I]

                              (I know what you're thinkin' Gord - "there's NUTHIN' that could do anything for Bigg's looks!")

                              Welding is a GREAT tool to have in one's arsenal of repair (or fabricate) skills! But it just doesn't make sense to take ANY chances by not having ALL the appropriate safeguards when you do it.
                              Wanna know what Stevie Wonder's world is like? Weld without eye protection. Wanna learn a new dance step? Let one of those little balls of red-hot slag bounce into an open shoe! BE CAREFUL! Stude nuts don't grow on trees, ya know![}]

                              Miscreant at large.

                              1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                              1960 Larkvertible V8
                              1958 Provincial wagon
                              1953 Commander coupe
                              1957 President 2-dr
                              1955 President State
                              1951 Champion Biz cpe
                              1963 Daytona project FS
                              No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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