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  • rear brake drums ?

    How do you get the rear brake drums off? Having a lot of trouble.

  • #2
    Use this puller:



    Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
    64 R2 4 speed Challenger (Plain Wrapper)
    63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
    JDP Maryland

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    • #3
      Will give that a try. Thanks.
      quote:Originally posted by JDP

      Use this puller:



      Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
      64 R2 4 speed Challenger (Plain Wrapper)
      63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk

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      • #4
        Like the picture shows, be sure to put the axle nut on. Without it it could cause knee problems when it comes off.

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        • #5
          dallastx, if you try it any other way, it's gonna get expensive for the brake drums you're gonna hafta replace![xx(] You MUST have the sort of puller shown in the photo or you're gonna screw up your drums. Fact is, if you've already used another type puller to try and remove them, you may already have distorted your drums beyond repair.[}]

          You have to loosen that big nut and then put it on backwards so that it's flush with the end of the threaded stub. Then apply the puller and use a substantial sledge to whack on the anvil part of the puller.[:0]

          Miscreant at large.

          1957 Transtar 1/2ton
          1960 Larkvertible V8
          1958 Provincial wagon
          1953 Commander coupe
          1957 President 2-dr
          1955 President State
          1951 Champion Biz cpe
          1963 Daytona project FS
          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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          • #6
            Ok lucy ,Splain to me. Looks like you would pull the the lugs bolts out. Since im new to mechanics on studes am i missing something?
            I need to know cause i may need the same thing done on mine
            thx .Dave

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            • #7
              There's a puller of that type on eBay right now. Good price, if it stays that low.
              http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/WHEEL...84062169QQrdZ1

              1955 1/2 Ton Pickup

              Paul Simpson
              "DilloCrafter"

              1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
              The Red-Headed Amazon
              Deep in the heart of Texas

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              • #8
                Replying to Dave:

                No, the puller won't pull the studs out. Studebaker and several other makers used rear axles which have a tapered end with a keyway, and the hub part of the drum has a matching tapered seat. The very end of the axle is threaded for a big nut which snugs everything together. It is actually FRICTION between the male and female tapers which transfers torque from the axle to the drum and wheel. The keyway merely serves as an initial anchor until the taper becomes bonded, if you will. The joint is very strong. Another place such tapers are commonly used is on the flywheels of small engines, like lawnmowers and weed whackers.

                You HAVE to use the puller illustrated, or a similar design, because it pulls on the studs, which are anchored in a thick part of the hub close to the center line of the axle. Use a claw-type puller on the edge of the drum, and it will try to turn the drum inside out.

                Note the knobs on the end of the "handle" portion of the puller in the pic. That handle is actually what is called a "striking wrench". You tighten the puller screw by hand, and then beat on the end of the striking wrench with a hammer to further tighten it. You might easily knock that thing around a full turn or more after it's hand tight.

                Then you take your hammer, and give it one or two good whacks square on the end of the puller screw. Use at least a 2# hammer. One two good whacks with a heavy hammer is lot better than trying to beat the snot out of it with a little dinky one.

                After having done this, if it is unsuccessful, just go away and leave it for a while, under tension. Eventually it will pop free. A little penetrating oil like PB Blaster or Kroil can't hurt. Extremely tough ones might need application of heat to the projecting part of the hub, and nothing beats an acetylene torch for putting a lot of heat into a small place in a hurry. You want the hub to heat up and expand BEFORE the shaft also heats up and expands along with it. It's the differential heating that breaks the rust bond between the two parts.

                And, as the others have already stated, be sure to reverse the nut and install it flush with the end of the threads on the axle. This will help prevent mushrooming the threaded part of the axle. But, trust me on this, if you go at it hamfistedly, and beat on it and crank on it, beat on it and crank on it, you CAN mushroom the axle even if the nut is reversed on there.

                Once you have the drum off, and have done your brakes ( and you might as well repack the wheel bearing and set the end play while you're in there), be sure that you use NO lubricant of any kind on the taper when reassembling. It has to go together dry.

                Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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                • #9
                  That puller shown by JP is the only way to go. All I can add is to remind you to back off the brake shoes to be sure the drum doesn't hang up on the shoes. This is especially important if you have gouges in the drums from rivited lining being used in the past. The brake shoes wear to fit the grooves and will keep the drum from popping free even though the drum will spin freely.

                  Dale

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                  • #10
                    Other than the puller on Ebay, where else can I get one?
                    Todd

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                    • #11
                      The Studebaker (Dana) differential uses a 2 piece axle and hub that has the drum clamped to the hub by 'swaging' the studs (peening over the splined part of the stud to grip the drum).
                      The drum MUST be removed as a unit with the hub, using a special puller. Attempting to pull the drum off of the hub will distort and bend the brake drum face, rendering it useless (as mentioned here).
                      (Here is some information available right here on the SDC website at: http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tech_things2do.asp )
                      quote:Originally posted by dallastx75208

                      How do you get the rear brake drums off? Having a lot of trouble.
                      DEEPNHOCK at Cox.net
                      '37 Coupe Express
                      '37 Coupe Express Trailer
                      '61 Hawk
                      [img]http://community.webshots.com
                      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                      Jeff


                      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                      • #12
                        Thanks so much for the info, all of you. My brother has been working on this and is going to get the special tool today to pull them also. He also managed to locat a Stude person in St Louis who is guiding him along.
                        Isn't buying a car you no nothing about fun?
                        ONce the brakes are done it is on the the transmission. Will be posting about that.
                        [quote]quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

                        The Studebaker (Dana) differential uses a 2 piece axle and hub that has the drum clamped to the hub by 'swaging' the studs (peening over the aplined part of the stud to grip the drum).
                        The drum MUST be removed as a unit with the hub, using a special puller. Attempting to pull the drum off of the hub will distort and bend the brake drum face, rendering it useless (as mentioned here).
                        (Here is some information available right here on the SDC website at: http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tech_things2do.asp )

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                        • #13
                          Reading that thread I just had a horrible thought.
                          It was my Dad who re-installed my rear brake drums when I wasn't there,and Im not sure if he knows about the "no lubrication " rule or not.
                          Hes a good mechanic and probaly everythings fine,BUT,what if the tapers were lubed?
                          Will it make the drum impossible to remove the next time,or worse?

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                          • #14
                            IF the tapers were not clean, like if they had grease or oil on them, you can split the hub(hydraulic force) when its installed. And that really might mess up your day.

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                            • #15
                              wow you stude guys are smart, i been a mechanic/bodyman/painter since i was 15. look like i gotta go back to school agaoin when i start on my hawk. thank God i got this forum to teach me a whole new world of cars , YALL ARE SUPER GREAT. i feel like i just saw my first car. lol thanks guys
                              dave

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