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Shocks for a GT hawk

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  • Transtar56
    replied
    New shocks of any kind probaly won't help you much unless you replace the springs. Thats what really makes the car feel "mushy".
    After doing this to one Studebaker (my 60 Hawk) I swear Ill do it to all the rest that come my way,what a huge difference.
    Except trucks,the springs in them generally don't sag much (G)

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  • blackhawk
    replied
    My Hawk came with adjustable Gabriel shocks. I replaced the fronts in the early 1970s I believe. These have 3 settings. I doubt that they are available now. Anyone know?

    Dale

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  • N8N
    replied
    actually Dale if you want stiffer than the Gabriels you are probably stuck doing that Camaro interchange, that's the best one I've heard of yet. I think that Koni is still making shocks for that application, and I'd check out Bilstein as well - I've had good luck with Bilsteins on both VWs and Porsches.

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    62 Daytona hardtop
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

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  • blackhawk
    replied
    Nate,

    I probably could have returned the shocks and gotten new ones, but I didn't like the soft ride so did not want any more of the same kind. I'm not stuck on Monroe shocks. I'd use another brand. My Hawk came with Gabriels. I have never had any trouble with the Monroes but it would be nice to have a better (firmer) shock. Any recommendation? I thought we were lucky to just get any shock to fit our cars and did not have any options for better than average shocks.

    Dale

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  • N8N
    replied
    blackhawk, I did have a bad Gabriel frount shock out of the box (from Autozone not a vendor) but they swapped them out no problem. In fact I think they have a lifetime warranty.

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    62 Daytona hardtop
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

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  • Dan White
    replied
    The shocks I got from Ted (Now Phil Harris/Fairborn Studebaker) were name brand jobs and did not require any modification. They were Gabrials not Monroes like I thought.

    Dan White
    64 R1 GT
    64 R2 GT

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  • blackhawk
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by N8N

    Oh yeah, dale, meant to ask, what year lower control arms are you using on the car you're talking about? If the crossbar is too short for the later control arms that might almost be a direct interchange for a 51-56 car.
    I can't find where I have the interchange written down. I think they are front shocks for a 1980 Pontiac Bonneville.

    The one time (a long time ago) that I ordered new reproduced gas shocks from a Stude parts source I got some jippo shocks that were too soft riding. One broke very quick after being put in use. I deposited the rest in the dump.

    After that experience, I started using these interchanges that I can get locally. It has never taken me long to make the modifications, especially for the rear. Those are real easy. I checked my Dick Datsun Technical Tips book and confirmed that the rear shocks I have been modifying for my 1963-66 Studebaker cars are sold for the 1970-79 Camaros.

    There was an earlier thread about manifold heat risers for the V8s and someone mentioned using a Cadillac heat riser but did not have the details. For everyones' benefit, the replacement heat riser you need to ask for is an Everco #1095 and it is listed for the 1967 Cadillacs. Over the years I have replaced all the originals in my V8 equipped Studes with the Everco #1095. These are machined instead of cast. They work well and last a long time. I have never had one stick and have yet to replace one.

    Dale

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  • Alan
    replied
    Gabriel Red Ryder Gas 82087 front and 82151 rear

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  • N8N
    replied
    Oh yeah, dale, meant to ask, what year lower control arms are you using on the car you're talking about? If the crossbar is too short for the later control arms that might almost be a direct interchange for a 51-56 car.

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    62 Daytona hardtop
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

    Leave a comment:


  • N8N
    replied
    IMHO the Gabriels are fine for ordinary driving, I would only bother to do the mods you mention if I were going to use something like Konis or Bilsteins. The Gabriels are available for every Stude passenger car 1951 to the end (and actually I think there's only 5 part numbers total; 2 front and 3 rear.)

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    62 Daytona hardtop
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

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  • blackhawk
    replied
    I use Monroe # 5831 on the rear (last set were 5831NA). They are listed for the Camaro, but can easily be adapted to fit Studebakers. They do not extend as far as the original shocks, but I have never had a problem with them on either my '63 wagon or '64 Cruiser. The last set I installed were put on in 2000, so I am a bit hazy on details. I think the top of the 5831 shock has a crossbar with flattened ends. You need to cut off the ends where the flattening starts so you just have a tube through the rubber gromment. Then add washers to each side when you bolt the shock in place to make up for the shorter cross tube.

    I use Monroe # 5801 (last set were 5801ST) on the front of these cars. I forget which brand X they are intended for (early '80s Pontiac?). They also have to be modified and this mod is a bit more difficult. The new shock has a smaller crossbar on the lower end than the Stude shock. I have tried using them as sold by using large washers on the attachment bolts to keep the crossbar in place, but this hasn't worked well. Eventually the end breaks off the crossbar because of the flexing (but consider that I use my cars on rough roads in really cold weather; you may not have this problem). So, what I do is save the longer, stouter crossbar from the original Stude front shock, remove the smaller one from the new shock, and press the Stude crossbar into the rubber grommet in its place. This is not real easy to do. Bend the ends of the slot together to give the end a point, use lots of brake fluid, and a vise or press to push it in. I've gone to all this trouble because the shocks are available locally and I wanted a good modern shock. If you can get decent, firm gas shocks from a Stude vendor, you might want to go that route.

    Dale

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  • N8N
    replied
    Alternately, your local AutoZone can order you Gabriel Classic Gas which aren't that bad. If you want a performance shock, 70s Camaro shocks can be modded to work fairly easily, I've heard (not tried it myself)

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    62 Daytona hardtop
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan White
    replied
    Most of the Stude vendors have both front and rear GT Shocks. I got mine from Ted Harbit for about $96 for a set of 4 Monroes I believe, but I think Studebaker Intl. and others have them for about the same price. Check your Turning Wheels.

    Dan White
    64 R1 GT
    64 R2 GT

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic Shocks for a GT hawk

    Shocks for a GT hawk

    The suspension is mushy after 40+ years on my GT. Amongst other things I need to change shocks pretty quick. Koni's are way to expensive and I don't know how to cross reference them to Studes. How about any other brands (pretty stiff ones, not cushy)? Any numbers? Prices? Thanks KM

    Kelly J. Marion
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