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Isn't it nice when things aren't so bad after all?

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  • Isn't it nice when things aren't so bad after all?

    Since the Lark didn't sell, I decided to get cracking and started doing some floor repairs on the weekend. I'm glad I didn't spend the money on complete pans as it turns out mine aren't NEAR as bad as I had originally thought. The worse spot is where the drivers seat belt mounting bracket is:


    The floor around the holes looked punky but after spending an hour cutting out a larger than needed area and wearing out a couple of cutting wheels, I found that the steel is actually quite solid! Here's the piece removed:

    I removed the THICK layer of undercoat from the piece I cut out and found excellent green paint in all the areas about 3" away from the seat belt bracket. The bracket must have trapped moisture. Being the curious guy I am , I hammered away an area of thick undercoating nearby to find this:

    More shiny green paint! Looks like the majority of undercoating was dealer applied and not by a previous owner trying to hide a bunch of sins.It's a huge relief to find the underneath of my car is much better than I expected.

    I'll post more photos as I progress.
    Todd


    63 Lark 2dr Sedan


  • #2
    The experience I had with my 52 was that anywhere this thick factory undercoat had stuck fast, the floors were perfect. The stuff looks like heck and it's probably full of asbestos and who knows what other nasty stuff. But it sure did the job.

    I imagine it's main use was sound deadener. If only they had spread it everywhere along the tourque boxes and backs of rocker panels and more. Would have saved me a year of rust repair.

    Dan
    52 hardtop

    Comment


    • #3
      The experience I had with my 52 was that anywhere this thick factory undercoat had stuck fast, the floors were perfect. The stuff looks like heck and it's probably full of asbestos and who knows what other nasty stuff. But it sure did the job.

      I imagine it's main use was sound deadener. If only they had spread it everywhere along the tourque boxes and backs of rocker panels and more. Would have saved me a year of rust repair.

      Dan
      52 hardtop

      Comment


      • #4
        I'd personally just rather see paint... my '55 has lots of the factory undercoat on it and it is very dried out and is peeling off in sheets. At some point I will have to put it up on jackstands and spend a weekend with a plastic scraper getting rid of it all. I'm sure if it were driven in a damp/salty climate it would have rusted away to nothing by now

        nate

        --
        55 Commander Starlight
        http://members.cox.net/njnagel
        --
        55 Commander Starlight
        http://members.cox.net/njnagel

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd personally just rather see paint... my '55 has lots of the factory undercoat on it and it is very dried out and is peeling off in sheets. At some point I will have to put it up on jackstands and spend a weekend with a plastic scraper getting rid of it all. I'm sure if it were driven in a damp/salty climate it would have rusted away to nothing by now

          nate

          --
          55 Commander Starlight
          http://members.cox.net/njnagel
          --
          55 Commander Starlight
          http://members.cox.net/njnagel

          Comment


          • #6
            I live in Northern N.Y. I am sure my 37 was driven in winter here .every place the undercoating was { it was removed during resto},there was no rust. We have VERY salty roads.

            Comment


            • #7
              I live in Northern N.Y. I am sure my 37 was driven in winter here .every place the undercoating was { it was removed during resto},there was no rust. We have VERY salty roads.

              Comment


              • #8
                Well, I got the floors pretty much finished up. It's not anything concourse, but I saved quite a few bucks (I have maybe 50 bucks invested) which is money I can invest in what you can see.. Here's some photos:
                First I butt welded in three patches-the largest being where the drivers seat belt mounting bolt is. After grinding the welds, I gave everything a coat of "Zero Rust":


                Next, I copied the previous owner by applying a light coat of filler to smooth things out:

                After sanding that smooth, I coated the area with tremclad as I exposed some metal where there was high spots. I went a little overboard here -especially where the drivers feet will be:

                Finally, when that dried, I coated the works with liquid bedliner to match what was done on the floors in the past:

                They didn't turn out too bad:

                Again, this isn't how I'd do things on an original R2 Lark, but for my little former 6 cylinder Lark, they will do fine for now. They are strong and all metal. There's nothing stopping me from cutting them out and putting repro pans (or southern pans) down the road.
                Now all I have to do is remove the glass, dash, do wiring, clean up the engine compartment, rebuild the suspension, tear down the differential, clean up the engine, do the 4 speed conversion, upholster the seats, do the brakes.............
                Todd



                63 Lark 2dr Sedan

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well, I got the floors pretty much finished up. It's not anything concourse, but I saved quite a few bucks (I have maybe 50 bucks invested) which is money I can invest in what you can see.. Here's some photos:
                  First I butt welded in three patches-the largest being where the drivers seat belt mounting bolt is. After grinding the welds, I gave everything a coat of "Zero Rust":


                  Next, I copied the previous owner by applying a light coat of filler to smooth things out:

                  After sanding that smooth, I coated the area with tremclad as I exposed some metal where there was high spots. I went a little overboard here -especially where the drivers feet will be:

                  Finally, when that dried, I coated the works with liquid bedliner to match what was done on the floors in the past:

                  They didn't turn out too bad:

                  Again, this isn't how I'd do things on an original R2 Lark, but for my little former 6 cylinder Lark, they will do fine for now. They are strong and all metal. There's nothing stopping me from cutting them out and putting repro pans (or southern pans) down the road.
                  Now all I have to do is remove the glass, dash, do wiring, clean up the engine compartment, rebuild the suspension, tear down the differential, clean up the engine, do the 4 speed conversion, upholster the seats, do the brakes.............
                  Todd



                  63 Lark 2dr Sedan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Doesn't it feel great to get something finished?


                    [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                    Clark in San Diego
                    '63 F2/Lark Standard
                    http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                    Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Doesn't it feel great to get something finished?


                      [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                      Clark in San Diego
                      '63 F2/Lark Standard
                      http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                      Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                      Comment

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