Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OUCH! $$$$$$$$

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Happily Married! and the wife can drive a 3-on the tree with the best of you! I will be the primary driver of this stude, and we talked about the transmission swap and even going to a Better automatic trans.(like a 700r),not 100% sure of the path yet,

    Dallas,Texas

    Comment


    • #17
      Want up to date information? I picked up my 259 from the machine shop this morning, 6/24/05. The total bill was $2185. That included rebore +.030, grind the crank .010 & .020, reground R-2 cam and reconditioned lifters, oil pump kit, gaskets,mill heads and deck the block, recondition rods, balance the rotating assembly, recon heads (no new valves or guides needed), check line bore of mains. Also done was preliminary hot tanking, magna flux, sand blasting, complete assembly and adjustments and a paint job.

      It is hanging on my hoist waiting for installation of a water pump which hasn't arrived yet but will be $65. additional. This mill should be superior to the original product. I probably left out a few steps but suffice it to say the job was done as thorougly as one could justify on a street engine.

      Phil Harris at Fairborn Studebaker supplied most of the parts and I cannot say I've ever been served better. Dave at the machine shop said it had been at least 25 years since he had done a Stude and he got a kick out of doing another one.

      Comment


      • #18
        [quote]Originally posted by Bunzard

        Want up to date information? I picked up my 259 from the machine shop this morning, 6/24/05. The total bill was $2185. That included rebore +.030, grind the crank .010 & .020,


        That's more money than I sold my father's 25K mile Chevy (whole car, not just engine) for this month. It's your money, spend it as you wish. My only question is; Why not use an NOS crank with standard bearings, rather than cutting a used crank down? Besides being new, I think that it would be less expensive.
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

        Comment


        • #19
          Well if the other half is game to a manual, you could'nt go wrong with an overdrive. I mean, after all, if you're going to do something do it right?[8D] As for myself, I'm going to switch mine over to automatics. I'm lazy.[:I]
          I'll keep the Chump as a manual, I think. Maaaaaybe not.

          Lotsa Larks!
          Studeclunker
          A.K.A: out2lunch
          Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
          Ron Smith
          Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

          Comment


          • #20
            One has to remember that engine machine shops are in the business of selling service, so they will tend to tell you that you "need" to do a host of things that Stude V8s don't normally need to have done. They have a "CYA" mentality at work, and will do "all" the procedures in order to avoid being burned on warranty issues.

            Dan, you have to look at 2 things: first, what is the condition of the engine as it sits? Has it been overhauled before, or has it got something 90,000 miles from new, plus years of inactivity? second, what sort of use do you plan to be giving it once it's rebuilt? Daily driver, Sunday car for shows, etc., or will you be racing it?

            Get a copy of the Stude shop manual and measure the bores and the crank journals, and see how they stack up vs. the specs in the book. If the engine was basically sound to begin with, just a little "tired" chances are you can make it into a nice runner by simply honing the cylinders, installing new cast iron rings, and new main, rod, and cam bearings. That's what the factory expected you to do when they built those engines. Renew the "wear" parts, and the hard parts will have a second life.

            Fact is, you can even "cheat" a bit on the wear specs, and still get a nice running engine when the job is done; you just may not get as many miles from it as you would from a full (and expensive) rebuild. If I were building an engine for a Sunday car, or even a daily driver, this is the approach I would use. You also have to remember that oil has improved greatly since the 1960s, and a re-ring job that would last for 40,000 miles in the '60s might go 70,000 miles on today's oil.

            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

            Comment


            • #21
              "As for myself, I'm going to switch mine over to automatics."Studecluncker-Do you already have an automatic to put in? If not, maybe we could make a trade?
              I went to look at the 259? engine today, and it turns out to be a 289 out of a 1964 Avanti. Block,Crank,Cam,Pistons.....No manifolds,Heads,Water pump,basiclly just a short block. It is extra clean and has been rebuilt, but has been sitting on a shelf for at least 10 years. The new owner of the machine shop said it was there when he bought the shop and that the previous owner had rebuilt it for a gentlemen that passed away. He said he would look for the old records of the previous owner. For $500, I think I will buy it and put it in my Lark.

              Dallas,Texas

              Comment


              • #22
                I have known several women who were quite proficient at driving a car with manual transmision. A woman with whom I was acquianted many years ago said her mother absolutely refused to drive a car with anything but manual.
                quote:Originally posted by Danarchy

                Happily Married! and the wife can drive a 3-on the tree with the best of you! I will be the primary driver of this stude, and we talked about the transmission swap and even going to a Better automatic trans.(like a 700r),not 100% sure of the path yet,

                Dallas,Texas

                Comment


                • #23
                  Gentlemen, let's face it, many things in life that are worthwhile are expensive. This is especailly true of hobbies, or perhaps obsessions is the more appropriate word for us car nuts. Consider how the cost of keeping up a nice Studebaker pales in comparison to the cost of a new car today. Look what you get when you spend money on your Studebaker in comparison to the cheaply made, mostly plastic, all-look-alike piece of [expletive deleted] you get when yoou buy a new car today. Okay, I'll crawl back under my soapbox now.
                  quote:Originally posted by Danarchy

                  started pricing parts for an engine(259)rebuild today and was stunned at some of the HIGH prices! Why is it cheaper to rebuild a 289, then a 259 [?] I am starting to understand why people go GM.

                  Dallas,Texas

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    what would the cost of a 289 short block be? I have had 2 inquires about the engine I just picked up, and might just use the extra cash to rebuild my 259. I plan to keep my car as stock as possible and didn't really want to start engine swapping right off the bat!
                    any estimates would be appreciated.-Dan

                    Dallas,Texas

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      If it is an 'R' or 'RS' engine, as a nice, clean reconditioned short block of unknown quality probably $1000 to $1500 wouldn't be too bad. It would depend somewhat on just what the specific cam and pistons are. And of course there will be some wondering as to the quality of the workmanship. You definetly got a deal though.
                      Tim K.
                      Tim K.
                      \'64 R2 GT Hawk

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        #R4987 or R4937, it's hard to tell if the 3rd # is an 8 or a 3???


                        Dallas,Texas

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Studegary, You are right, I could have ordered a NOS crank but by the time it was delivered it might have saved me twenty bucks...and stopped activity for a week at least...and the condition would be unknown until unwrapped. I opted to keep things moving with known quality. Brngs were the same price either way.

                          Gordr, As a former technician in an automotive machine shop as part of my nearly sixty years of wrenching on engines, I think your attitude could use an adjustment. A good machinist thinks kind of like a brain surgeon. Most people will be happier and better off if the jog is done correctly the first time. I don't doubt there are scum bags in the trade that will sell whatever they can, that is why the consumer or his advisor needs to know something of the trade. As a rule of thumb I would guess there are not many 40-50 year old Stude engines out there that won't benefit from the services of a good machinist. My engine would not clean up with a .020 overbore. You are not going to have a very satisfactory product by "honing and ringing" a block worn that badly.

                          Secondly, at my age it is quite a job pulling an engine/transmission and reinstalling it, especially in a nicely finished restored car. You would not like to hear my comments if it had to be done a second time because a few corners were cut in the shop and there is a fixed cost of reopening an engine, gaskets, fluids etc.

                          The reason I could afford this car is that the previous owner did a real nice job of restoring EVERYTHING but the engine. It looked great but ran like ___t. When he had to reduce the price to where the engine could be rebuilt and keep the total investment below street value I brought it home. Used a quart of oil in the first 100 miles and then got worse as it warmed up. I plan to keep the car as long as I have a drivers license. When it is finished I will be confident to drive it anywhere and let my non-mechanic wife do the same.

                          I've done my share of "quick and dirty" Chicago overhauls. I've fixed along the road in the snow and with chaff from a farmers combine getting into all the places it shouldn't be, but I'm doing my level best to never do it again. "In the shop and on my schedule" could be my motto. I don't need a "best paint" trophy and if the guy that gets it is stopped along the hwy with the hood up I will stop and help if I can...and probably offer some of these same comments to him while we fix. Thanks for listening.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Dan, do you trust that mechanic? If so, have him tear that engine down and look it over. I don't mean completely, just enough to thoroughly examine it. For another hundred fifty or so it would be worth it. If the motor is out of an Avanti, it's probably a really nice engine.

                            Yes I do have several autos to work with. I also have several OD trannys. All of them are in cars. I'm currently deciding which cars to make into parts junkers and which to make into driver junkers, Oops!![:I] I mean classic drivers! Yeah that's right, classic junkers, I mean drivers... Oh never mind....

                            Lotsa Larks!
                            Studeclunker
                            A.K.A: out2lunch
                            Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                            K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                            Ron Smith
                            Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Bunzard,

                              I stand by what I said. Put into the engine what you expect to get out of it. Don't go shopping for a "champagne" engine rebuild if you are on a beer budget.

                              Now Dan's engine may not be as badly worn as yours was. Maybe it's worse. He hasn't quoted the measurements his machine shop made, if they made any. But he did complain about the price, which is why I spoke up.

                              It's all a matter of allocating one's resources. Should a guy really dump 3 grand into the engine, if it leaves him short when it comes time to do the brakes?

                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                well, I have been messing with my(259)engine and I think it is in for the complete rebuild(as I plan to drive the wheels off it!), I put some Marvels Mystery Oil in the cylinders a few days ago and last night I got the engine to turn(by hand), there is some Harsh metal grinding sound and from what I can tell from the title and past registration slips, the car has 112,000 miles on it.(not 12,000)
                                I didn't even have the 289 engine for 48hours and a nice gentleman from Austin (J.Miller) came and bought it.

                                Dallas,Texas

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X