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Good chrome/stainless polish?

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  • Good chrome/stainless polish?

    I'm reassembling a '55 2-door F4 with the big 'arrow' pieces that hide the body seam and years ago StudeBiggs <G> recommended something available at a hardware store to brighten things up. What is that stuff Sir Bob? Or anyone's recommendation would be appreciated. Thanks!

  • #2
    Hmmmmm....[|)] I don't remember that I ever did recommend such, Tom. I have a variety of metal polishes that I resort to when the need arises. I confess that one of my top contenders is very fine steel wool.[] It's not gonna put a pro metal shine on stainless but it sure will take off the haze of oxidation that accumulates over the years. [^] I use it on older chrome work too. There's NOTHING like it to remove the haze or rust stains from older chrome! I was just using it yesterday evening on some brightwork bits of the 58 wagon. Try it. You'll be convinced!
    BTW, I get it at auto paint supply stores. The stuff in the grocery store is TOO coarse and will scratch.[xx(]

    Miscreant at large.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President 2-dr
    1955 President State
    1951 Champion Biz cpe
    1963 Daytona project FS
    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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    • #3
      Seems to me it was something like Zip or Zep? I'll try the fine steel wool. Thanks Bob!

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      • #4
        I would recommend using something other than steel wool on stainless steel parts. Either go with a chemical polish or use some abrasive material, other than steel, like plastic, aluminum or stainless steel. Use something fine. It is hard to recover after you use something too coarse.
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

        Comment


        • #5
          Well Gary.... I like to think I have a pretty discerning eye for brightwork. It was about 10 years ago that a bodywork guy showed me how he cleaned up some stainless before he put it back on the car. I was, and still am, impressed with the results that the finest steel wool gets. It's a whole lot cheaper than polish and faster too. Ya hafta try it yourself to see.
          I just sold some chromed potmetal headlight brows on ebay that came off a 1960 Lincoln Continental. I used nothing but steel wool to remove some paint overspray and 40+ years of oxidation from the pieces. Damned things gleamed like NEW! They were snapped up at my BIN price of $50 bucks each and the buyer wrote me an e-mail after he got them, praising their condition and how they appeared to be NOS - which they weren't because I had been the one to remove them just weeks before in a junkyard.
          In fact! If Lew here on this forum, will chime in about the Hawk side grille he just bought from me, he'd tell you how nice that used piece was and I'd assure you that all I used to clean it was fine steel wool.[^]

          Miscreant at large.

          1957 Transtar 1/2ton
          1960 Larkvertible V8
          1958 Provincial wagon
          1953 Commander coupe
          1957 President 2-dr
          1955 President State
          1951 Champion Biz cpe
          1963 Daytona project FS
          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

            Well Gary.... I like to think I have a pretty discerning eye for brightwork. It was about 10 years ago that a bodywork guy showed me how he cleaned up some stainless before he put it back on the car. I was, and still am, impressed with the results that the finest steel wool gets. It's a whole lot cheaper than polish and faster too. Ya hafta try it yourself to see.
            I have to agree with Mr. Biggs here. I have been cleaning up old cars for some 42 years now, and owned and operated a detail shop for a while. I have often used [u]FINE</u> steel wool, and tons of SOS pads to clean/shine brightwork.

            Perhaps unlike Biggs, I don't use steel wool by itself, I do usually use it in conjunction with a good metal polish (DWG Metal Polish.) My thoughts are that the steel wool helps speed the process, and the polish helps soften the effects of the steel wool. If you have a buggy, dirty front bumper, try some SOS pads! Again, the soap softens not only the dirt and grime, but the effects of the harsh steel wool. Once I try this, if the bumper is still dull, I'll try some metal polish, first without the steel wool, and if I'm not happy, I'll follow up with both, followed by just the polish with a rag, followed by DWG Classic.

            The GT I will bring home this week has some surface rust on some of the windshield molding. That rust will be gone shortly, the brightwork will shine like a new dollar, and there will be [u]NO</u> scratches! Period! Stainless steel, chrome, pot metal, aluminium, whatever, used properly, the [u]RIGHT</u> "grit" of steel wool will [u]NOT</u> hurt it! Heavy grit steel wool might scratch some materials, and not others, but I wouldn't risk it.

            Dave's Place
            Studebaker Emporium
            www.davesplaceinc.com
            sigpic
            Dave Lester

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            • #7
              I've always used SimiChrome(SemiChrome)polish on my motorcycles with excellent results.Heres a link.
              http://www.goodspeedmotoring.com/?page=subcat&man_id=23

              Dallas,Texas

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              • #8
                Don't know if you can get it in US, but I use a metal polish called "AUTOSOL" + the fine polishing steel wool. Works a treat every time.
                / H

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                • #9
                  I like Wenol, but I'll second Bob's recommendation of 0000 steel wool for initial clean up.

                  nate

                  --
                  55 Commander Starlight
                  62 Daytona hardtop
                  http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
                  --
                  55 Commander Starlight
                  http://members.cox.net/njnagel

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    In general, I agree with Bob and Dave. I only questioned the use of steel wool on stainless items. I have personally used fine steel wool on chrome items, like bumpers, headlight rims, side grilles, for more than half a century. I know that I have also used fine steel wool on some stainless parts. People that make a living restoring stainless parts say not to use steel wool on them, so now I don't.
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I use SimiChrome and a old wool sock. The simichrome is available at a VW place where I live (riverside,ca) Rub until fingers blister.
                      If the SS has the small scratches from steel wool, Scots bright pads, the "brushed look" not deep scars, you can use the 3M rubbing compound, followed by simichrome.
                      I do not like steel wool, it will leave minute scratches, and leave a dull look. Bronze wool is available if you must, still not reccomended.
                      I have dabbled in stainless restoration for about 12 years now, as a side line. I am by no means an expert, still learning.

                      Ross.
                      57 Provincial
                      58 Transtar
                      66 Wagonaire
                      sigpic
                      Ross.
                      Riverside, Ca.
                      1957 Provincial X2
                      1958 Transtar

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