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  • The New Studebaker Motor Company

    Any words or thoughts on the new incarnation of Studebaker? If this has already been a topic, Sorry, I'm new here.

  • #2
    Don't be suckered in. Until I see an assembly plant, this is just a sham.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

    Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)
    Tom - Bradenton, FL

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
    1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

    Comment


    • #3
      Geez - let's leave that one on the other forum. Besides - isn't it that their gonna offer a motorcycle first? What relevance would that have to REAL Studebakers[?]
      What's that old line about wishing in one hand and ....[xx(]

      BTW - Welcome to the SDC forum, jonathan! Do you already have a Stude? Or are you holding out to buy a new one[?][]

      Miscreant at large.

      1957 Transtar 1/2ton
      1960 Larkvertible V8
      1958 Provincial wagon
      1953 Commander coupe
      1957 President 2-dr
      1955 President State
      1951 Champion Biz cpe
      1963 Daytona project FS
      No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

      Comment


      • #4
        I love this subject...lets stir the pot alittle. Frankly I cannot think of a worse time to start a new car company...which is why I like speculating about what if Studebaker had survived.
        If in 64 they had arranged a massive amount of new capital and saved South Bend about all we can maybe guess was the next five years or so.
        So, as the 1970 model premier gets underway....
        Would the Lark have gotten bigger or smaller? I still think it's a full line with the Daytona at the top, two doors only, R2 powered and duking it out with Mustang, Camero, AMX and Mopar...
        Avanti as the large car...Avanti I; still 2 doors, multiple engine options, AT or four speed and Avanti II, a four door with all the goodies. Electronic Ignition and throttlebody injection might be standard accross the board.
        Champ and Wagonaires leading the truck options with that solid V8...gotta luv that sliding roof. Clearly Studebaker would of had the products.
        Here's the killer though. Same problem any new Studebaker Corp would face. Dealers.
        Gotta have a dealer in every automall and small town. Clean, modern, well-kept and stocked. Part of any financing Studebaker might of put together would need to be spent on fixing the distribution channel. Can't sell 'em if a customer has to drive 30 miles to find a dealer and when he gets there it's dirty, small, run-down. There were great Studebaker dealers even in the last, darkest days but, they would all have had to have been great to save the company.
        Once you hit the 1970's it gets really hard. Emission standards, bumper standards, crash standards, roll-over standards, seatbelt ignition interlocks and the Japanese invasion. Fighting all that took huge amounts of cash.
        The big three now spend about $1.5 billion to develop, test and manufacture a new model. It's hard to imagine Studebaker having that kind of bank, even a "new" Studebaker Corp.

        "Oh That? It's a STUDEBAKER!!"

        Comment


        • #5
          dang i must not be a puter whiz i posted my reply to a new topic...anyway somewhere i have an article from one of the mags regarding new(1965)designs for studebaker by brook stevens even included a 401 cube engine from the original 289 block....interesting topic, however hard to believe in this day and time

          Comment


          • #6
            54, idle speculation about "what might have been" is fine and fun. Promoting the BS that still trails on about some wanna-be motorbike builder is only detrimental to the image of Studebaker - IMHO, of course.[}] It's like those rinky-dink "Studebaker" radios that were in all the stores last year. If those things were equated - quality-wise - to Studebakers, then the common misinformational ideas of why they failed in the car business would be justified.

            I've said it before and I'll stick to it forever - if Studebaker HAD survived to this day, I might not be as inclined to (pardon the pun) "champion" the marque as I do. I like that while officially it's a dead company - those who would dismiss it, have no CHOICE to take note when one shows up at an auto show or the drag strip.

            Your speculations as to 1970 models might well hold water - but what about the wild styling concepts that Brooks Stevens did at the last? The Scepter wasn't a Hawk and it wasn't a Lark either. Of course, a Lark really wasn't a Lark at the end either, but I think a clean slate of names would've piqued interest. People like something new and fresh after awhile. Look at the turnover of names on Detroit offerings in recent years.

            As to you feelings towards them having to deal with emissions standards and safety stuff, look how long the big 3 soldiered on with their 50s small blocks!
            They would have to have come up with a new 6, for sure. Maybe we could speculate it to be a V6. They did have a prototype flat4 engine for a sub-compact. I'd like to have seen them follow thru on that!

            Miscreant at large.

            1957 Transtar 1/2ton
            1960 Larkvertible V8
            1958 Provincial wagon
            1953 Commander coupe
            1957 President 2-dr
            1955 President State
            1951 Champion Biz cpe
            1963 Daytona project FS
            No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

            Comment


            • #7
              [quote]Originally posted by Mr.Biggs


              BTW - Welcome to the SDC forum, jonathan! Do you already have a Stude? Or are you holding out to buy a new one[?][]

              Miscreant at large.

              No car yet but looking to get one as soon as the money comes available.
              I've been a fan for about 15 years. I'm 30 now and want to get one of my own, an origial one. Just wondering what others thought of Studebaker possibley reimmerging. Thanks for the comments

              Comment


              • #8
                From the time I was about 10 years old until I finally had the opportunity to see the Brooks Stevens prototypes at the tender age of 30-something, I liked to imagine what might have been had Studebaker not purchased dopey companies like Gravely Tractor and plowed their 1958-1959 profits back into automobiles. The Sceptre (which would have taken the place of the venerable Hawk), the proposed 1965 Lark and the station wagon proposals are beautiful cars and (I assume) still available for viewing at the Studebaker National Museum. The little second generation Larks that were being planned when Sherwood Egbert joined the company (he scuttled them) would have been in all likelihood failures in the marketplace. The semi-fastback, four-door Avanti prototypes done by Raymond Loewy that rotted away in the old Studebaker plant (where are they now?????) were...um....ugly....and definitely not the way the Corporation should have gone had the money been available to tool them. I agree with the previous post that Studebaker would have likely been toast as they entered the early 1970s, especially if Studebaker hadn't by that time developed a modern OHV Six. And I also agree that the federal government's emission control and myriad other regulations would have been tough on Studebaker. The 1970s largely killed AMC and AMC had alot more dollars to spend (and lose) than Studebaker. Finally, Studebaker's multi-story plant, already an antique by the end of WW II, would probably not have stood the strain of too many more years of production. In looking back, the Studebaker Board under Burlingame was probably correct in ending production in South Bend...even though we mourn their decision. It's worth noting that Studebaker Corporation showed a profit in 1964 thanks to its acquisition program. Any new Studebaker Corporation would likely busy itself with making kit cars and ugly SUVs!

                Comment


                • #9
                  You fellas forgot the NOX device of the late sixties. Detroit was dealing with smog devices on the west coast much earlier than the rest of the country. As for the survival of Studebaker? I have to go along with Biggs on this one. If the company had survived, I probably would'nt be interested in their plastic crapcars that they would be currently turning out.

                  With the smaller engine foundation that the company was using and the fact that their cars were compacts, they would'nt have had to deal with a large number of the pain and suffering that the big three tuna boat manufactories did. So I think that they would be still around if they could have made it up to the seventies. 74 would probably have been a landmark year.

                  Oh yes, and the current thread? No model specs or proposals displayed. It appears to be a scam. Personally, I don't know why the city of South Bend hasn't sued them for copyright infringement.

                  Lotsa Larks!
                  Studeclunker
                  A.K.A: out2lunch
                  Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                  K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                  Ron Smith
                  Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just being a realist, but there was sooooo many issues that Studebaker would have had to deal with in the late '60's and early '70's, they probably wouldn't have made it any longer than AMC anyway.

                    I would bet the when California was looking at passing their emissions act in 1963 and 1964, the corporate execs saw the writing on the wall. Studebaker sold a lot of cars in California and I doubt that it would have been cost effective to get their engines to pass smog checks.

                    The engine designs were dated and needed replacement. The cost of designing a new engine family would have been huge to a company looking extremely hard at the bottom line.

                    The assembly plant was outdated and extremely inefficient. Hamilton wouldn't have been able to provide the long term volume necessary. Toss in the need for a new engine facility, and the cost of a new plant alone would be prohibitive.

                    The '67 redesign was just another refreshening of the '53 car. They needed to do a serious reconstruction with an all new car. Ford and Chrysler were heavy into unibody cars and GM had very well designed full-frame designs. With nothing but cheap gas, they needed a larger car.

                    Add all this up, and you would have been in the 9 figuire range. And in 1960's dollars, this would have been (and was) waayyyy too much. While the diversification program did a lot to turn the bottom line black, the car business did absolutely nothing to reinforce that.

                    Now, if the could have brought out a new car and engine family and a way to streamline the production side with new facilities, they could have been competitive until the gas crisis. Of course, dealing with Mercedes-Benz, they could have given themselves a better shot at survival if they had handled the distribution and dealer side better.

                    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

                    Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

                    1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)
                    Tom - Bradenton, FL

                    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                    1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I searched for more info on the "new" company but cannot find anything. I e-mailed them and hope for some more info. Maybe it is just a flim-flam deal, but it would be interesting to see the company rise from the ashes some 40 years later, I just hope they produce quality stuff, whatever they wind up making, if anything.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Oh Pleeeeese Jonathan! Wake up and smell the coffee!![:0] Follow the thread in the Stude.com website and you can see this is a fraud. There's no-one more enthusiastic than the people who currently own Studebakers about them. And the general consensus is that these people are completely bogus. They have repeatedly been pressed for address, phone number, corporate board members etc.. and they have side-stepped every request. Besides look at their postings. I've worked in the Corporate environment. The spelling and gramatical gaffs these people commit in their postings look like some kid pretending. Nothing will come of this besides an attractive non-functional website.

                        Lotsa Larks!
                        Studeclunker
                        A.K.A: out2lunch
                        Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                        Ron Smith
                        Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not to mention, I think an American car manufacturer coming back at this point in time may not be the best idea. The Big 3 have to pull up their socks as it is, the "new" Saturn idea hasn't taken off as well as it could have and Saturn has suffered financial burdens over the years.

                          On the other hand, if Studebaker could produce a car as reliable as the Japanese, now we're talking. For some reason the Big 3 haven't figured out how to do that yet ...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            they wrote me back...just talking about it being real and that they would have to have upper level people get back to me, blah, blah, blah. I know this is prob. just a pile of doggie doo, but the idea is neet to me. Who knows? Maybe the Japanese are doing it....I don't know and don't realy care THAT much.BTW, stude.com has been hacked or hi-jacked or whatever and there are no old threads left so I could not read up on the whole thing. Pleas don't take this topic too seriously. Thanks All!

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